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    American Brilliant Period Cut-Glass Base, ca. 1880

    Appraised Value:

    $500

    Appraised on: August 18, 2007

    Appraised in: Las Vegas, Nevada

    Appraised by: Kathleen Bailey

    Category: Glass

    Episode Info: Las Vegas, Hour 3 (#1218)

    Originally Aired: May 26, 2008

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 1  

    More Like This:

    Form: Base
    Material: Cut Glass
    Period / Style: 19th Century
    Value Range: $500

    Update 10.17.2011:

    Since this segment first aired in May 2008, appraiser Kathleen Bailey discovered more information about this brilliant period cut-glass pedestal. Bailey found the T.G. Hawkes & Company pedestal pictured in an obscure reprinted catalog from the 1899 Paris Exposition. Rather than being a punch bowl, as Bailey had previously thought, the catalog identifies the pedestal and its matching 14-inch-diameter bowl as a "Center Piece" with the pattern name "Lorraine." It would more likely hold fruit or flowers.

    The retail value for the pedestal alone, in excellent condition, remains the same at $500. Bailey went on to say that if a matching Center Piece bowl were to be found for sale "in exact condition (which is unlikely) … a range of $6,000 to $12,000 (or more) at auction is possible. Matching the two pieces would be quite an accomplishment due to the rarity of the Center Piece."


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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (3:08)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Kathleen Bailey
    Glass, Pottery & Porcelain, Silver
    Antique Dealer & Certified Appraiser

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: My family lived in Florida and we were going to visit my grandfather in Wisconsin, so on the way we stopped at an antique shop in Chicago. And my dad found this piece. It was on a dresser that they had varnished, so the piece was actually stuck to the varnished table, and my dad spent about three hours working it off of the table so it wouldn't... it wouldn't affect the bottom of the piece. And we've had it ever since I was about seven or eight. And we called it a baptismal, for lack of anything else to call it.

    APPRAISER: Now, do you remember what he paid for it?

    GUEST: $25.

    APPRAISER: And what year?

    GUEST: I would say in the early, early '60s.

    APPRAISER: First of all, it is American Brilliant Period cut glass. That's the best glass ever made in cut glass in America. Around 1880 until World War I was the heyday for cut glass. This is earlier, in, like, the 1880s, 1885. These are teeth all around the edges here. And we checked these teeth, and they're perfect, perfect condition. You look for cut glass to be in perfect condition. On the inside, right here, we have a Hawkes mark, for T.G. Hawkes Glass Company, and they used Corning blanks, and cut their glass from Corning blanks. It's about an 1880s mark, and it's a trefoil mark with the birds. The piece is quite heavy. It has this zipper pattern here. And, so, are you calling it a compote, or you call it a baptismal?

    GUEST: We actually call it a baptismal.

    APPRAISER: And was it used for a baptismal for you?

    GUEST: For me, yes.

    APPRAISER: And it's wonderful that it was used for that. However, if we turn this upside down, we are now right side up.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: What we have is the base to a fabulous punch bowl. A punch bowl would have gone in here and it would have been huge. Wonderful punch bowl. The way you could tell was that the mark on the bottom should have been on the bottom, not on the top. And then you see this teardrop in here, can you see that?

    GUEST: Uh-huh.

    APPRAISER: Through the center-- well, it's pointing in the right direction. The retail value of the base and the insurance value would be roughly the same, and it would be worth about $500 as it is. Now, if you can get on a search and find the punch bowl that went with it, it would be $4,000 to $5,000. Not easy to find.

    GUEST: Right.

    APPRAISER: But now you know...

    GUEST: I do know.

    APPRAISER: ...the rest of the story.

    GUEST: The rest of the story. Well, it's good to know. Thank you, Kathy.

    APPRAISER: Thank you.



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