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    Two Tiffany Studios Lamps, ca. 1905

    Appraised Value:

    $130,000

    Appraised on: June 7, 2008

    Appraised in: Palm Springs, California

    Appraised by: Arlie Sulka

    Category: Glass

    Episode Info: Palm Springs, Hour 3 (#1303)

    Originally Aired: January 19, 2009

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 4 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Lamp, Floor Lamp
    Material: Glass, Metal
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $130,000

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (3:32)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Arlie Sulka
    Glass
    Owner
    Lillian Nassau, LLC

    Appraisal Transcript:

    GUEST: They belonged to a good friend of mine who passed away three years ago, in 2005, and he left them to me.

    APPRAISER: And what did he tell you about them?

    GUEST: He told me that they were Tiffany and that the floor lamp was originally in New York, I think in the '40s, and then he moved to Chicago in the '50s and the '60s, and then he moved to Los Angeles till 1988, and then he moved to Palm Springs. That one he bought in Los Angeles. Burbank.

    APPRAISER: Okay, and do you know when?

    GUEST: I would say probably '73. 1973. '74, maybe.

    APPRAISER: What's interesting to see when someone collects lamps is that people prefer a certain style, and with these Tiffany Studios lamps-- and, yes, they are Tiffany Studios lamps-- both of these lamps are what I would call "geometric lamps." But they have a little bit of decoration. They're a combination. You have a geometric background on the larger lamp, and then you have the decoration through here. These are what we call the Woodbine pattern, and then the floor lamp, that pattern, we have a number of names for that. It's called Swirling Leaf, Swirling Lemon Leaf, or Lemon Leaf. I'm not exactly sure what Tiffany called it.

    GUEST: Uh-huh.

    APPRAISER: I actually think that both of these lamps are on the early side, circa 1905. One of the reasons why is that the big shade, the glass is a very transparent glass, and at the time, when people were first using electricity or even using fuel, in order to get any light, the glass had to be very transparent. This lamp I also think is early. The reason I know that is... I'm going to take the cap off-- or the heat finial, some people call it that also... The signature, which is right here, says "Tiffany Studios, New York." It then bears a number with a dash. Now, in the old days, when we hadn't done a lot of research on the subject, certain people had speculated that that meant that the shade was a special order. But now, scholars are tending to believe that it meant that it's an early lamp. This has particularly beautiful, beautiful glass in it, as does that lamp. I'm going to put this down for a second, and I just want to point out, clearly these sockets have been replaced...

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER:...a while ago, but nevertheless, they're not original Tiffany sockets. The other thing is, on both of these lamps, a lot of times these get lost, but these are the originals, which is a very nice bonus to have. And even the original caps have a lot of value today.

    GUEST: Really?

    APPRAISER: On this lamp, it's on a senior floor base. It's decorated. There were two kinds of decorated senior floor bases. There's this one and then there was a pod decorated base. That one's a little more desirable, but there's nothing wrong with this. It has wonderful finish on it, it matches the shade beautifully and I also wanted to point out this little signature tag here.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: That's actually a very early tag also. A lamp like this, I would recommend putting an insurance value of $85,000, and on this one I would put an insurance value of $45,000.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: They're both very nice examples, and I am delighted to see them.

    GUEST: Great.




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