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    1967 Gerald R. Ford Letter & Envelope

    Appraised Value:

    $2,000

    Appraised on: August 9, 2008

    Appraised in: Grand Rapids, Michigan

    Appraised by: Francis Wahlgren

    Category: Books & Manuscripts

    Episode Info: Naughty or Nice (#1420)
    Grand Rapids, Hour 1 (#1313)

    Originally Aired: April 20, 2009

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 4 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Letter
    Material: Paper
    Period / Style: 1960s, 20th Century
    Value Range: $2,000

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:12)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Francis Wahlgren
    Books & Manuscripts
    Senior Vice President & International Department Head of Printed Books and Manuscripts
    Christie's

    Appraisal Transcript:

    GUEST: I brought in a letter from former president Gerald R. Ford to my grandmother. He moved here in about 1913.

    APPRAISER: As a little boy.

    GUEST: As a little boy. My grandmother, according to family legend, was Gerald Ford's kindergarten teacher. We would talk about Gerald Ford every once in a while at home, because he was a celebrity here in Grand Rapids. But she would call him "naughty little Gerry Ford," and we would laugh and we'd say, "Grandma, why is he called-- why are you calling him naughty little Gerry Ford?" And she'd say, "Well, when he would go out the door, "he would always slam the door. And one time, he pushed a little boy into a screen door." Now, my grandmother was very strict. And so we always had a lot of sympathy for naughty Gerry Ford.

    APPRAISER:: So poor Gerry Ford.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: Yes. He-he was an athletic boy.

    GUEST: (laughing): Yes. Well, a very athletic boy.

    APPRAISER: Now, the letter he writes to your grandmother, who then was Mrs. Malewitz—

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: "It has come to my attention that many years ago you were my kindergarten teacher."

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: And then the next line says, "That certainly does bring back memories." Like that kind of, uh... Yes, he's a master of understatement. Then he says, "I wish to express my sincere hope" for your good health.

    GUEST: Yes! Yes!

    APPRAISER: "Warm personal regards. Sincerely, Gerry Ford." He was then minority leader in the House. He was in the House for about 25 years, and eight of those, he was the minority leader. And what I learned yesterday at the Gerald Ford Museum, which was fascinating, that he wasn't born Gerald Ford.

    GUEST: He was not.

    APPRAISER: Leslie King was his name.

    GUEST: Yes. Yes.

    APPRAISER: That was news to me. In '67, this was written.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: So he had seven more years to go until he would assume the presidency and become the 38th president of the United States. And over here where the stamp would be

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: is a signature. It's not a written signature, but a stamped signature. We call it a free frank. That would have been postage for government officials-- mostly notables, like vice presidents, minority leaders. In the old days, it used to be actually written by the officials. And there are people who collect free franks themselves.

    GUEST: Really?

    APPRAISER: Yeah, so the envelope's important in this case. I would put an insurance value on it of $2,000.

    GUEST: Wonderful.

    APPRAISER: It's a great letter. It's a great family paper to have and to cherish.



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