Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

Support ANTIQUES ROADSHOW by supporting public television! Give Today
  • ON TV
  • ON TOUR
  • WATCH ONLINE
  • WEB EXCLUSIVES
  • RESOURCES
  • SHOP
  • The Roadshow Archive

    Fake Shang Dynasty "You" Bronze, ca. 1900

    Appraised Value:

    $200 - $250

    Appraised on: June 6, 2009

    Appraised in: Atlantic City, New Jersey

    Appraised by: Marvin Sokolow

    Category: Asian Arts

    Episode Info: Atlantic City, Hour 3 (#1406)

    Originally Aired: February 8, 2010

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 1  

    More Like This:

    Form: Vessel
    Material: Bronze, Metal
    Period / Style: 19th Century, 20th Century
    Value Range: $200 - $250

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
    Useful tips to keep in mind when watching ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (3:02)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Marvin Sokolow
    Asian Arts

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: I was actually on vacation in the Philippines and I got it in an antique store in Manila.

    APPRAISER: And this is a receipt from this Maynila Antiques in Manila. And they say, "One piece, bronze water vessel with patina. Ming Dynasty, 1368-1644. 19,000 pesos."

    GUEST: Pesos, right.

    APPRAISER: Philippine pesos.

    GUEST: Right.

    APPRAISER: Which is... that's about $400.

    GUEST: 400 U.S. dollars, okay.

    APPRAISER: And you bought this when?

    GUEST: Actually in January of this year.

    APPRAISER: January. They said Ming Dynasty.

    GUEST: Right, right.

    APPRAISER: And you came up with another idea for possible dating.

    GUEST: Well, by looking at some photographs of others, I thought that it might be much older.

    APPRAISER: This form, and everything about it, would have nothing to do with the Ming Dynasty.

    GUEST: Okay, good.

    APPRAISER: What it does have something to do with is the Shang Dynasty.

    GUEST: Wonderful. Oh, good.

    APPRAISER: 2000 B.C. to 1600 B.C.

    GUEST: Wow.

    APPRAISER: And this is very faithful to Shang pieces in many ways. Unfortunately, it was made in the early 20th century.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: It's a fake.

    GUEST: Yeah, I thought it might be.

    APPRAISER: Having a mark underneath the piece does not mean it's genuine.

    GUEST: Sure, sure.

    APPRAISER: Because they fake the mark.

    GUEST: Sure.

    APPRAISER: The form is called a you, Y-O-U. When I look at it, I see things I like. It has tao tieh masks. They copied it in every detail. It's right. That's exactly what they look like. These confronting birds are pretty much like what they looked like. But there are problems with much of this. It has this knob, the little handle on the top. That is absolutely not Shang. They never would have produced a piece like that.

    GUEST: Okay, sure.

    APPRAISER: Then you have these flanges, which are too heavy, too crude. These handles on the lid are too heavy.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: They're exaggerated. The tao tieh masks, there's one on the front and one on the back. They stick out too far. They stand way out from the body. Now, the Chinese, when they did this, these were for imperial use.

    GUEST: Yeah.

    APPRAISER: They were made at such enormous expense that it would have been easier to make things out of gold. These were made with molds, and the molds were carefully, painstakingly done. But not the mold for this. It's also too heavy.

    GUEST: Really? Okay.

    APPRAISER: The real ones are not that heavy. They made these copies, and they were not great copies, until about the turn of the 20th century, when they found originals that they started copying from.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: And today, they're sending copies out of China that I can't tell are fakes.

    GUEST: Wow.

    APPRAISER: They have to be tested. When you look at them, they're absolutely true to the originals.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: At auction today, this is worth about $200 to $250.

    GUEST: Is it? Okay.

    APPRAISER: A real Shang bronze... Would be a lot more. $40,000 to $60,000.

    GUEST: Wow, wow.



    WGBH This website is produced for PBS Online by WGBH Boston. ©1997-2014 WGBH Educational Foundation.
    ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a trademark of the BBC and is produced for PBS by WGBH under license from BBC Worldwide.
    WGBH and PBS are not responsible for the content of websites linked to or from ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Online.
    PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

    ROADSHOW on Facebook ROADSHOW Tweets ROADSHOW on YouTube