Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

Support ANTIQUES ROADSHOW by supporting public television! Give Today
  • ON TV
  • ON TOUR
  • WATCH ONLINE
  • WEB EXCLUSIVES
  • RESOURCES
  • SHOP
  • The Roadshow Archive

    Single Beehive Candlestick Clock, ca. 1844

    Appraised Value:

    $4,000

    Appraised on: June 27, 2009

    Appraised in: Raleigh, North Carolina

    Appraised by: Sean Delaney

    Category: Clocks & Watches

    Episode Info: Raleigh, Hour 2 (#1402)

    Originally Aired: January 11, 2010

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 2 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Clock
    Material: Glass, Wood
    Period / Style: 19th Century
    Value Range: $4,000

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
    Useful tips to keep in mind when watching ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:51)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Sean Delaney
    Clocks & Watches

    Delaney's Antique Clocks

    Appraisal Transcript:

    GUEST: I don't really know a whole lot about it. It belonged to my great-great-grandmother and was given to me by my mother, and she got it from my grandmother.

    APPRAISER: And so where was your great-grandmother from, or great-great-grandmother, I should say?

    GUEST: The family was from certain parts of western Ohio, and even into Fayette County, Kentucky, I believe.

    APPRAISER: Well, what you have here is a clock that was made in Bristol, Connecticut. And the reason I know that is because if we open up the door here, there's an original label right here, and it was made by Birge & Fuller in Bristol, Connecticut. And they were a partnership that was started in 1844 and ended in 1847 with the death of Thomas Fuller. And that ended the partnership, but it was a very successful partnership. But what you brought in here today is what we call a single candlestick beehive clock, which is probably one of the rarest clocks that they actually made. They made double candlestick clocks. You see just a single one here. A double candlestick clock would have two candlesticks on each side. It's a smaller size than normal, too. What's interesting about this clock is the mechanism. And if we open up down here, this is called the wagon spring and it really is what powers the clock. When you wind the clock up, these cords over these pulleys pull up this wagon spring, and it's sort of like a leaf spring in a car. And it pulls down and it offers power to the clock, which is pretty interesting and a pretty rare thing. There's a few condition issues, unfortunately, and one is the dial. It's a new dial. It's not an original dial to the clock. This glass has been repainted on this outer edge as well, which is a bit of a condition issue, but not major. A wonderful original tablet at the bottom that's just to die for. It's a beautiful tablet. That being said, this clock in this condition would probably sell at a retail setting for around $4,000. Now, there was one about five years ago that was at auction that was perfect and it brought in excess of $25,000 for a clock like this.

    GUEST: Wow.

    APPRAISER: If this clock were perfect today, in a retail setting, I think it would bring far less than that because of the economy and the way things are right now. I think in a retail setting today, if it were perfect, you'd be talking about a clock between $12,000 to $15,000.

    GUEST: How much do you think it would cost to...

    APPRAISER: Well, you can't really rectify the dial. It's such a rare clock, there's not an original dial for it. So these issues are sort of uncorrectable. Great clock; I was happy to see it and I appreciate you bringing it in today.

    GUEST: It's awesome, thanks. I'm glad I came.





    WGBH This website is produced for PBS Online by WGBH Boston. ©1997-2014 WGBH Educational Foundation.
    ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a trademark of the BBC and is produced for PBS by WGBH under license from BBC Worldwide.
    WGBH and PBS are not responsible for the content of websites linked to or from ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Online.
    PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

    ROADSHOW on Facebook ROADSHOW Tweets ROADSHOW on YouTube