Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

Support ANTIQUES ROADSHOW by supporting public television! Give Today
  • ON TV
  • ON TOUR
  • WATCH ONLINE
  • WEB EXCLUSIVES
  • RESOURCES
  • SHOP
  • The Roadshow Archive

    Two German Dolls in Original Clothes, ca. 1905

    Appraised Value:

    $10,450 - $12,550

    Appraised on: August 1, 2009

    Appraised in: Phoenix, Arizona

    Appraised by: Marshall Martin

    Category: Dolls

    Episode Info: Phoenix, Hour 2 (#1414)

    Originally Aired: April 26, 2010

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 3 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Doll, Doll Clothes
    Material: Cloth, Goat hair/Mohair
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $10,450 - $12,550

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
    Useful tips to keep in mind when watching ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (3:06)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Marshall Martin
    Dolls

    Antique and Collectible Dolls

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: My uncle had a storage room and moved out east, and he was looking to just get rid of everything in there, and so my brother and I decided to take it and, instead of getting a few bucks for the whole lot, we would go through it and see what was in there.

    APPRAISER: Uh-huh.

    GUEST: And we've run across quite a few things, and we ran across a box with some dolls in it. And as far as what I know about them, uh, I'm about to learn, I guess.

    APPRAISER: Okay. I chose two dolls out of the lot just so we could compare the two. Both of these dolls were made at about the same time, early 20th century, about 1900 to 1910. The doll in white was made by a company called Armand Marseille, and it sounds like a French name, but he's a German manufacturer, probably the most prolific doll manufacturer in Germany at the time. They made these what we call "dolly face" dolls, and they have sleep eyes, an open mouth with teeth showing, and those were all the bells and whistles that people wanted. This is a great example. It's got all of its original clothes, original wig. Thousands and thousands and thousands of this type of doll were made in Germany.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: About the same time, one of the companies, called Kammer & Reinhardt, wanted to make some character dolls, something that was a little different than the dolly-face doll.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: So they started making this type of doll, and you'll notice it has painted eyes, it has a mouth with painted teeth...

    GUEST: Uh-huh.

    APPRAISER: People still wanted to buy the doll with the sleep eyes and the open mouth. The dolls like the doll in black did not sell. Therefore, it made that doll extremely rare.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: The artist that designed this doll worked for Kammer & Reinhardt. He had a little tiff with that company. He moved to the Simon Halbig company in Germany and made this series of dolls. This particular doll doesn't really have a name, but it's referred to by the number. It's a Simon & Halbig 1-5-1, or 151. The doll in white, made by Armand Marseille, is a number 390. They're both style numbers for the particular doll.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: The doll in white, on today's market, retail, would sell for about $450 to $550.

    GUEST: Wow.

    APPRAISER: The doll in black is going to sell, retail, from between $10,000 and $12,000.

    GUEST: Whoa. (chuckles)

    APPRAISER: It's just a very, very desirable, sought-after doll. They did a series they called the 100 Series, and there are other dolls in that series that are worth even more than this, but you've got a spectacular doll.

    GUEST: Great. Thank you.




    WGBH This website is produced for PBS Online by WGBH Boston. ©1997-2014 WGBH Educational Foundation.
    ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a trademark of the BBC and is produced for PBS by WGBH under license from BBC Worldwide.
    WGBH and PBS are not responsible for the content of websites linked to or from ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Online.
    PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

    ROADSHOW on Facebook ROADSHOW Tweets ROADSHOW on YouTube