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    Goodwin Commode & Tuchfarber Lithograph

    Appraised Value:

    $2,600 - $3,800

    Appraised on: June 26, 2010

    Appraised in: Billings, Montana

    Appraised by: Brian Witherell

    Category: Furniture

    Episode Info: Billings, Hour 1 (#1510)

    Originally Aired: April 11, 2011

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 2 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Lithograph, Dresser
    Material: Tin, Wood, Marble
    Period / Style: 19th Century
    Value Range: $2,600 - $3,800

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:15)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Brian Witherell
    Furniture

    Witherell's

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: This has been in my family as long as I can remember. It belonged to my mother's father's side of the family.

    APPRAISER: The piece is marked in the drawer, and also more clearly on the back, "Goodwin & Co."

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: Goodwin & Company was a very enduring company and furniture dealer in San Francisco, California. It was founded in 1850 and ran until about 1879.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: James Porter Goodwin was the founder of it. He was an Irish immigrant, and he was very prolific. At his peak he was selling more than a million dollars worth of furniture on an annual basis, and employed up to 350 people, so a very extensive operation for such a rural company. It's part of a bedroom suite. This part would be a commode, so they would have...

    GUEST: Commode, okay.

    APPRAISER: ...a pitcher and wash bowl on top of it.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: An auction value for the commode would be $600 to $800.

    GUEST: Really?

    APPRAISER: But I think what was most fascinating was when we took the piece apart looking for maker's marks. And if we could take this top off real quick, we found this metal piece that was nailed down, which we undid, and I've got the wound to prove it.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: To discover this advertisement.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: Made by Tuchfarber in Cincinnati. It's a shoe advertisement. It's lithograph on tin.

    GUEST: Lithograph.

    APPRAISER: And they were one of the earliest, and today the most desirable, lithographers of advertising in the marketplace. Tin lithography was one of the earliest forms of lithography, and it would date roughly about 1880 to 1890. It does have some condition problems. We're losing some of the paint. It's blistering. But it can be restored.

    GUEST: Okay.

    APPRAISER: An auction value, $2,000 to $3,000.

    GUEST: Really?

    APPRAISER: In this condition.

    GUEST: Oh, wow. Oh, that's great.




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