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    Fulper Lamp, ca. 1910

    Appraised Value:

    $10,000 - $15,000 (2013)

    Appraised on: June 22, 2013

    Appraised in: Anaheim, California

    Appraised by: Suzanne Perrault

    Category: Pottery & Porcelain

    Episode Info: Anaheim (#1813)

    Originally Aired: April 21, 2014

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 4 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Lamp
    Material: Pottery, Ceramic
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $10,000 - $15,000 (2013)

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:54)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Suzanne Perrault
    Pottery & Porcelain

    Rago Arts & Auction Center

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: It was given to my mother. The lady that gave it took a picture and told her that she thought it was a Fulper lamp. And she said that she thought it had some value, and she loved my mom, so my mom kept it for years and it's been in her living room on a table, and she has since passed. And it's been at my house ever since. I don't know, I'm quite anxious to find out if it really is a Fulper lamp.

    APPRAISER: Yes, it is a Fulper lamp.

    GUEST: Oh, wonderful!

    APPRAISER: It was made in Flemington, New Jersey. Fulper is known for producing a pretty big body of pottery and a lot of vessels. And when they started actually, they were working in stoneware and making crocks and such. And they transitioned in the early part of the 20th century to art pottery. They did this sort of as an exercise at first, and the pieces turned out pretty well and they went from making them by hand to molding them and then putting really beautiful glazes on them: a lot of flambé glazes and some crystalline ones, some that were custom ordered because they were more expensive and more difficult to make. And so that market went up as a collectible during the late '60s through the '70s, the '80s, the '90s. And it's sort of plateaued and come down a little bit. Now, the lamps are a completely different part of this, so something like this would have been made about 1910, 1915. So the lamp is made, like pieces of Fulper pottery, of glazed ceramic. What is special about the lamp is that it also has inserts of leaded slag glass. And they're very rare. You find more lamp bases than lamp shades. When you find the shades, usually they have problems. You have an exquisite lamp.

    GUEST: Oh, that's wonderful.

    APPRAISER: That base is very rare. I've seen the shade before. I've never seen the two of them together. The match of the glazes between the base and the shade is so good, and the condition of the entire lamp is fantastic. I'm not finding anything wrong with this. At auction, easily $10,000 to $15,000.

    GUEST: Oh, you've got to be kidding. Oh, my goodness! Oh, that's... That's more than I could have ever, ever thought of. Well, that's wonderful to know and gee, I wish my mom would have been here so she could have known more about it.



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