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    German Character Steins, ca. 1900

    Appraised Value:

    $1,500 - $2,500 (2013)

    Appraised on: August 17, 2013

    Appraised in: Richmond, Virginia

    Appraised by: Suzanne Perrault

    Category: Pottery & Porcelain

    Episode Info: Richmond (#1818)

    Originally Aired: May 26, 2014

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 16 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Stein
    Material: Porcelain
    Period / Style: 19th Century, 20th Century
    Value Range: $1,500 - $2,500 (2013)

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:40)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Suzanne Perrault
    Pottery & Porcelain

    Rago Arts & Auction Center

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: They belong to my in-laws, my mother-in-law particularly. She was German. I'm assuming they are German. When it came time to settle the estate after they... my in-laws passed, we divvied up the collection. We took turns picking ones. I don't know any of their history, but we've just had them for quite a while.

    APPRAISER: We see a lot of German steins here. Every few minutes they'll come. And they're not remotely as interesting. And the reason for that is the German steins we see are much more traditional and probably came to this country because they were brought back either by tourists or by soldiers. But steins such as these, character steins, were most likely shipped here to be sold. They are so clever and the quality is so high. And they're very interesting. So yes, they are all German. They're all from about 1900.

    GUEST: Oh, okay.

    APPRAISER: And four of the five are by a company called Schierholtz. It is referred to as Schierholtz. The technical name is plaue. P-L-A-U-E. They're porcelain, they're hand-painted. This one, it's known as the drunken monkey, and I think he is... he's got to be the best. He's so wonderful and expressive. And then you have the pig. And then you have the sad radish. Now, down here this is another Schierholtz piece, and that is a monk. And this one has a lithophane at the bottom. As you are finishing your beer, at the bottom you'll see a little scene that is carved out, part of the mold. And this one is mildly creepy. As an older man seems to be, you know, looking very intently at a gorgeous, young buxom woman just underneath him.

    GUEST: That's a polite way to put it, I guess.

    APPRAISER: So that is the lithophane for this one. This salt-glazed stoneware, which is more in the traditional style, except he is a very cute looking, rotund cat. I don't know who made that. They're really pretty terrific. These days, they are most likely, at auction in the $300 to $500 range apiece. They're so whimsical and entertaining. I'm really pleased that you came.

    GUEST: Thank you very much.



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