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  • The Roadshow Archive

    Appraisal Updates

    Learn about new developments surrounding appraisals from previous ROADSHOW segments

    Clementine Hunter Paintings, ca. 1980

    Appraised on July 27, 2013 by C. Wesley Cowan | Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $5,000

    Update February 24, 2014: A correction: In this appraisal, Wes Cowan comments on the photographs connected with the guest's two paintings, saying, "Normally, one would think that's all the proof you need. But in the 1980s when these were apparently painted, there was an unscrupulous dealer who was bringing paintings like these to Clementine Hunter, paying her a dollar to pose with them, then taping the picture on the back to prove that she actually painted these." Clementine Hunter expert Tom Whitehead believes the counterfeit paintings Cowan refers to were first sold in the 1970s.

    • Current Appraised Value: $4,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    Louisiana Political Poster, ca. 1937

    Appraised on July 27, 2013 by Nicholas Lowry | Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000

    Update February 24, 2014: Appraiser Nicholas Lowry misspoke when he said "O.K. Allen didn't become senator until 1937." What appraiser Nicholas Lowry meant to say was that Allen J. Ellender, not O.K. Allen, became U.S. senator in 1937. Governor O.K. Allen had won the primary to be the democratic nominee for Huey Long's former Senate seat, but died in January 1936, before the general election.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000 (Unchanged)

    French-Cut Diamond Ring

    Appraised on June 20, 1998 by Susan Florence | Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $150 - $200

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Virginia Salem for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $500 - $700 (Increased)

    China Trade Shipwreck Gold & Porcelain

    Appraised on June 5, 1999 by Becky MacGuire | Tampa, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Becky MacGuire for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $70,000 - $90,000 (Increased)

    Thomas Commereau Stoneware Jug

    Appraised on August 21, 1999 by John Hays | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser John Hays for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    Steiff Bear, ca. 1930

    Appraised on July 14, 2001 by Timothy Luke | New York, New York
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Tim Luke for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    1851 View of Cleveland Watercolor

    Appraised on June 22, 2002 by Dean Failey | Cleveland, Ohio
    Original Appraised Value: $7,000 - $12,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser John Hays for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $7,000 - $12,000 (Unchanged)

    Weller Coppertone Vase, ca. 1925

    Appraised on July 13, 2002 by David Rago | Hot Springs, Arkansas
    Original Appraised Value: $2,500 - $3,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser David Rago for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000 (Decreased)

    Late 19th C. Tin Coca-Cola Sign

    Appraised on July 27, 2002 by Daniel Buck Soules | Kansas City, Missouri
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $7,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Daniel Buck Soules for an updated appraisal in today's market. Had the condition of the sign been better, its insurance value could have risen to $8,000 - $12,000 due to its rarity.

    • Current Appraised Value: $5,000 - $7,000 (Unchanged)

    Bronze Medallions, ca. 1910

    Appraised on August 10, 2002 by Ernest DuMouchelle | Charlotte, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Ernest DuMouchelle for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $6,000 (Increased)

    1853 U.S. Mountain Howitzer

    Appraised on August 14, 2004 by Christopher Mitchell | Reno, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $35,000 - $40,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Christopher Mitchell for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $35,000 - $40,000 (Unchanged)

    Confederate Belt Buckle with Stars

    Appraised on July 8, 2006 by Rafael Eledge | Mobile, Alabama
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $12,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Rafael Eledge for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 - $12,000 (Unchanged)

    1933 Trolley Car Advertisement Cards

    Appraised on June 16, 2007 by Rudy Franchi | Baltimore, Maryland
    Original Appraised Value: $2,100 - $2,600

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Rudy Franchi for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,500 - $3,000 (Increased)

    William Aiken Walker Oil Painting

    Appraised on July 28, 2007 by David Weiss | Louisville, Kentucky
    Original Appraised Value: $7,000 - $10,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser David Weiss for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000 (Increased)

    Mary Lincoln Asylum Sign-in Sheet

    Appraised on July 28, 2007 by Richard Austin | Louisville, Kentucky
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Richard Austin for an updated appraisal in today's market. The value has increased because the interest in Abraham and Mary Lincoln has grown.

    • Current Appraised Value: $20,000 - $30,000 (Unchanged)

    Frankenau Purse Revolver, ca. 1880

    Appraised on August 23, 2008 by Paul Carella | Hartford, Connecticut
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Paul Carella for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $4,000 - $6,000 (Increased)

    Folk Art Root Sculpture, ca. 1900

    Appraised on June 6, 2009 by Ken Farmer | Atlantic City, New Jersey
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000-$50,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Ken Farmer and Alan Katz for an updated appraisal in today's market. Because it is a very specialized item, and the main collectors for this are not in the market, the value of the object has decreased.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000 (Decreased)

    Mickey Figures

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Philip Weiss | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $900-$1,200

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Philip Weiss for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $900 - $1,200 (Unchanged)

    J. R. Bowen Gilded Banjo Wall Clock, ca. 1825

    Appraised on July 25, 2009 by John A. Delaney | Denver, Colorado
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser John Delaney for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,000 (Unchanged)

    1910 Hough's "American Woods" 3rd Edition Set

    Appraised on July 25, 2009 by Ken Sanders | Denver, Colorado
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000

    Update October 10, 2011: After this segment first aired, appraiser Ken Sanders got in touch to let us know that he now realizes he mispronounced the author's name throughout his appraisal of the American Woods set by R.B. Hough. The correct pronunciation of Hough's name is "huff" rather than "how."

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Ken Sanders for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $35,000 - $45,000 (Increased)

    1938 Ray Jerome Baker Book, "Hawaii, the Isle of a Thousand Wonders"

    Appraised on August 15, 2009 by Stephen C. Massey | San Jose, California
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000-$6,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Stephen Massey for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $5,000 - $6,000 (Unchanged)

    Tekke "Animal Tree" Asmalyk Rug, ca. 1800

    Appraised on June 12, 2010 by Peter B. Pap | San Diego, California
    Original Appraised Value: $125,000-$150,000

    Update January 26, 2012: Appraiser Peter Pap wrote to us with a correction to a fact in his appraisal of this object. The rug's warp threads are most likely sheep's wool, rather than goat hair.

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Peter Pap for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $150,000 - $200,000 (Increased)

    1899 C. F. Martin Model 1-21 Guitar

    Appraised on August 6, 2011 by Jim Baggett | Atlanta, Georgia
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000-$5,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Jim Baggett for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,500 - $4,000 (Decreased)

    Cole Porter & Monty Woolley Letters, ca. 1940

    Appraised on August 13, 2011 by Kathleen Guzman | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000 - $70,000

    Update December 23, 2013: We contacted appraiser Kathleen Guzman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $50,000 (Decreased)

    Louis Agassiz Fuertes Watercolor, ca. 1900

    Appraised on August 23, 2008 by Elaine Banks Stainton | Hartford, Connecticut
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000

    Update: November 18, 2013: In this segment, appraiser Elaine Banks Stainton discusses a ca. 1900 watercolor by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. After the episode aired, viewers wrote in to question the authenticity of the work, based on the spelling and style of Fuertes' signature at the bottom right of the picture, in which the artist's middle name is spelled "Agassis." In responding, Banks Stainton reviewed the appraisal, consulted other experts, and stands by her judgment that the painting is by Fuertes, who was an extremely prolific painter.

    Of Fuertes and this particular watercolor (which she believes came from a sketchbook), she went on to say: "[T]hough the one I saw [in Hartford] in summer 2008 was clearly not a formal work intended to be published, it was of a type that can be found in the various caches of the artist's drawings. ... Fuertes used a variety of signatures on his drawings when he did sign them and often did not sign them at all. Moreover, many of his drawings and watercolors have passed through the hands of other people who may well have labeled or inscribed them — something that happens commonly to drawings and other works on paper. ... Having considered the ROADSHOW watercolor again, I still think that it is by Fuertes. That said, I do have some misgivings about my appraisal of it. Although I thought it a fresh and beautiful work, some viewers clearly hated it! So perhaps I overestimated its appeal. In any case, in the present, very conservative market, it would probably sell for $4,000 to $6,000."

    1802 Meriwether Lewis Officer Commission

    Appraised on June 3, 2000 by Selby Kiffer | Austin, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $25,000 - $35,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Selby Kiffer for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $150,000 - $250,000 (Unchanged)

    Slave Quilt, ca. 1830

    Appraised on July 12, 2003 by Nancy Druckman | Savannah, Georgia
    Original Appraised Value: $40,000 - $60,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Nancy Druckman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $40,000 - $60,000 (Unchanged)

    Normandie Documents, ca. 1940

    Appraised on July 12, 2003 by Rudy Franchi | Savannah, Georgia
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,500

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Rudy Franchi for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,500 - $3,000 (Increased)

    Rudolph & Santa Characters, ca. 1964

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Simeon Lipman | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $10,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Simeon Lipman for an updated appraisal in today's market. At the time of the appraisal, it was unclear whether the objects were the only surviving examples. Since then, however, it has been verified that they are the only examples, and therefore according to Lipman the value would increase substantially.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $50,000 (Increased)

    Italian Micromosaic Picture, ca. 1865

    Appraised on June 16, 2007 by Stephen Fletcher | Baltimore, Maryland
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Stephen Fletcher for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000 (Increased)

    Lambert Musical Automaton, ca. 1895

    Appraised on July 14, 2007 by Richard Wright | San Antonio, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $10,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Marshall Martin for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $4,000 - $6,000 (Decreased)

    French Blue John Urn, ca. 1800

    Appraised on August 4, 2007 by Jeni Sandberg | Spokane, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Jeni Sandberg for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    Early 20th-Century Duffner & Kimberly Table Lamp

    Appraised on August 15, 2009 by David McCarron | San Jose, California
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser David McCarron for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000 (Increased)

    Cherokee Bandolier Bag with Document

    Appraised on June 12, 2010 by Ted Trotta | San Diego, California
    Original Appraised Value: $100,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Ted Trotta for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $145,000 (Increased)

    Bullet-Struck Civil War Sword and Letter

    Appraised on July 10, 2010 by Rafael Eledge | Miami Beach, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Rafael Eledge for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $6,000 - $6,500 (Unchanged)

    1811 American Silk-on-Silk Embroidery

    Appraised on July 24, 2010 by Beth Szescila | Biloxi, Mississippi
    Original Appraised Value: $40,000 - $50,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Beth Szescila for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000 (Decreased)

    C. P. Polk Verre Églomisé Portraits, ca. 1810

    Appraised on July 24, 2010 by Stuart Whitehurst | Biloxi, Mississippi
    Original Appraised Value: $12,500 - $17,500

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Stuart Whitehurst for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $10,000 (Decreased)

    New Orleans Chess Table, ca. 1870

    Appraised on July 24, 2010 by Andrew Brunk | Biloxi, Mississippi
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Andrew Brunk for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    Louis Aston Knight Oil Painting, ca. 1910

    Appraised on July 24, 2010 by Alan Fausel | Biloxi, Mississippi
    Original Appraised Value: $45,000 - $50,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Alan Fausel for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $40,000 - $50,000 (Unchanged)

    Korean Koryo Period Celadon Glazed Vase

    Appraised on July 24, 2010 by Lark Mason | Biloxi, Mississippi
    Original Appraised Value: $400 - $600

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Lark Mason for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $400 - $600 (Unchanged)

    Katharine Wireman Illustration, ca. 1925

    Appraised on August 7, 2010 by Colleene Fesko | Des Moines, Iowa
    Original Appraised Value: $7,000 - $9,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Colleene Fesko for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Decreased)

    World War II B17 Nose Art

    Appraised on August 21, 2010 by Gary Piattoni | Washington, DC
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Christopher Mitchell for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 (Unchanged)

    1906 Emil Nolde Etching

    Appraised on June 18, 2011 by Todd Weyman |
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Todd Weyman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000 (Unchanged)

    Belle Epoque Diamond Ring, ca. 1915

    Appraised on July 9, 2011 by Virginia Salem |
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $50,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Virginia Salem for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $50,000 (Unchanged)

    1963 Beatles Autographs

    Appraised on August 6, 2011 by Kathleen Guzman |
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Kathleen Guzman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    1963 Gibson SG Special Electric Guitar

    Appraised on August 13, 2011 by Richard Johnston |
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000

    Update November 18, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Richard Johnston for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $5,000 (Unchanged)

    American Musket, ca. 1795

    Appraised on July 9, 2011 by Christopher Mitchell |
    Original Appraised Value: $1,000

    Update October 31, 2013:
    Muskets made at the turn of the 18th century had flintlock firing mechanisms. The first percussion cap gun was invented by a Scotsman, Alexander J. Forsyth, and was first used in 1825. An observant viewer noted this musket has a percussion-lock firing mechanism, and questioned if the gun could be as early as ca. 1795. Appraiser Christopher Mitchell explained after the segment aired that many guns from this period were converted to percussion locks by the beginning of the Civil War. He stands by his assessment.

    19th-Century Texas Artillery Short Sword

    Appraised on July 16, 2005 by Rafael Eledge | Houston, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    Since this appraisal aired, several viewers have rightly pointed out that although the sword could have been used prior to the Mexican War (1846-1848), it could not have been used at the battle of San Jacinto, which took place in 1836. Documentation shows swords like this one were delivered by the Ames Manufacturing Company to the Republic of Texas in 1840.

    Carlisle Indian School Archive, ca. 1910

    Appraised on August 21, 2010 by Philip Weiss | Washington, DC
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $25,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    In the appraisal of Carlisle Indian School football memorabilia, appraiser Philip Weiss gave a very brief description of the mission of the school. Weiss was not inaccurate, but we received an email from a viewer who objected to what she felt was a missed opportunity to expose the controversial history of the Carlisle Indian School and other institutions of its kind.

    The topic certainly warrants more attention than can be given here, and we encourage viewers to explore the many books and websites available, a sampling of which are below:

    • "The Real All Americans: The Team That Changed A Game, A People, A Nation," by Sally Jenkins. Doubleday, 2007.
    • "Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928," by David Wallace Adams. University Press of Kansas, 1995.
    • "American Indian Boarding Schools Haunt Many," by Charla Bear, NPR, May 12, 2008
    • "An Indian Boarding School Photo Gallery"

    Carl Worner Folk Art Bottle, ca. 1910

    Appraised on August 21, 2010 by Allan Katz | Washington, DC
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to tell us more about the painted scene at the bottom of the bottle. The viewer explained that "Die Sieben Schwaben" is a German fairy tale by the Brueder Grimm. She went on: "In the story, seven men from 'Schwaben' encounter several 'adventures.' They are simpletons and are acting ridiculous, at one point fighting a 'monster' that turns out to be a rabbit."

    1850 Colt 2nd Model Dragoon

    Appraised on June 23, 2012 by Rafael Eledge |
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    After this appraisal aired, we received an email from a viewer who correctly pointed out that, contrary to what appraiser Rafael Eledge had indicated, this 1850 Colt revolver was not made in New York City. We contacted Eledge, who acknowledged the confusion, saying that even though Colt did mark their gun barrels "ADDRESS SAML COLT NEW-YORK CITY," where their offices were located, Colt's manufacturing operation was based in Hartford, Connecticut, at the time this gun was made.

    Gübelin Lucerne Mystery Clock, ca. 1900

    Appraised on July 14, 2012 by John Delaney |
    Original Appraised Value: $5,500 - $6,000

    Update October 28, 13:
    As viewers who are herpetologists could tell us, the original floating reptile used for this unusual clock is likely a turtle, not a tortoise. This is because tortoises are land-based animals, while turtles live in or near the water.

    Natural Pearl Satchel, ca. 1915

    Appraised on July 21, 2012 by Peter Shemonsky |
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    At the time this appraisal was recorded, the guest had been keeping her antique jewelry collection in a safe deposit box. Appraiser Peter Shemonsky advises, "Items containing natural pearls, cultured pearls and coral need special consideration if they are being stored in a safety deposit box. Due to the moisture and condensation that can occur, they should be wrapped in acid-free tissue paper or cotton. They should not be stored in plastic bags as this can also create condensation. It is also advisable to check these items on a regular basis to make sure they are not being affected by unwanted moisture."

    Miniature Portrait on Ivory of General William Colfax, ca. 1785

    Appraised on August 4, 2012 by Marybeth Keene |
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000 - $70,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    After this appraisal aired, appraiser Mary Beth Keene realized she had misspoken when talking about what medium was used to paint the miniature. "Almost all miniatures, including this one, are watercolor on ivory, not oil," says Keene. She regrets the error.

    Safavid Ceramic Bowl, ca. 1700

    Appraised on August 18, 2012 by Anthony Slayter-Ralph |
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $17,000

    Update October 28, 2013:
    Appraiser Anthony Slayter-Ralph has an update on this ceramic bowl: "I now believe that the bowl is probably Qajar [Dynasty] and 19th century. The Qajars ruled Persia (present-day Iran) from 1794 to 1925 and continued on from the Safavids." Slayter-Ralph believes that the value of the bowl remains the same as "it is a very large example and quite wonderful."

    1844 Polk vs. Clay Political Banner

    Appraised on June 30, 2007 by Catherine Williamson | Orlando, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $7,000

    Update October 21, 2013:
    After this segment aired, an email from a viewer prompted us to touch base with appraiser Catherine Williamson about her statement that "Clay was very much anti-slavery and in particular, anti-annexation." On the point of Henry Clay's beliefs and actions regarding slavery, he was known to be anti-slavery, calling it "a great evil," yet at one time was also a slave holder. He advocated for a gradual emancipation and the return of African Americans to Africa. Furthermore, Williamson explained in her response to the viewer's email, "Clay was a Whig, and while the Whigs were not explicitly anti-slavery in their platform, (or in practice, as the viewer mentions), theirs was the party that did not want to see the expansion of slavery to new territories. I suppose it is fairer to say that expansionism was the main issue of the 1844 election, not slavery per se, but expansionism and slavery were inextricably linked at the time."

    1896 Kelmscott Press Works of Chaucer

    Appraised on July 21, 2012 by Stephen Massey |
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000

    Update April 8, 2013:
    The Kelmscott Press began publishing in 1891.

    World War II Japanese Propaganda Posters

    Appraised on July 29, 2006 by Nicholas Lowry | Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $2,400

    Update February 25, 2013:
    After this appraisal aired a viewer wrote to ROADSHOW with a criticism of appraiser Nicholas Lowry's explanation for why English was used on the World War II-era Japanese propaganda poster. Lowry, admittedly not an expert on Filipino history, had speculated that the poster's use of English language was due to the influence of the American military in the country.

    Further research indicates that English became a dominant language in the Philippines because from 1902 to 1946, the colonial power, the United States, made it the official language and implemented and encouraged its use in the public school system. The viewer asserted, "(T)he importance of education was planted as a major element of Philippine society. We seldom hail the successes of our international policies, but this was one of our greatest. It was the establishment of schools which established English in less than fifty years, and left Spanish to be taught as a foreign language after their having been there for 300 years."

    Today, the national language of the Philippines is Filipino, a Tagalog-based language.

    1948 Aldro Hibbard Oil Painting

    Appraised on June 9, 2012 by Colleene Fesko |
    Original Appraised Value: $45,000 - $50,000

    Update February 25, 2013:
    After this appraisal aired, we received several emails from viewers who recognized the location of the placid Vermont scene. They said the painting depicts the village of South Londonderry, Vermont. Sadly, a fire destroyed the First Baptist Church (the red building with the steeple seen atop the hill in the background of the painting) in 2010.


    Bohemian & Loetz Iridescent Vases

    Appraised on August 4, 2012 by Alan Kaplan |
    Original Appraised Value: $1,650

    Update February 25, 2013:
    After this appraisal aired, we received viewer feedback questioning Alan Kaplan's description of how art glass is made, specifically in reference to the Bohemian vase. Kaplan has since written to us to clarify his statement: "All the pieces are blown from the top. On many pieces the pontil, or rod, is then attached to the bottom of the vase while it is being worked on. The piece is then taken off the rod and annealed in an oven. The bottom is then polished where the rod comes off. On the vase I was talking about, the rod was never taken off the top until it went into the annealing oven and when cooled, the top was polished."


    Standardization Manuscript for "The Star Spangled Banner"

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Francis Wahlgren |
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update January 21, 2013:
    The circa 1917 standardization manuscript for "The Star Spangled Banner" is now part of the collection at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historical Shrine in Baltimore, Maryland. PBS's History Detectives interviewed the ANTIQUES ROADSHOW guest who brought in this American treasure. You can see the segment from episode 1009 on the History Detectives website.

    Haviland Sandoz Tea Set, ca. 1920

    Appraised on July 13, 2002 by David Lackey | Hot Springs, Arkansas
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser David Lackey for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000 (Decreased)

    1883 Dominick & Haff Silver Tea Set

    Appraised on August 10, 2002 by Christopher Hartop | Charlotte, South Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Eric Silver for an updated appraisal in today's market. The original appraiser, Christopher Hartop, was not available.

    • Current Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000 (Unchanged)

    18th-Century Dutch Silver-Mounted Tanach

    Appraised on June 16, 2007 by Kerry Shrives | Baltimore, Maryland
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $10,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Kerry Shrives for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $10,000 (Unchanged)

    American Waltham Watch Co. Pocket Watch, ca. 1887

    Appraised on August 4, 2007 by Kevin Zavian | Spokane, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Kevin Zavian for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,000 (Unchanged)

    Signed Beatles Program, ca. 1963

    Appraised on August 18, 2007 by Philip Weiss | Las Vegas, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Phil Weiss for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000 (Increased)

    1937 Clyfford Still Oil Painting

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Alasdair Nichol | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $500,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Alasdair Nichol for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $500,000 (Unchanged)

    Louis Comfort Tiffany Necklace, ca. 1915

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Christie Romero | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $70,000 - $90,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Gloria Lieberman for an updated appraisal in today's market. The original appraiser, Christie Romero, died in 2009.

    • Current Appraised Value: $70,000 - $90,000 (Unchanged)

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Christie Romero discusses the retail value of this ca. 1915 necklace, noting that, "... not only is it signed 'Tiffany & Co.' ... looking at the workmanship here tells me that the work is by Louis Comfort Tiffany." What Romero meant by this was not that Tiffany had personally crafted the necklace — a jeweler would have made the piece — but rather that Tiffany had designed and supervised its creation, a fact that enhances the value of the necklace considerably.

    1862 Sharps & Hankins Rifle Serial No. 1

    Appraised on June 28, 2008 by Rafael Eledge | Dallas, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Rafael Eledge for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 (Unchanged)

    Royal Doulton Sung Ware Bowl, ca. 1930

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Stuart Slavid | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Stuart Slavid for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    1960 Katharine Hepburn Original Watercolor

    Appraised on August 23, 2008 by Kathleen Guzman | Hartford, Connecticut
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Kathleen Guzman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000 (Unchanged)

    Crandall Hobby Horse, ca. 1880

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Noel Barrett | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $1,600 - $2,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Noel Barrett for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,600 - $2,000 (Unchanged)

    Mughal Indian Reversible Necklace, ca. 1900

    Appraised on August 1, 2009 by Peter Shemonsky | Phoenix, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Peter Shemonsky for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000 (Unchanged)

    1990 Wayne Thiebaud Pen & Ink Drawing

    Appraised on August 15, 2009 by Todd Weyman | San Jose, California
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Todd Weyman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $40,000 (Increaased)

    Roger Broders Dunkerque Travel Poster, ca. 1930

    Appraised on August 15, 2009 by Nicholas Lowry | San Jose, California
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Lowry for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $20,000 (Unchanged)

    Austrian Majolica Vase, ca. 1900

    Appraised on June 12, 2010 by Nicholas Dawes | San Diego, California
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $2,500

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Dawes for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000 (Decreased)

    French Regency Gilt Bronze Plateau, ca. 1825

    Appraised on June 26, 2010 by John Hays | Billings, Montana
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000 - $70,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser John Hays for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $50,000 - $70,000 (Unchanged)

    1963 & 1966 Green Bay Packers Signed Footballs

    Appraised on August 7, 2010 by Mike Gutierrez | Des Moines, Iowa
    Original Appraised Value: $7,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Mike Gutierrez for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $7,000 (Unchanged)

    Update April 4, 2011:
    After this appraisal aired in February 2011, we received a correction from a viewer saying the second Packer football ("The Duke") was signed by the 1965 team, rather than the 1966 team. This eagle-eyed football fan spotted two signatures on the ball by players who were not on the 1966 team: Allen Jacobs and Dan Grimm.

    We followed up with appraiser Mike Gutierrez, who added, "The important thing is '66 and '65 were both championship years, and the appraisal value would be the same either way."

    1904 Van Briggle Vase & Expo Medal

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by David Rago |
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000

    Update December 17, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Lowry for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000 (Unchanged)

    Update March 19, 2012:
    After this segment aired, we received an email from a viewer, who pointed out that appraiser David Rago misspoke when he referred to the 1904 World's Fair as the "St. Louis Purchase Exposition." The 1904 fair celebrated the centennial of the purchase of Louisiana and should be referred to as either the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, the St. Louis World's Fair, or simply the 1904 World's Fair.

    Rago was also mistaken when he stated that St. Louis had held a world's fair every year. While the city of St. Louis did hold an annual exposition from the 1850s until 1902, those expos were meant to showcase agricultural and technical exhibitions from around the city. In 1903, with the World's Fair scheduled to come to St. Louis (although it ended up being postponed and didn't actually take place until 1904), the annual city expo was superseded by the much larger international event.

    Update January 23, 2012:
    Further research confirms that this Van Briggle "Climbing for Honey" vase did in fact win a bronze medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. After taping this segment, appraiser David Rago followed up with a colleague at the St. Louis Art Museum, who had access to the full 1904 Exposition records. The records revealed that a bronze medal was awarded to Van Briggle's "No. 914 Tall vase with modelled bears, green glaze." As Rago mentions in his appraisal, confirming this relationship between the vase and medal adds significantly to the value of the piece, which he says would now be between $30,000 and $40,000 at auction.

    The Expo records also revealed one more important detail: the designer of the vase was actually a man named George B. Young. Why would a Van Briggle vase, bearing the trademark double "A" signature of Artus and Anne Van Briggle, be attributed to a different designer? Rago explained that Van Briggle pottery was molded, rather than hand-thrown, consequently, "Artus designed pieces that others, like his wife, may have finished, and vice versa." He went on to say that the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition would have been a very important show for Artus — and, as it turns out, his last — so he probably wanted to make sure it represented the best pottery produced bearing his name.

    What is particularly interesting about discovering George B. Young's connection to the vase, however, is that Young was actually the great-grandfather of the vase's present-day owner, Todd, who brought the piece to the June 2011 Roadshow event in Eugene. The owner was incredibly surprised to learn of his great-grandfather's connection to the piece. Family lore dictated that the piece had been given to Todd's great-great-grandfather, Harvey Otis Young, by a mutual friend he shared with Artus Van Briggle. Todd had no idea that that "friend" of Van Briggle's was actually a designer for the famed potter and also his great-grandfather, George.

    Austrian "Naughty" Cat Bronze, ca. 1900

    Appraised on June 12, 1999 by Gary Piattoni | Birmingham, Alabama
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Gary Piattoni for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,000 (Unchanged)

    Reproduction Colima Ceramic Dog

    Appraised on July 10, 1999 by John Buxton | Salt Lake City, Utah
    Original Appraised Value: $150 - $200

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser John Buxton for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $150 - $200 (Unchanged)

    Gong Bell Manufacturing Company "Ding Dong" Bell Toy

    Appraised on July 8, 2000 by Bill Bertoia | Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Original Appraised Value: $3,500 - $4,500

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Noel Barrett for an updated appraisal in today's market. The original appraiser, Bill Bertoia, died in 2008.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000 (Decreased)

    19th-Century Spaniel Figures

    Appraised on August 5, 2000 by Daniel Buck Soules | St. Louis, Missouri
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Daniel Buck Soules for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,200 - $1,800 (Decreased)

    Émile Gallé Faience Cat, ca. 1890

    Appraised on July 14, 2001 by Nicholas Dawes | New York, New York
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Dawes for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,500 - $3,500 (Increased)

    1835 Francis Calcraft Turner Painting

    Appraised on July 14, 2001 by Peter Fairbanks
    | New York, New York
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $16,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Peter Fairbanks for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000 (Decreased)

    Carved Table

    Appraised on August 18, 2001 by Alexis Yates | Indianapolis, Indiana
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $8,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser J. Michael Flanigan for an updated appraisal in today's market. The original appraiser, Alexis Yates, was unavailable.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,500 - $5,000 (Decreased)

    William Bromley Pitcher, ca. 1845

    Appraised on June 15, 2002 by J. Garrison Stradling | Seattle, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $2,800 - $3,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser J. Garrison Stradling for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000 (Decreased)

    Calligraphic Drawings, ca. 1885

    Appraised on June 22, 2002 by Carl Crossman | Cleveland, Ohio
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $7,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Carl Crossman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $4,500 - $5,500 (Decreased)

    Buster Brown Shoes Advertisement Sign, ca. 1919

    Appraised on July 12, 2003 by Timothy Luke | Savannah, Georgia
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $10,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Timothy Luke for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $5,000 - $10,000 (Unchanged)

    Painted Collector's Cabinet, ca. 1900

    Appraised on July 10, 2004 by Anne Igelbrink | Omaha, Nebraska
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Anne Igelbrink for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,000 (Unchanged)

    Ives Clockwork "Kitten in a Can," ca. 1885

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Eric Alberta | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Eric Alberta for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000 (Decreased)

    Alberta notes that a similar "kitten in a can" appeared at a November 2011 sale and sold for $3,250, plus buyer's premium, against a $2,000 to $4,000 estimate. The sale description said that it appeared in the Ives 1893 catalogue as "Mechanical Peek-A-Boo."

    20th-Century Sporting Motif Reverse Crystal Jewelry

    Appraised on August 13, 2005 by Virginia Salem | Los Angeles, California
    Original Appraised Value: $3,500

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Virginia Salem for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $5,000 (Increased)

    Roseville "Ivory" Dog Figurine, ca. 1932

    Appraised on June 30, 2007 by Suzanne Perrault | Orlando, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Suzanne Perreault for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $750 (Decreased)

    19th-Century British Dog Portrait

    Appraised on July 14, 2007 by Colleene Fesko | San Antonio, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $18,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Colleene Fesko for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $12,000 - $18,000 (Unchanged)

    Fesko adds, "While a solidly 19th-century picture (a period that has taken a beating in the recent economic downturn) and by an unknown artist, the high quality of the painting and consistently desirable subject ultimately rule the day. Images of our pets continue to create eager 'tail-wagging' in the market."

    John Emms Oil Painting, ca. 1890

    Appraised on July 12, 2008 by Alan Fausel | Wichita, Kansas
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $30,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Alan Fausel for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $15,000 - $30,000 (Unchanged)

    Minton Landseer Plates, ca. 1875

    Appraised on August 9, 2008 by David Lackey | Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Original Appraised Value: $5,500 - $8,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser David Lackey for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $4,500 - $5,500 (Decreased)

    1909 Theophile Steinlen "Summer Cat" Color Lithograph

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Todd Weyman | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $12,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Todd Weyman for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 - $12,000 (Unchanged)

    20th Century En Tremblant Pin

    Appraised on July 25, 2009 by Rosalie Sayyah | Denver, Colorado
    Original Appraised Value: $300 - $400

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Rosalie Sayyah for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $300 - $400 (Unchanged)

    Walter Anderson Pottery Cat, ca. 1945

    Appraised on August 1, 2009 by David Rago | Phoenix, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $20,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser David Rago for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $12,500 - $17,500

    Rago adds: "Shearwater pottery has only gained in value since Hurricane Katrina not only leveled the studio in Gulf Port, but destroyed much of their surviving work as well. This cat is an exceptional piece and, even though it is slip-cast, the coloring elevates it beyond most of the few remaining examples. I narrowed my price range from my original estimate [$10,000 - $20,000] once I was able to establish that it was indeed Shearwater, and I was able to raise the lower end of my valuation as well. It also could well do in excess of this number in a competitive environment."

    Kleinert's Waterproof Baby Pants Display, ca. 1905

    Appraised on August 1, 2009 by Noel Barrett | Phoenix, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Noel Barrett for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,000 - $3,000 (Decreased)

    Barrett adds, "It is always hard to guess the market — I had estimated one of these last year for $1,000 to $2,000, and it only brought $300 at auction."

    1971 Clementine Hunter Painting

    Appraised on July 10, 2010 by Ken Farmer | Miami Beach, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Ken Farmer for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $6,000 (Unchanged)

    Farmer adds, "Auction prices for similar pieces in the last two years are in the $4,000 to $5,000 range — not counting the buyer’s premium, which is 15 to 20 percent in most cases."

    William Zorach Carved Wood Sculpture of a Cat, ca.1930

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Eric Silver |
    Original Appraised Value: $25,000 - $35,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Eric Silver for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $35,000 - $45,000 (Increased)

    1963 Fred Machetanz Oil Painting

    Appraised on July 9, 2011 by Nan Chisholm |
    Original Appraised Value: $25,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Nan Chisholm for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $25,000 (Unchanged)

    Arthur Rackham Ink Illustration, ca. 1920

    Appraised on August 6, 2011 by Laura Crockett |
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $6,000

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Laura Crockett for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Decreased)

    Haida Argillite Figure, ca. 1860

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by John Buxton |
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $10,000

    Update September 24, 2012:
    After this segment aired a viewer wrote in to point out that the archipelago appraiser John Buxton referred to as the Queen Charlotte Islands, located off the northern coast of British Columbia, are now officially referred to as Haida Gwaii, meaning "Islands of the People."

    Continental Majolica Plates, ca. 1900

    Appraised on August 13, 2011 by David Rago |
    Original Appraised Value: $200 - $300

    Update September 24, 2012:
    A resourceful viewer named Andrea contacted us after this appraisal segment aired, saying she had found what looks to be the answer to the question "Who made these plates?"

    Andrea wrote: "It is the mark of the Moravian Gebrüder Schütz, and evidently was used from 1854-1900, according to this site: www.porcelainmarksandmore.com." We checked back with appraiser David Rago, who agreed. "It sounds right on the money to me. ... They are certainly late-19th century (though I'm surprised the company closed in 1900. I’d have really guessed 1900-1910.)"

    Rago added that this information does not change the plates' estimated value of $200 to $300 for the pair.

    1913 Louis Agassiz Fuertes Drawings & Sketches

    Appraised on June 18, 2011 by Colleene Fesko |
    Original Appraised Value: $11,000 - $17,000

    Update July 9, 2012:
    After this segment aired a representative from the American Museum of Natural History in New York City emailed us regarding this Louis Agassiz Fuertes collection. After following up with their owner, Brian, and putting him in touch with the museum's ornithology department, we subsequently learned that Brian decided to donate Fuertes' sketchbooks to the museum, where they are now housed.

    George Luks Watercolor, ca. 1925

    Appraised on August 1, 2009 by Debra Force | Phoenix, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $75,000

    Update July 2, 2012:
    After this segment originally aired some viewers emailed us to say that, contrary to what appraiser Debra Force said, Williamsport is not considered to be a part Pennsylvania's "Coal Country," even though on the map it does sit in between two of the state's most prominent coal fields.

    Nampeyo Hopi Seed Jar, ca. 1915

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Ted Trotta |
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000

    Update July 2, 2012:
    In this segment, appraiser Ted Trotta incorrectly stated that the Sikyatki were a "1,000-, 1,500-year-old" tribe. In fact the Sikyatki tribe date to between 1300 and 1700 AD.

    Abdur Rahman Chughtai "Rashmiri Woodcutter" Etching, ca. 1930

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Anne Henry |
    Original Appraised Value: $7,000 - $10,000

    Update July 2, 2012:
    During this segment, appraiser Anne Henry misspoke when she said that Pakistani artist Abdur Rahman Chughtai, who died in 1975, was born "just before the turn of the 19th century." Chughtai was born in 1897, just before the turn of the 20th century.

    1903-1905 The Doves Press Bible

    Appraised on July 9, 2011 by Ken Gloss |
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update March 26, 2012:
    Appraiser Ken Gloss would like to add that Thomas James Cobden-Sanderson founded the Doves Press with Emery Walker around 1900. Further research shows that Walker was in charge of the technical side of the press, while Cobden-Sanderson had creative control over what was published and final designs. The two were involved in a bitter dispute over ownership of the press' distinctive type font. In 1916, Codben-Sanderson is said to have taken the dramatic step of throwing bits of the type into the River Thames. The Emery Walker Library in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England claims to have the only remaining example of the Doves Press type in its collection — a block used to print a Christmas card in 1900.

    Evelyn Rumsey Cary "Woman Suffrage" Poster, ca. 1905

    Appraised on August 23, 2008 by Nicholas Lowry | Hartford, Connecticut
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update March 19, 2012:
    Thanks to a knowledgeable viewer, we have a correction: Evelyn Rumsey Cary was from Buffalo, New York, not Rochester. The same viewer also suggested that the building behind the woman in the poster could be based on the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. The two buildings are certainly very similar in appearance — see for yourself!

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment appraiser Nicholas Lowry examines a ca. 1905 "Woman Suffrage" poster by Evelyn Rumsey Cary. After this episode's broadcast a viewer wrote in to say that the original painting on which this poster is based is on permanent display at Florida International University's Wolfsonian museum in Miami Beach.

    1896 Wisconsin National Guard Presentation Sword

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Rafael Eledge |
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update March 12, 2012:
    After this segment aired, appraiser Rafael Eledge caught a mistake in his appraisal of this presentation sword. Eledge says that the Ashland Rifles did in fact serve in the same regiment (the 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Company "L") during the Spanish War as they had during the Civil War.

    Dorothy Carleton Smyth Paintings, ca. 1905

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Beth Szescila |
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $18,000

    Update March 12, 2012:
    In this segment appraiser Beth Szescila says that Dorothy Carleton Smyth worked as a set designer as well as designing costumes. After reviewing her transcript of the taping, Szecila reported to us that she could not find any evidence substantiating that Smyth designed sets, and that that detail should be removed; however, we failed to make the correction to the final edited version of her appraisal for the Eugene Hour 2 show. We regret the error.

    Webb Peachblow Glass Vase, ca. 1880

    Appraised on August 13, 2011 by Kathleen Bailey |
    Original Appraised Value: $2,500 - $3,500

    Update March 12, 2012:
    After this appraisal aired on February 13, 2012, a viewer wrote in questioning the appraiser's attribution of Webb as having made the vase. The viewer's opinion was that the vase is in fact an example of Bohemian glass made by Harrach.

    Part of appraiser Kathy Bailey's initial research was based on published academic line drawings for works of this shape that had been made in England. Bailey allowed that the latest definitive academic research was not available at the time this appraisal was recorded. She also noted that it was possible that the vase was by Harrach of Bohemia, saying, "Heated arguments have persisted over the years regarding the Webb attribution. ... [I'm] looking forward to new definitive scholarship which may be available in 2012." She added that in her opinion, the approximate age and value of the vase remains the same.

    1885 Kiowa Beaded Toy Baby Carrier

    Appraised on August 13, 2011 by Bruce Shackelford |
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $12,000

    Update February 27, 2012:
    During his appraisal of this Kiowa toy baby cradle, Tribal Arts expert Bruce Shackleford was surprised to discover the name of the artist scribbled on the back of the toy. "It's very unusual to have a name associated with the piece," Shackleford explained.

    Shackleford was unable to make out the name in its entirety, but he told Janet, the toy's owner, that if she wanted to pursue it further, "[she] could take that name and run it down in the Indian Rolls and find out who this woman was."

    But what exactly are the Indian Rolls and what might Janet discover there?

    The Indian Census Rolls, which span from 1885 to 1940, were the result of an 1884 Act of Congress that required agents in charge of Indian reservations to submit population records to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Although the records were incomplete — there aren't census records for every reservation or group of Indians for every year — and the data from record-to-record varied, the Indian Census Rolls are the most thorough archive of U.S. Native American populations that exist for that time period.

    Generally, the records include the English and/or Indian name of the person, roll number, age or date of birth, sex, and relationship to head of family. Using these categories, and with a bit of time and effort, Janet might be able to narrow down the list of records and determine the name of her toy's creator. An initial search of the Rolls by ROADSHOW did not uncover any additional information about the partial name Shackleford found on the toy, but more in-depth research could yield better results.

    The records are maintained by the U.S. National Archives and can be accessed —  among other ways — free of charge at a number of National Archive facilities across the country, or through online subscription services such as Ancestry.com or hertiagequest.com, which have digitized many of the records.

    To explore the records yourself, visit the National Archives to get started:

    www.archives.gov/research/census/research.html

    Mid-19th-Century Haida Bowl and Spoons

    Appraised on June 4, 2011 by Anthony Slayter-Ralph |
    Original Appraised Value: $14,500 - $17,000

    Update February 20, 2012:
    After this segment aired, we received an email from an astute viewer who pointed out that there is no such thing as a "mountain goat sheep." Appraiser Anthony Slayter-Ralph agreed, saying, "These spoons are made from the horn of a mountain goat."

    The same viewer also questioned Slayter-Ralph's pronunciation of the word "eulochon." Slayter-Ralph's response: "This might be a case of 'you say to-may-toe and I say to-mah-toe' — given that I am a Brit. The word comes from the Chinook word 'uthlecan.' It can be pronounced 'oolakon'; it is also pronounced 'hooligan.' This might be a case of regional pronunciation. I am happy to be corrected."

    Early 19th-Century George Washington Mantel Clock

    Appraised on August 21, 1999 by Gordon Converse | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000 - $80,000

    Update January 30, 2012:
    A viewer recently pointed out that two different appraisals of clocks marked "Dubuc" posited differing information about Dubuc's role in the clocks' manufacture. One appraisal was from our Season 12 "Politically Collect" episode with appraiser Gordon Converse, and the second was from the Season 11 "Salt Lake City, Hour 2" with appraiser John Delaney.

    Delaney clarified the point saying: "Was Dubuc responsible for making the entire clock? Most likely not." However, "The reality is that he must have had a major role in the form's construction or creation. He is credited as being a bronzier in several listings, but he was partly responsible for assembling the form as a whole and bringing [the clocks] into this country, and in many instances is credited with making this form."

    Update December 6, 2010:
    After a November broadcast of this segment, which originally aired in February 2000, a viewer wrote in to say that the appraiser misstated the location of George Washington's farewell address to his officers at the conclusion of the Revolutionary War. General Washington bade farewell to his officers not in Philadelphia, but at Fraunces Tavern in New York City on December 4, 1783. He then traveled to Annapolis, Maryland, and resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

    French Mantle Clock, ca. 1815

    Appraised on June 24, 2006 by John Delaney | Salt Lake City, Utah
    Original Appraised Value: $40,000 - $50,000

    Update January 30, 2012:
    A viewer recently pointed out that two different appraisals of clocks marked "Dubuc" posited differing information about Dubuc's role in the clocks' manufacture. One appraisal was from our Season 12 "Politically Collect" episode with appraiser Gordon Converse, and the second was from the Season 11 "Salt Lake City, Hour 2" with appraiser John Delaney.

    Delaney clarified the point saying: "Was Dubuc responsible for making the entire clock? Most likely not." However, "The reality is that he must have had a major role in the form's construction or creation. He is credited as being a bronzier in several listings, but he was partly responsible for assembling the form as a whole and bringing [the clocks] into this country, and in many instances is credited with making this form."

    Early 18th-Century Mughal Embroidery

    Appraised on August 9, 2008 by Peter Pap | Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000

    Update January 30, 2012:
    Appraiser Peter Pap wrote to us with a correction to a fact in his appraisal of this object. The embroidery has a cotton ground, rather than a linen ground.

    Tekke "Animal Tree" Asmalyk Rug, ca. 1800

    Appraised on June 12, 2010 by Peter Pap | San Diego, California
    Original Appraised Value: $125,000 - $150,000

    Update January 26, 2012:
    Appraiser Peter Pap wrote to us with a correction to a fact in his appraisal of this object. The rug's warp threads are most likely sheep's wool, rather than goat hair.

    Update December 23, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Peter Pap for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $150,000 - $200,000 (Increased)

    "Lasso 'em Bill" Cowboy Set

    Appraised on June 24, 2000 by Noel Barrett | Charleston, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $800 - $1,200

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Noel Barrett for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $800 - $1,200 (Unchanged)

    First Impression Pierre Renoir Etching

    Appraised on July 22, 2000 by Todd Weyman | Las Vegas, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Todd Weyman for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,500 (Increased)

    1768 Family Bible & Early 19th-Century Children's Book

    Appraised on July 26, 2003 by Ian Ehling | Chicago, Illinois
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Ian Ehling for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000 (Unchanged)

    Hubley Orange "Harley-Davidson" Toy Motorcycle, ca. 1930

    Appraised on August 14, 2004 by Andy Ourant | Reno, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $2,500

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Andy Ourant for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,000- $1,500 (Decreased)

    Babe Ruth & Lou Gehrig Signed Shoe

    Appraised on August 21, 2004 by Simeon Lipman | Portland, Oregon
    Original Appraised Value: $500 - $700

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Simeon Lipman for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $500 - $700 (Unchanged)

    Folk Art Portrait of a Girl and Her Cat, ca. 1830

    Appraised on August 21, 2004 by Marybeth Keene | Portland, Oregon
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Marybeth Keene for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $25,000 - $35,000 (Unchanged)

    Keene notes that she consulted with a few other folk art dealers about the value of the painting as well. "We all feel it would still bring $25,000 to 35,000 at retail," she said. "That cat is still wonderful!"

    Child's Chaps & Spurs, ca. 1910

    Appraised on July 16, 2005 by Bruce Shackelford | Houston, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $2,400 - $3,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Bruce Shackelford for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $3,500 (Increased)

    Shackelford explains that despite the market in general, "Good stuff hasn't gone down [in value], and this is good stuff." He also noted that a book has recently come out about the spur maker, Joe Bianchi, who, according to Shackelford, "made spurs for everybody who was anybody and everybody who was nobody in south Texas."

    Edith Parsons "Turtle Baby" Fountain

    Appraised on July 16, 2005 by Eric Silver | Houston, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $35,000 - $40,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Eric Silver for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $35,000 - $40,000 (Unchanged)

    1924 Paul Troubetzkoy Sculpture

    Appraised on August 13, 2005 by Kerry Shrives | Los Angeles, California
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Kerry Shrives for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 (Increased)

    1869 "Little Women" Books

    Appraised on July 29, 2006 by Stephen Massey | Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Stephen Massey for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    Child's Swan Sleigh, ca. 1880

    Appraised on July 29, 2006 by Allan Katz | Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000 - $30,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Allan Katz for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $50,000 - $60,000 (Increased)

    Katz explains, "This wonderful piece is so special that it would go against the general lower valuations placed on ordinary objects in today's economic climate."

    Jumeau Doll with Clothing & Booklet, ca. 1880

    Appraised on June 30, 2007 by Marshall Martin | Orlando, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $18,000 - $20,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    After this appraisal aired we received an email from a viewer telling us there is a translation of the booklet that accompanied the Jumeau doll in "Spinning Wheel's Complete Book of Dolls," edited by Albert Christian Revi. The booklet features a letter from the doll to her child owner in which the doll expresses her compulsion to destroy "ugly and ridiculous" German dolls of inferior quality:

    "I am not a fighter but I assure you, Mademoiselle, that if I find myself one day face to face with one of them, I will break it like glass, this cardboard baby that smells of tallow and wax. Ah! I am a true French baby!"

    So now we know: the picture appraiser Marshall Martin referenced is an image of the Jumeau baby doll stomping on another doll!

    Action Kewpie Doll "Down on His Luck", ca. 1915

    Appraised on June 30, 2007 by Richard Wright | Orlando, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $5,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    Richard Wright, who originally appraised this object, died in 2009. We contacted appraiser Marshall Martin for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $3,500 (Decreased)

    Martin notes that the market for Kewpie dolls, as with many antique dolls, has softened since the taping of this appraisal in 2007.

    Dr. Seuss "Cat in the Hat" Lunch Box Art, ca. 1970

    Appraised on July 14, 2007 by Kathleen Guzman | San Antonio, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Kathleen Guzman for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $26,400 (Increased)

    Guzman informed us that this Dr Seuss lunchbox art was sold at the Bonhams Books & Manuscripts Auction in October of 2008 for $24,000, plus a 20 percent buyer’s premium.

    Folk Miniature Portrait, ca. 1830

    Appraised on August 4, 2007 by Ken Farmer | Spokane, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Ken Farmer for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000 (Unchanged)

    1819 Philadelphia School Girl Silk Embroidered Picture

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Nancy Druckman | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $60,000 - $80,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Nancy Druckman for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $60,000 - $80,000 (Unchanged)

    Druckman notes, "The market for this silk-embroidered [picture] has remained the same since it was appraised in 2008."

    Two Ludwig Bemelmans Drawings

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Stuart Whitehurst | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $17,000 - $20,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Stuart Whitehurst for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $18,000 - $20,000 (Increased)

    1956 Jackie Robinson & Roy Campanella Signed Photograph

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Leila Dunbar | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $10,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Leila Dunbar for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000 (Increased)

    Dunbar notes, "Given the rise of values for iconic pieces in the sports memorabilia market over the past three years and the uniqueness of this particular photograph, I would now update my original appraisal to $10,000-$15,000."

    Dionne Quintuplet Dolls & Rocker, ca. 1935

    Appraised on July 12, 2008 by Marshall Martin | Wichita, Kansas
    Original Appraised Value: $2,500

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Marshall Martin for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 (Decreased)

    Martin explains that since this appraisal in 2008, "[Dionne Quintuplet] dolls have taken a big dive in value."

    18th-Century American Walnut Cradle

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Leslie Keno | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $800 - $1,200

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Ken Farmer for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market. Leslie Keno, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

    • Current Appraised Value: $600 - $800 (Decreased)

    Caughley Porcelain "Toy" Service, ca. 1780

    Appraised on July 11, 2009 by Nicholas Dawes | Madison, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Dawes for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 (Unchanged)

    Steiff Bear, ca. 1910

    Appraised on July 11, 2009 by Floyd Jones | Madison, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $1,200 - $1,500

    Update December 19, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Floyd Jones for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $800 - $1,000 (Decreased)

    19th-Century Simon Troger-Style Ivory & Boxwood Figures

    Appraised on June 6, 2009 by Reid Dunavant | Atlantic City, New Jersey
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000 - $75,000

    Update November 21, 2011:
    Since this segment first aired in February 2010, these ivory and boxwood carvings have been confirmed as the work of Austrian sculptor Simon Troger.

    Scott Defrin, founder of The European Decorative Arts Company, and a Troger expert, verified the attribution in his article "Recognizing the Hand of Simon Troger (1683-1768)," published in a 2011 collection of essays on German sculptural studies.

    While watching Reid Dunavant's appraisal of the carvings on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, Defrin says he recognized the figures as pieces of Troger's combination groups ( Kombinationsgruppen ) — sets of carvings, usually from a specific scene, that were intended to be displayed together. The figures had several key characteristics of Troger's work, such as the combination of boxwood and ivory, the detail of the figures' rag clothing, and the general quality of the work.

    Defrin says he was particularly surprised to discover these Troger carvings, both because Troger's work seldom comes up on the U.S. market, and "because they have survived together intact as a group." With the Troger attribution verified, Dunavant confirmed that the figures would be worth $100,000 to $150,000 each.

    To learn more about Defrin's findings on these Troger pieces and other works that have recently been attributed to Troger, see Defrin's full article (PDF):

    "Recognizing the Hand of Simon Troger (1683 - 1768)," by Scott Defrin.

    From Barocke Kunststuckh, Sculpture Studies in Honour of Christian Theuerkauff edited by Regine Marth and Marjorie Trusted, Hirmer Verlag, Munich, 2011.

    Associated American Artists Prints, ca. 1940

    Appraised on July 24, 2010 by Betty Krulik | Biloxi, Mississippi
    Original Appraised Value: $48,000

    Update November 21, 2011:
    In this segment, the Associated American Artists is identified as having been formed in 1935; in fact, Reeves Lewenthal formed the association in 1934.

    Colonial Silver Mug by Jacob Hurd

    Appraised on June 15, 1996 by Christopher Hartop | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Ron Bourgeault for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market. Christopher Hartop, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $7,500 (Decreased)

    Korean Bowl, Chopsticks & Spoon from the Koryo Dynasty

    Appraised on August 19, 2000 by Lark Mason | Boston, Massachusetts
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500 - $3,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Lark Mason for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 - $3,000 (Unchanged)

    Levi Wells Prentice Painting

    Appraised on July 14, 2001 by Alasdair Nichol | New York, New York
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000 - $30,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Alasdair Nichol for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $18,000 - $25,000 (Decreased)

    Nichol goes on to note that this Prentice painting sold at auction in 2003 for $22,800, but today he would place it in a slightly lower range than his original 2001 appraisal.

    Newcomb College Chocolate Set, ca. 1905

    Appraised on July 12, 2003 by David Rago | Savannah, Georgia
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000 - $60,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser David Rago for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000 (Decreased)

    Early 20th-Century Advertising Cabinet & Containers

    Appraised on July 26, 2003 by Timothy Luke | Chicago, Illinois
    Original Appraised Value: $800 - $1,200

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Timothy Luke for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $800 - $1,200 (Unchanged)

    1805 Paul Storr Cruet Set

    Appraised on August 9, 2003 by Frank Boos | Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    Frank Boos, who originally appraised this object, died in 2006. We contacted appraiser Ronald Bourgeault for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000 (Unchanged)

    Bourgeault notes that two similar Paul Storr cruet sets have sold at auctions in the U.S. during the past year, one for $9,400 and the other for $10,600.

    Meat Serving Cart, ca. 1930

    Appraised on August 14, 2004 by Eric Silver | Reno, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Eric Silver for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,000 (Unchanged)

    Mahogany Knife Box, ca. 1800

    Appraised on August 14, 2004 by John Hays | Reno, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $8,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser John Hays for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $5,000 - $8,000 (Unchanged)

    American Wafer Iron, ca. 1812

    Appraised on August 21, 2004 by William Guthman | Portland, Oregon
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    William Guthman, who originally appraised this object, died in 2006. We contacted appraiser J. Michael Flanigan for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $2,500 - $3,000 (Increased)

    Flanigan goes on to note that the increase in value for this iron, which bears the Great Seal of the United States, can be attributed to a strong appetite for patriotic material, since the market for kitchen collectibles is currently weak.

    Cordials, ca. 1875

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Kathleen Bailey | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $5,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Kathleen Bailey for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $4,000 (Decreased)

    Civil War Confederate Canteen, Union Veteran Hat & Photo

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Rafael Eledge | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $6,500

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Rafael Eledge for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $6,000 - $6,500 (Unchanged)

    1863 New York Butter Churn

    Appraised on June 25, 2005 by Stephen Fletcher | Tampa, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Stephen Fletcher for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 (Unchanged)

    Russian Imperial Charger

    Appraised on August 13, 2005 by Peter Schaffer | Los Angeles, California
    Original Appraised Value: $65,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Peter Schaffer for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $75,000 (Increased)

    19th-Century Hawaiian Poi Pounders

    Appraised on August 26, 2006 by Anthony Slayter-Ralph | Honolulu, Hawaii
    Original Appraised Value: $13,400 - $17,600

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Anthony Slayter-Ralph for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $13,400 - $17,600 (Unchanged)

    Coalport Dessert Set, ca. 1810

    Appraised on June 16, 2007 by David Lackey | Baltimore, Maryland
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000 - $30,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser David Lackey for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000 (Increased)

    Lackey notes that while he does not believe the market value of this set has significantly increased, based on his subsequent review of some relevant auction records, he believes his original appraisal was too conservative. "The exceptional decoration on this set makes it valuable. Most other dessert sets made by Coalport during this time period would be worth much less than this specific set," he says.

    Otto Prutscher Goblets by Bakalowits

    Appraised on June 30, 2007 by Arlie Sulka | Orlando, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $24,000 - $32,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Arlie Sulka for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $24,000 - $32,000 (Unchanged)

    1925 Punch Pot

    Appraised on July 14, 2007 by Nicholas Dawes | San Antonio, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $400 - $500

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Dawes for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $400 - $500 (Unchanged)

    1766 Carved Drinking Horn

    Appraised on August 18, 2007 by Ken Farmer | Las Vegas, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Ken Farmer for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    According to Farmer: "This is still a great thing. We could find 100-plus powder horns and be lucky to find one drinking horn. ... The market for the top 5 percent of any category is still holding up."

    Cracker Jack Baseball Cards, ca. 1914

    Appraised on July 12, 2008 by Brian Marren | Wichita, Kansas
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Simeon Lipman for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market. Brian Marren, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

    • Current Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000 (Unchanged)

    English Pear-Form Tea Caddy, ca. 1810

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Stuart Whitehurst | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Ron Bourgeault for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market. Stuart Whitehurst, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 (Decreased)

    Moehn Breweriana Poster, ca. 1915

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Nicholas Lowry | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Nicholas Lowry for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $1,500 - $2,000 (Unchanged)

    Lowry notes, "I do not think the value has really changed, although there has been a surge in interest in Breweriana in the past three years."

    Lenticular Advertising Sign, ca. 1920

    Appraised on July 11, 2009 by Kathleen Guzman | Madison, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Kathleen Guzman for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000 (Unchanged)

    Guzman notes, "No change in price. The market for advertising collectibles has become softer and prices have generally declined, but this is still a strong example, and rare."

    Late 19th-Century Enamel Decorated Chinese Silver Box

    Appraised on August 7, 2010 by Stuart Slavid | Des Moines, Iowa
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update November 14, 2011:
    We contacted appraiser Stuart Slavid for an updated appraisal of this object in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $8,000 - $12,000 (Increased)

    Slavid notes, "With the current strength of the Chinese market, as well as silver's huge rise, at auction today [this new estimate] would be appropriate."

    David Crockett Unexecuted Marriage License

    Appraised on June 25, 2005 by Francis Wahlgren | Tampa, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000 - $50,000

    Update November 7, 2011:
    After this segment aired in January 2006, a dispute about who legally owned this Crockett marriage license made news. As of July 2011, the Tennessee Court of Appeals upheld a trial court judgment that sided with Jefferson County in their case against ANTIQUES ROADSHOW guest Margaret V. Smith. It was reported the license was returned to Jefferson County in 2010. To read more about this development, see:

    www.courthousenews.com/2011/08/01/38616.htm

    Eskimo Hunting Helmet, ca. 1820

    Appraised on August 9, 1997 by Donald Ellis | San Francisco, California
    Original Appraised Value: $65,000 - $75,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    Late 19th Century Yup'ik Harpoon Rest

    Appraised on August 1, 1998 by Donald Ellis | Los Angeles, California
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    Diary & Unalakleet Monthly

    Appraised on June 22, 2002 by Francis Wahlgren | Cleveland, Ohio
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $10,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    American Indian Doll & Carvings, ca. 1910

    Appraised on July 10, 2004 by Donald Ellis | Omaha, Nebraska
    Original Appraised Value: $4,800 - $5,800

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    Eskimo Ivory Carving on Russian Box

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Linda Dyer | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable

    The Chukchi and the Siberian Yupik (Eskimo) are indigenous Arctic peoples. The Chukchi mainly reside in Chukotka, the far northeast corner of Siberia.

    Yupik Shaman Spirit Mask, ca. 1900

    Appraised on July 11, 2009 by John Buxton | Madison, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $18,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    19th-Century Eskimo & South Pacific Objects

    Appraised on August 15, 2009 by Anthony Slayter-Ralph | San Jose, California
    Original Appraised Value: $26,000 - $28,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    Grenfell Missionary Rug, ca. 1915

    Appraised on June 26, 2010 by Ken Farmer | Billings, Montana
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $6,000

    Update October 31, 2011:
    A viewer's recent email regarding an appraisal of an Inupiaq cribbage board prompted us to review past appraisals that mentioned Eskimo culture.

    It is ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's intention to use culturally respectful terms when discussing the history of items being appraised on the show. We acknowledge that terms that describe a person or group’s identity regarding race, ethnicity, religion, etc., can change over time or have different meaning to different people. "Eskimo" is a word that has different connotations depending on where you live in the Northern Hemisphere.

    In Canada and Greenland, "Eskimo" has negative connotations and is no longer an accepted term. "Inuit" is preferred, but that term is not commonly used in the United States. In the U.S., "Eskimo" is not considered to be derogatory and is in common usage. "Eskimo" is used when speaking of two main indigenous cultural groups collectively: "Yupik" (a culture group from Western Alaska) and "Inupiat" (a culture group from Northern Alaska and St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea). When one of these groups is being referenced, "Yupik" or "Inupiat" is favored over "Eskimo" by Alaskan Natives.

    The term "Alaskan Natives" includes all indigenous peoples of Alaska: Eskimo, Unangan (Aleut), and American Indian, and is also considered broadly acceptable.

    Update October 31, 2011:
    Shortly after this appraisal aired in April 2011, a couple of viewers wrote in to correct Ken Farmer's classification of the Grenfell missionary rug as "woven." The rug is actually a "hooked" rug, meaning that it was made by pulling loops of fabric through a stiff woven base using a rug hook, rather than being woven on a loom. Another viewer also pointed out that the ca. 1915 date Ken gave in the appraisal was inaccurate, because the particular pattern of the rug appraised was not produced until the mid 1930s. We consulted with Ken, who agreed he misstated the approximate date of the rug's production.

    American Brilliant Period Cut-Glass Base, ca. 1880

    Appraised on August 18, 2007 by Kathleen Bailey | Las Vegas, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $500

    Update October 17, 2011:
    Since this segment first aired in May 2008, appraiser Kathleen Bailey discovered more information about this brilliant period cut-glass pedestal. Bailey found the T.G. Hawkes & Company pedestal pictured in an obscure reprinted catalog from the 1899 Paris Exposition. Rather than being a punch bowl, as Bailey had previously thought, the catalog identifies the pedestal and its matching 14-inch-diameter bowl as a "Center Piece" with the pattern name "Lorraine." It would more likely hold fruit or flowers.

    The retail value for the pedestal alone, in excellent condition, remains the same at $500. Bailey went on to say that if a matching Center Piece bowl were to be found for sale "in exact condition (which is unlikely) … a range of $6,000 to $12,000 (or more) at auction is possible. Matching the two pieces would be quite an accomplishment due to the rarity of the Center Piece."


    Asscher-Cut Diamond Ring, ca. 1915

    Appraised on August 18, 2007 by Adam Patrick | Las Vegas, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $165,000 - $175,000

    Update October 10, 2011:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to say that he thought he had heard appraiser Adam Patrick discussing Birks & Company, the jewelry retailer, in the past tense, as if the company were no longer in business. The company does indeed still exist, but its name has changed. In 2005, Birks joined with another jewelry retailer, Mayors, to become Birks & Mayors Inc.

    1882 Map of Georgia Gold Region

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Christopher Lane | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $1,200 - $1,400

    Update October 10, 2011:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to point out that the first American gold rush did not actually take place in Georgia, as the guest stated in the appraisal, but in North Carolina. We consulted with appraiser Christopher Lane, who confirmed that gold was first discovered in North Carolina in the early 18th century, which ultimately led to the first American gold rush in North Carolina in the early 19th century.

    1910 Hough's "American Woods" 3rd Edition Set

    Appraised on July 25, 2009 by Ken Sanders | Denver, Colorado
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000

    Update October 10, 2011:
    After this segment first aired, appraiser Ken Sanders got in touch to let us know that he now realizes he mispronounced the author's name throughout his appraisal of the American Woods set by R.B. Hough. The correct pronunciation of Hough's name is "huff" rather than "how."

    Update December 23, 2013:
    We contacted appraiser Ken Sanders for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $35,000 - $45,000 (Increased)

    Klondike Gold Rush Memorabilia, ca. 1897

    Appraised on June 26, 2010 by Rosalie Sayyah | Billings, Montana
    Original Appraised Value: $5,565 - $5,570

    Update July 18, 2011:
    In this segment, appraiser Rosalie Sayyah discusses a collection of Klondike Gold Rush memorabilia and mistakenly implies that the Klondike was part of Alaska, rather than Canada's Yukon Territory.

    While there were discoveries of gold in Alaska in the 1870s and 1890s, the specific 1896 discovery that Sayyah refers to was in the Klondike River area, near Dawson City, in the Yukon.

    Civil War Button, Bible & Letter

    Appraised on August 21, 2010 by Rafael Eledge | Washington, DC
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000

    Update July 18, 2011:
    After the August 2010 taping of this segment in Washington, D.C., appraiser Rafael Eledge conducted further research and discovered that the button in this Civil War collection is even rarer than he had initially thought. "As best I can find," Eledge noted, "it is the only non-battlefield-excavated [button] surviving in that size."

    In light of that fact, Rafael said, "Today, I think [the button] could hit above $10,000," and considering the improvement in the market since he first appraised it, Rafael said that he would now recommend insuring the group of items for $15,000.



    William H. D. Koerner Painting, ca. 1935

    Appraised on June 28, 2008 by Nan Chisholm | Dallas, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $150,000

    Update July 11, 2011:
    After this segment aired a viewer emailed to point out that at the beginning of the appraisal, the painting's owner was mistaken in saying that the artist, W.H.D. Koerner, had grown up in Ohio. Koerner actually grew up in Iowa.

    1812 American Needlework Sampler

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Stephen Fletcher | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000 - $30,000

    Update June 27, 2011:
    Since this segment aired, more than one viewer has written in to point out that the letter "J" is absent from the needlework alphabet in this 1812 sampler. We consulted J. Michael Flanigan, one of ROADSHOW's folk art experts, who explained that this is fairly common in samplers from this period and earlier. In the Latin alphabet used by English speakers, the letter J is a relative latecomer, having developed over time as a variant of the letter "I." And although this change was largely complete prior to the 18th century, it is not unusual to see "I" and "J" treated as the same letter when rendering the alphabet.

    1953 James Kenneth Ralston Painting

    Appraised on June 26, 2010 by Alan Fausel | Billings, Montana
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000

    Update June 27, 2011:
    In this segment, appraiser Alan Fausel mistakenly said that the first initial in artist J.K.Ralston's name stood for John. In fact, the "J.K." stands for James Kenneth.

    Marine Corps Transit Theodolite, ca. 1944

    Appraised on July 25, 2009 by Gary Piattoni | Denver, Colorado
    Original Appraised Value: $800 - $1,200

    Update April 4, 2011:
    Shortly after this segment broadcast in April 2010, a viewer wrote to say: "As a graduate of the United States Artillery & Missile Officer Candidate School in 1967 and a former active duty 'Red Leg,' I can tell you that the theodolite was used to 'lay' a battery of howitzers so that they could all hit the same target area when fired as a group."

    We passed on the comment to appraiser Gary Piattoni who confirmed the viewer's comment and responded: "Ultimately it is an exact copy of a typical surveyors’ transit theodolite which would have had many functions, [but] its primary use would have been for artillery."

    Edwardian Cartier Tuxedo Set, ca. 1915

    Appraised on June 12, 2010 by Rosalie Sayyah | San Diego, California
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000

    Update March 21, 2011:
    After this segment aired a viewer emailed to point out that at the top of her appraisal, Rosalie Sayah mistakenly referred to these cufflinks as being 14-karat gold. As she correctly said later in the segment and has since confirmed, the entire Cartier jewelry set is made of 18-karat gold.

    1862 Young Shop-Engraved Colt Pistol

    Appraised on July 14, 2007 by Rafael Eledge | San Antonio, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $12,000 - $15,000

    Update January 24, 2011:
    After this appraisal aired, we received an email from a viewer who felt the descriptive caption on this gun was incorrect, and that instead of being called a pistol it should have been called a revolver. We asked appraiser Rafael Eledge to explain the terms and this was his response: "A pistol may or may not be a revolver, but a revolver has to be a pistol. It is technically a revolving pistol."

    Update November 12, 2012:
    We contacted appraiser Rafael Eledge for an updated appraisal in today's market.

    • Current Appraised Value: $15,000 - $17,000 (Increased)

    Confederate Master & Slave Tintype, ca. 1861

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by C. Wesley Cowan | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $40,000

    Update January 24, 2011:
    After this segment aired, we received several e-mails challenging information presented about the story of Confederate soldier Andrew Chandler and his slave, Silas Chandler. As ROADSHOW knows first-hand, family histories can be hard to confirm.

    The photograph, we subsequently discovered, is more well-known and open to interpretation than we understood when the segment was taped during the summer of 2009. Nevertheless, because the photograph of Silas Chandler and Andrew Chandler remains an important artifact from this period in our nation's history, and a useful catalyst for ongoing discussion about the Civil War, we have decided not to edit the guest's oral history.

    However, we do encourage viewers to explore more about the stories behind the image.

    Appraiser Wes Cowan pursued the story further himself during an investigation for an episode of PBS's History Detectives that aired in October 2011. To find out what he discovered, visit the History Detectives website:

    www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/investigation/chandler-tintype/

    For even more information, below are a selection of websites that present differing opinions on this subject:

    cwmemory.com/2010/03/10/descendents-of-silas-chandler-respond/
    themarginalized.com/2010/03/18/silas-chandler/
    dc2scaggsville.blogspot.com/2010_01_01_archive.html



    Albert Bierstadt Mountain Landscape Oil, ca. 1875

    Appraised on July 10, 2010 by Debra Force | Miami Beach, Florida
    Original Appraised Value: $50,000

    Update January 24, 2011:
    After this appraisal aired, we heard from several viewers who wanted to help solve the mystery of what landscape is depicted in this painting. Some suggested the scene was of the Jungfrau summit among the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. We checked with appraiser Debra Force who confirmed, upon further research, that the painting was indeed the Junfrau. Force also stated the estimated retail value she gave during the appraisal remains the same at $50,000.

    1898 Porceleyne Fles Delft Plaque

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by David Lackey | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $2,000 - $3,000

    Update November 1, 2010:
    After this segment aired we received an e-mail correcting information erroneously given by appraiser David Lackey. As the viewer wrote, "The Elisabeth Bas painting is not produced by Rembrandt van Rijn but by his resident, Ferdinand Bol."

    Lackey agrees, saying, "As noted in the appraisal, the plaque is actually incorrectly marked 'Rembrandt' on the front by the manufacturer, which made the mistake much easier to make. ... The incorrect Rembrandt mark has nothing to do with all the other important facts such as the age, maker, or value."

    1952 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop Guitar

    Appraised on August 18, 2007 by Gary Sohmers | Las Vegas, Nevada
    Original Appraised Value: $20,000

    Update November 1, 2010:
    ANTIQUES ROADSHOW likes to give credit where credit is due, but sometimes just who deserves credit — and how much — is hard to determine. Such is the case with acknowledging the designers of the 1952 Gibson Les Paul "Goldtop" guitar appraised by Gary Sohmers in Las Vegas.

    Sohmers states in the appraisal that Les Paul "helped design a guitar that looks and sounds and plays just like this one. And he got it named after himself because he put so much into it." Just how much Paul contributed to the 1952 Goldtop model is debated. Paul himself claimed the design was a joint effort and that Gibson had used his creative input to create the finished product.

    Gibson's president in the 1950s was Ted McCarty, who is said to have maintained that he and his staff designed the guitar — except for the trapeze tailpiece and the color for which Paul is credited. Although Paul had designed a solid-body guitar in the 1940s (a design that was rejected by Gibson at the time), in this version Paul's star-power, more so than his design ideas, was sought by Gibson to help sell the guitar.

    The Gibson website today seems to take a diplomatic stance: "The year was 1950, and Paul had just signed on as the namesake of Gibson's first electric solidbody, with exclusive design privileges. Working closely with Paul, Gibson forged a relationship that would change popular culture forever. The Gibson Les Paul model — the most powerful and respected electric guitar in history — began with the 1952 release of the Les Paul Goldtop."

    What is generally agreed upon is that the combined efforts of Les Paul, Ted McCarty and his team led to one of the most cherished solid-body electric guitars to date.

    WWII Submarine Flag & Wheel of the U.S.S. Spadefish

    Appraised on August 9, 2008 by Gary Piattoni | Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $5,000

    Update November 1, 2010:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to say she felt the fish depicted on the U.S.S. Spadefish flag was a racist caricature. Appraiser Gary Piattoni did not think this was the case, but it’s a question we felt deserves further attention.

    Karl Zingheim, a graduate of the Naval Academy and staff historian at the U.S.S. Midway Museum, offered the following remarks about how the names for ships were chosen: "By the turn of the 20th century the Navy Department had settled into a naming regimen for the wide variety of ship types technology had created. This system set aside state names for battleships, cities for cruisers, and aquatic animal names for submarines. With the onset of World War II and the huge demand for ships of all kinds, including submarines, this naming system was taxed to come up with names to suit a given ship type and still sound appropriately martial. For submarines, this was a special problem since the Navy was placing orders for hundreds and there was a shortage of popular names for fish. "Spadefish” was likely chosen because it was a fish known to mariners, and had a somewhat martial/aggressive-sounding name."

    The flag's design has been credited to Paul Majoue, who served on the Spadefish. In the book Spadefish: On Patrol with a Top-Scoring WWII Submarine, by Stephen L. Moore, the story of how the flag was made is recounted, though there is no explanation for Majoue's design choices.

    Considering the composition of the Spadefish flag, Zingheim added: "The flag your show displayed is a part of the battle flag phenomena which was the submarine service’s version of what a squadron logo is to aviators. As such, these flags were informal and were often designed by members of the crew with varying degrees of artistic talent and knowledge of what the namesake fish may have looked like. Of all the submarine battle flags I have seen that included fish, one thing that stayed consistent was the inclusion of a white sailor’s hat perched on the creature’s head and the frequent, cartoonish depiction of a generic fish, regardless of what the actual animal looked like. As for the color selection, it appears to be an indirect reference to the ace of spades suit on the playing card, which is traditionally depicted in solid black. Another visual pun is the employment of a spade-type shovel being held by the fish icon, suggesting that he is ready to dig graves for Japanese targets."

    To see images of some other World War II submarine battle flags, see:
    www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq62-1.htm



    Vintage Paperbacks & Original Cover Art

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Ken Gloss | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $3,500

    Update November 1, 2010:
    We received several e-mails about this segment after it aired, including an update from artist Al Jarnow's son, who expanded on his father's notable career. We were able to reach Al Jarnow himself, who wrote of the artwork featured on the show, "I never pursued illustration much beyond that point. As I remember, the art director for that piece griped that I didn't leave enough space in the sky for him to put a title. I've focused the rest of [my] efforts on painting, sculpture, making films/video — experimental and educational (sometimes both)." Jarnow's animated interstitials engaged young minds who watched Sesame Street and 3-2-1 Contact. He has also exhibited works at New York City's Museum of Modern Art and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

    In light of this more complete portrait of the artist, Ken Gloss determined that Jarnow's cover art illustration would have a retail value of $2,500 to $3,500.



    Pocket Map of California, ca. 1853

    Appraised on August 15, 2009 by Martin Gammon | San Jose, California
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update November 1, 2010:
    After this appraisal aired, we received several e-mails from keen-eyed viewers who recognized that Pyramid Lake was indeed correctly labeled on the map. Lake Tahoe was not included on the map.

    Art Deco Jewelry, ca. 1920

    Appraised on August 26, 2006 by Peter Shemonsky | Honolulu, Hawaii
    Original Appraised Value: $145,000 - $197,000

    Update June 28, 2010:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to point out that Peter Shemonsky's translation of "Golconda" was incorrect. It does not mean "mountain of light," but rather "a source of great wealth." The viewer also questioned Shemonsky's reference to the ring's diamond as "D-plus in terms of color." Shemonsky responded saying, "In regard to gemological nomenclature, the viewer is correct in that there is no such thing as a D-plus stone; I was using the terms D-plus and super-white to illustrate that in comparison to a D stone, a Golconda stone appears whiter due to the nature of these stones. Since this may or may not be related to fluorescence it was not mentioned as such, as not all Golconda stones are fluorescent. Some people refer to it as luminousness, and exactly what causes this phenomenon has been a long-debated subject, but all who have handled and are familiar with these stones do agree on one thing: they possess a visual characteristic unlike comparable stones from other regions."

    Celebrity Autographed Letters, ca. 1960

    Appraised on August 1, 2009 by Kathleen Guzman | Phoenix, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000 - $15,000

    Update June 28, 2010:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to question appraiser Kathleen Guzman's conclusion that the Robert F. Kennedy letter on Senate letterhead bears an original signature by his own hand. After further research, Guzman agrees that the RFK letter was more likely signed by autopen, and as such has a lower value, in the range of $200 to $300.

    Frank Lloyd Wright Drawing of the Benjamin Adelman House, ca. 1955

    Appraised on August 1, 2009 by Ken Sanders | Phoenix, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $25,000 - $30,000

    Update May 24, 2010:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to correct the story about the renovation of the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Adelman House in Arizona. She wrote, "My husband and I are former owners of the Adelman House. I would like to clarify what was going on in those photos that were featured. Wright did an add-on to enlarge the house for the Adelmans. Those photos depicted the beginnings of that project; there was nothing wrong with the house. ... We absolutely loved the home."

    1970 Janis Joplin Concert Poster

    Appraised on June 6, 2009 by Gary Sohmers | Atlantic City, New Jersey
    Original Appraised Value: $8,000 - $10,000

    Update May 10, 2010:
    After watching this episode at an event held by his local PBS station, the owner of the poster realized he'd made a mistake regarding the date of the concert and contacted ROADSHOW: "After checking closely, I realized I said 1968, but the actual vintage of the poster is 1970, and after listening to [executive producer Marsha Bemko talk about] the seriousness of the accuracy being pursued, I wanted to let you know so you could make any appropriate changes."

    We checked in with appraiser Gary Sohmers to see how this new information might affect the value he estimated for the poster. He had been contacted by the artist who designed the poster and told us: "The value of the poster appraised on TV remains at the low end of the estimate I stated ($8,000), but has an insurance value still at the high end ($10,000). ... It was in fair to good condition and would be worth more in excellent to mint condition, like the one the artist showed me a picture of."

    World War I Lafayette Flying Corps Group, ca. 1917

    Appraised on June 6, 2009 by Jeffrey Shrader | Atlantic City, New Jersey
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $5,000

    Update May 10, 2010:
    Shortly after this segment broadcast in January 2010, a viewer who was working on a thesis about the Lafayette Escadrille, a World War I-era French air squadron, wrote to ROADSHOW. The viewer pointed out that Charles Trinkard was not a member of the squadron made up mostly of Americans, escadrille N124, commonly referred to as the Lafayette Escadrille. When the Lafayette Escadrille had filled its ranks, later American volunteers were assigned to other French units, but the larger group of American pilots was called the Lafayette Flying Corps. Trinkard was a member of the Lafayette Flying Corps, having been assigned to escadrille N68.

    Appraiser Jeffrey Shrader confirmed the viewer's clarification, but noted: "For most collectors the Lafayette Flying Corps and Escadrille are of equal excitement and the terms are interchangeable in common usage (though the one was indeed a subordinate unit of the other)." Shrader’s $4,000 to $5,000 appraised value remains the same.

    20th-Century Reproduction Indian Tomahawk

    Appraised on July 25, 2009 by John Buxton | Denver, Colorado
    Original Appraised Value: $150 - $250

    Update May 10, 2010:
    In this segment, appraiser John Buxton speculates that based on its shape, the reproduction tomahawk may be made from the jawbone of a horse. After the segment aired, a viewer who said he makes the tomahawks for a living, wrote in to tell us that he recognized the head of the tomahawk was made from the jawbone of a cow, not a horse.

    Harry Bertoia Steel Spray Sculpture with Aluminum Base, ca. 1960

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Robert DuMouchelle | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $10,000

    Update March 22, 2010:
    After this segment aired on January 4, 2010, a viewer wrote in to raise a question about the authenticity of this object, a steel spray sculpture that appraiser Robert DuMouchelle attributed to artist Harry Bertoia. After looking into the issue further and talking again with DuMouchelle and Jon Sollo, another expert who saw the sculpture at the June 2009 Raleigh ROADSHOW event, we’ve determined there is a legitimate question as to whether the object is an authentic example of Bertoia’s work. In order to bring the object to market as a true Bertoia sculpture, a more formal authentication process would need to be conducted, including comparisons with other known works by Bertoia.

    Ngombe Executioner's Sword

    Appraised on July 16, 2005 by John Buxton | Houston, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $600 - $900

    Update February 22, 2010:
    After this segment aired, a viewer wrote in to take issue with appraiser John Buxton's description of the item as a weapon, writing "the real function of this item and numerous items of similar shape is not as a weapon ... new research suggests that these items that were at one time regarded as swords and throwing blades, are in fact ceremonial and/or status item(s)." In reply, Buxton writes, "I certainly should have mentioned that the sword served as a status symbol of power, but so much of what we find in Africa in the way of body adornment, regalia, staffs, weapons, currency, etc., project power and status. ... It should be noted that the power and the status derived from carrying an object that has been called both a Sacrificial Sword and an Executioner’s Sword is the fact that the owner of the weapon had the power of life and death."

    Early 20th-Century Enrico Caruso Memorabilia

    Appraised on June 6, 2009 by Kathleen Guzman | Atlantic City, New Jersey
    Original Appraised Value: $35,000 - $55,000

    Update February 22, 2010:
    In this segment, appraiser Kathleen Guzman refers to one of the guest's items as "the Mishkin photograph of Caruso in one of his preeminent roles as Pagliacci the clown." As one viewer wrote in to point out, however, what Guzman intended to say is that the photo depicts Enrico Caruso in one of his best-known roles, Canio the clown, from the opera entitled Pagliacci.

    Mid-20th Century Western Papua New Guinea Slit Drum

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by John Buxton | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update January 12, 2010:
    In this segment, appraiser John Buxton incorrectly states that the Ramu River is in the western part of the Sepik River. Mr. Buxton noticed the error after the episode’s initial airing and informed us that the Ramu River is actually located in the eastern part of the Sepik River.

    Civil War Artillery Shell, ca. 1863

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Rafael Eledge | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500

    Update January 11, 2010:
    Shortly after this segment broadcast in April 2009, a viewer named J.C. King, who serves with the U.S. Army as Assistant for Munitions and Chemical Matters in the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Environment, Safety and Occupational Health, wrote to ROADSHOW. Mr. King passed along some important advice regarding the safe handling of antique munitions such the Civil War artillery shell appraised by Rafael Eledge in Chattanooga. The guidelines are summarized below.

    - All military munitions are dangerous, regardless of their age or how often they have been handled. Mr. King says his office has records of deaths related to souvenir munitions, including Civil War munitions.  

    - Observe the "Three R's" of explosives safety:
    1) Recognize when you may have encountered a munition.
    2) Retreat. Do not touch, move, or disturb it (or keep one in your house as a door stop!).
    3) Report. Call 911. The police will arrange for a Department of Defense Explosives Ordnance Disposal team or police bomb squad to address the munition. (Normally, such munitions are taken and destroyed by open detonation at a military range or safe location. If the munition is determined to be inert, the owner will be advised and may retain it.)

    Confederate Veteran's Coat, ca. 1900

    Appraised on June 27, 2009 by Rafael Eledge | Raleigh, North Carolina
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000

    Update January 11, 2010:
    In this segment, appraiser Rafael Eledge mistakenly states that the manufacturer of the Confederate veteran's coat, M.C. Lilley & Company, was located in Cincinnati, Ohio. The company was based in Columbus, Ohio. Thanks to a viewer who works for the Grandview Heights Historical Society for pointing out the error.

    1888 "J.F. Porter" Folk Art Desk

    Appraised on July 28, 2007 by Ken Farmer | Louisville, Kentucky
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000

    Update November 4, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Ken Farmer discusses the possible identity of the craftsman who made this Folk Art Desk in 1888, explaining that a majority of his colleagues agreed the name inlaid near the head of this piece, “J.F. Porter,” was that of the maker. After the appraisal aired, two viewers wrote in with some information on Porter.

    Furniture genealogist Cher Haile of Georgia wrote in to tell us that Joseph F. Porter of Danvers, Massachusetts, made the desk. “He was a well-known furniture designer/dealer,” Haile writes, “He was born in 1847, his wife Ella J. was born in 1850, his son Chester L. was born in 1875, and his daughter Bessie P. was born in 1872. They lived and he worked in his shop at #50 Cherry Street for many decades. They were still there in 1900. I do not know how it came to be in Kentucky.” Another viewer credited an Ohio cabinetmaker named John F. Porter as the craftsman.

    While Farmer has since noted that it makes more sense for this piece to have crossed into Kentucky over the Ohio border than to have made it all the way from Massachusetts, he reiterates that the John Porter of Ohio was said to be illiterate — which, if true, might make his connection to this desk doubtful.

    1847 James Henry Beard Oil Painting, "The Illustrious Guest"

    Appraised on June 28, 2008 by Alan Fausel | Dallas, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $300,000 - $500,000

    Update July 15, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Alan Fausel examines "The Illustrious Guest," an 1847 oil painting by James Henry Beard depicting American statesman Henry Clay. After the episode aired, the owner placed the painting on long-term loan to the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, where it is currently on display.

    Thomas Hart Benton Watercolor & Drawing, ca. 1940

    Appraised on July 19, 2008 by Debra Force | Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000

    Update July 15, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Debra Force discusses a ca. 1940 watercolor by Thomas Hart Benton. After the episode aired, a viewer wrote in to say that a similar illustration appears in the 1939 limited edition of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer." Force reviewed the book and believes that the Benton watercolor is possibly another version of this illustration, or a study for it.

    20th-Century Narciso Abeyta (Ha So De) Painting

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Linda Dyer | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $4,000 - $6,000

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Linda Dyer explains that painter Narciso Abeyta was one of a number of Navajos “pressed into service” by the U.S. Marine Corps to be a code talker during World War II. After this episode aired, a viewer wrote in to say that Dyer did not make clear the extent of the code talkers’ service. These Navajos were marines; the military recruited and trained them in the same manner as other marines serving at that time.

    World War II Propaganda Posters

    Appraised on June 17, 2006 by Nicholas Lowry | Tucson, Arizona
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,200

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Nicholas Lowry discusses two "Rosie the Riveter" World War II propaganda posters, at one point referring to Rosie as a "very famous mythological figure in American World War II history." After the appraisal aired, a viewer wrote in to clarify that Rosie was no myth; in fact, the viewer said “Rose” was once her next-door neighbor. In hindsight, Lowry acknowledges that he might have chosen a better word than "mythological," and says he did not intend to suggest Rosie was fictitious, but rather that she became a legendary character in the history of the U.S. war effort. Rosie's image represented the ideal citizen of that era — one who was productive, strong, tough, and patriotic. Rosie the Riveter's real name was Rose Will Monroe. She died in 1997 at the age of 77.

    Zuni Olla (Pot), ca. 1885

    Appraised on July 29, 2006 by John Buxton | Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $25,000

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser John Buxton discusses a valuable Zuni olla, or pot, that the guest’s mother found on the side of the road while in Tucson, Arizona. About two years after this episode's original airing, a viewer wrote in to suggest that this type of olla was something that the Zuni people would have left as a marker for someone who had died or had been buried in that location. To find out more, we contacted Barton Wright, an expert on Zuni artifacts, who tells us that this particular olla would have had only utilitarian, not a ceremonial, purpose.

    1723 American Miniature Blanket Chest

    Appraised on July 29, 2006 by Ronald Bourgeault | Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Original Appraised Value: $3,000 - $5,000

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, Cassie, the owner of the miniature blanket chest, says the inscription on the front of the piece — "Joseph Baldwin, 1723" — refers to her ancestor, born on September 14, 1702, in Uxbridge, Massachusetts. After this episode aired, a viewer wrote in claiming lineage to the same Joseph Baldwin (his great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather), who he says was born on the same day but in Billerica, Massachusetts — not Uxbridge. It is difficult to say exactly whose inscription is on the box, as there were numerous Joseph Baldwins living in Massachusetts at that time. Information from the Massachusetts Vital Records Project does record a Joseph Baldwin born in Billerica, Massachusetts, on September 14, 1702. Birth records for Uxbridge, Massachusetts, do not seem to exist for dates prior to its incorporation as a town in 1727.

    Scrimshaw Hippo Tooth, ca. 1840

    Appraised on August 4, 2007 by J. Michael Flanigan | Spokane, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $6,000 - $8,000

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser J. Michael Flanigan says he is uncertain of the identity of the building carved on the side of this hippopotamus tooth. After the episode aired, two viewers wrote in to say that this carving was a depiction of the Old Customs House in Zanzibar — an East African island now part of Tanzania. One of the viewers even matched the building to an illustration in the book Armored Ships (1994), in which author Ian Marshall discusses the history of battleships and their historical relevance to Zanzibar’s harbor.

    Jón Stefánsson Oil Painting, ca. 1930

    Appraised on August 4, 2007 by Nan Chisholm | Spokane, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $60,000

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Nan Chisholm mentions that the landscape depicted in this Stefansson painting is of Thigveller, Iceland. After this episode aired, however, a viewer wrote in suggesting that the painting actually depicts Akra Mountain in Akrafjall — observed from the city of Reykjavik across the bay. In hopes of confirming the location Chisholm contacted an Icelandic collector familiar with Stefansson's work, who verified that the painting is not of Thigveller. While the actual landscape has yet to be positively identified (the collector could only suggest that the painting may be of Akra Mountain), Chisholm tells us that she later ran into a similar painting done by Stefansson, which she says matched the piece in this appraisal. Confoundingly, the owner of this second painting said the landscape is of the Brei avík area in west Iceland.

    Three 20th-Century Vintage Posters

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Nicholas Lowry | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $11,000 - $16,500

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Nicholas Lowry explains that the most valuable of these three 20th-century vintage posters, a Japanese Art Deco image, was produced between 1925-1930 for an event he called the "Kanazawa exhibition." After this show's broadcast, a viewer wrote in to clarify that the poster was actually made in 1932 for "Sangyô to Kankô no Dai-Hakurankai," or The Great Exhibition of Industries and Tourism. We have since confirmed that the viewer was exactly right: The Great Exhibition of Industries and Tourism was open in Kanazawa City, Japan, from April 4 to June 5, 1932.

    United States Secret Service Archive, ca. 1900

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Ken Gloss | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000 - $10,000

    Update May 18, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Ken Gloss discusses a Secret Service archive, ca. 1905, which he found boxed-up in the bedroom of a newly purchased Palm Springs home. After the episode aired, a viewer wrote in to offer his opinion that while this collection of items was valued together at about $5,000 to $10,000, the Secret Service badge could have a potential worth of about that much on its own. To follow up, we contacted Phil Weiss, an appraiser who specializes in collectibles. Weiss tells us that because law-enforcement badges have their own specialized collectors' market, he agrees this particular badge has significant stand-alone value, which he estimates could be in the range of $3,000 to $10,000.

    Ruth, Mantle & Maris Signed Baseball

    Appraised on June 28, 2008 by Leila Dunbar | Dallas, Texas
    Original Appraised Value: $30,000 - $50,000

    Update March 2, 2009:
    In this segment, appraiser Leila Dunbar discusses a baseball signed by Babe Ruth, Roger Maris, and Mickey Mantle. When noting the date for Ruth’s signature, Leila refers to the inscribed “1931” as the “heyday of his career.” After the segment aired, a viewer wrote in to inform us that the Ruth signature could not have been done in 1931 because Major League baseballs before 1934 had alternate red and blue stitching and the baseball in this appraisal had all red stitching. After Dunbar contacted the Baseball Hall of Fame, we confirmed that indeed the red stitching does date this ball to post-1934. Despite the later date of the Babe Ruth signature, Dunbar's $30,000 to $50,000 appraised value remains unchanged because this is still the only known baseball signed by all three of these baseball legends.

    Karabagh Rug, ca. 1880

    Appraised on June 7, 2008 by Peter Pap | Palm Springs, California
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000

    Update February 2, 2009:
    In this segment appraiser Peter Pap discusses a ca. 1880 Karabagh rug, mentioning that Karabagh is part of Azerbaijan, a country in the South Caucasus. After the appraisal aired, a viewer wrote to point out that Karabagh is historically and culturally distinct from Azerbaijan. As of today Karabagh (or Nagorno-Karabakh) remains a disputed region whose borders lie within Azerbaijan and whose population is almost entirely Armenian. Karabagh rugs derive their name primarily from the geographical location in which they are woven; this example might be considered an Armenian rug, but other ethnic groups could also have been represented among the weavers, as these rugs were typically made in small workshops in various villages. In these villages would be Kurds and Azeri Turks, certainly Muslim and Christian Armenians as well. Ultimately, it is difficult to determine the ethnic origin of a particular rug because all such weavings are given the designation "Karabagh" in the trade.

    Chinese Silk Robe, ca. 1662

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Marley Rabstenek | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $15,000 - $20,000

    Update November 3, 2008:
    In this segment, appraiser Marley Rabstenek mentions that this beautiful Chinese silk robe would likely have been worn by someone wealthy. What she didn't say at the time was that its wearer would actually have been someone even more eminent: a person who lived or worked within China's Imperial Palace. Of the 17th-century robe Rabstenek adds, "It is a rare piece of exceptional quality; a type worn during the Emperor Kangxi's reign."

    Caucasian Perepedil Rug, ca. 1892

    Appraised on June 18, 2005 by Peter Pap | Providence, Rhode Island
    Original Appraised Value: $5,000

    Update November 3, 2008:
    In this segment, appraiser Peter Pap translates the date woven into this Caucasian Perepedil rug as reading "1308" in the Islamic lunar calendar. However, as an alert viewer e-mailed us to point out, the date actually reads "1307." Noting that the Islamic characters for 7 and 8 are very similar, Pap says that the mistake does not significantly affect his approximate translation to a corresponding year of 1892 in the Christian calendar.

    Jewelry Collection, ca. 1875

    Appraised on July 30, 2005 by Virginia Salem | Bismarck, North dakota
    Original Appraised Value: $1,500 - $3,000

    Update November 3, 2008:
    In this segment appraiser Virginia Salem discusses a collection of cameos, one of which depicts a scene of a mother and children. After the appraisal aired viewers wrote in to point out that that particular scene is actually from a well-known 1514 painting by the Italian Renaissance master Raphael. It is called Madonna della Seggiola or Madonna della Sedia ("Madonna of the Chair") and depicts Mary holding the baby Jesus as a young John the Baptist stands close by. The original work is held in the Pitti Palace in Florence.

    American Historical Staffordshire Platter by Joseph Heath & Company, ca. 1835

    Appraised on August 4, 2007 by David Lackey | Spokane, Washington
    Original Appraised Value: $1,000 - $1,500

    Update October 27, 2008:
    In this segment, appraiser David Lackey characterizes the man depicted on the Staffordshire platter as a "farmer," because at the time of the recording he was unsure of his identity. Thanks to a viewer in Camden, New Jersey, we now know more about his identity. According to the Web site "Art & Architecture of New Jersey," the man with the walking stick is Quaker preacher and anti-slavery activist Richard Jordan (1756-1826), on his farm near present-day Camden, as sketched toward the end of his life by his friend William Mason.



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