Cornelius Van Leemputten Painting

Value (2005) | $1,500 Auction$2,500 Auction

GUEST:
I went to an estate sale in our neighborhood and I went to the preview and I saw this in the corner and I really liked it. So the next day, I was there early and went straight for it and managed to buy it. And I've only had it for about eight months now.

APPRAISER:
And do you know who it's by?

GUEST:
I haven't been able to find any information about the artist on the Internet, so I don't really know much about the painting.

APPRAISER:
Well, what name were you putting into the search engines on the Internet?

GUEST:
I wasn't sure whether the second letter was an "o" or a "c," so I tried both spellings and I didn't get any information.

APPRAISER:
You didn't try an "e"?

GUEST:
No, I didn't try an "e."

APPRAISER:
That's what it is.

GUEST:
Oh, it's an "e"!

APPRAISER:
It's Cornelius Van Leemputten, who was a Belgian artist of the 19th century.

GUEST:
Okay.

APPRAISER:
And I don't know if you noticed, it's quite grimy. And down here in the murk is a signature.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
"C. Van Leemputten." Now, he was pretty much a self-taught artist apart from a brief spell in Antwerp, where he studied at the art school and was very influenced by the French artist Charles Frère. In the 19th century, there were a lot of great animal painters. Leemputten was like, say, a second-tier artist who was influenced by them, and they were all influenced by the great 17th-century Dutch master Paulus Potter. Now, one might suppose that the reason these paintings were so popular in the 19th century was it was during the ferment of the Industrial Revolution, and I think these artists were hankering for a more simple, agrarian past. And so these were in great demand at that time and still are. Now, you might think this is a full frame, or did you...?

GUEST:
No, I thought that part of the frame had been taken off, because it's unfinished along the edges.

APPRAISER:
That's right. This is what we call a slip frame, and there are actually little pinholes right in the side, so this had a pretty ornate gilt set frame at some point. Now, when you bought it, how much did you pay for it at the time?

GUEST:
$300.

APPRAISER:
Well, I think you've done pretty well, really. I have to say that there is a bit of a commercial drawback. There is not great demand for goat's udders displayed quite as overtly as they are here.

GUEST:
No...

APPRAISER:
But in spite of that, I think there would be a lot of interest if it came up at auction. Is this something you're thinking of holding on to?

GUEST:
I want to hold on to it and I want to have it restored.

APPRAISER:
Well, first of all, if you were to put it back in auction just now, no question, it would make $1,500 to two-and-a-half thousand dollars quite easily. If you were to have it cleaned, it depends where you go, obviously. It shouldn't cost more than, you know, a couple of hundred dollars or so. If you had it cleaned up and then put in a proper frame, it could auction... I would think it would increase the value by maybe, you know, another 50%. Maybe it could be up to about $3,000 or so.

GUEST:
Thank you.

APPRAISER:
You done good.

GUEST:
Thank you.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Freeman's Auctioneers
Philadelphia, PA
Appraised value (2005)
$1,500 Auction$2,500 Auction
Event
Bismarck, ND (July 30, 2005)
Period
19th Century
Form
Painting

Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.

Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?" is so often "It depends."

Note the date: Take note of the date the appraisal was recorded. This information appears in the upper left corner of the page, with the label "Appraised On." Values change over time according to market forces, so the current value of the item could be higher, lower, or the same as when our expert first appraised it.

Context is key: Listen carefully. Most of our experts will give appraisal values in context. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Retail prices are different from wholesale prices. Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market. A shop owner will usually talk about what he knows best: the retail price he'd place on the object in his shop. And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. As a rule, however, retail and insurance/replacement values are about the same.

Verbal approximations: The values given by the experts on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW are considered "verbal approximations of value." Technically, an "appraisal" is a legal document, generally for insurance purposes, written by a qualified expert and paid for by the owner of the item. An appraisal usually involves an extensive amount of research to establish authenticity, provenance, composition, method of construction, and other important attributes of a particular object.

Opinion of value: As with all appraisals, the verbal approximations of value given at ROADSHOW events are our experts' opinions formed from their knowledge of antiques and collectibles, market trends, and other factors. Although our valuations are based on research and experience, opinions can, and sometimes do, vary among experts.

Appraiser affiliations: Finally, the affiliation of the appraiser may have changed since the appraisal was recorded. To see current contact information for an appraiser in the ROADSHOW Archive, click on the link below the appraiser's picture. Our Appraiser Index also contains a complete list of active ROADSHOW appraisers and their contact details and biographies.