19th-Century Union Metallic Cartridge Ammunition Calendars

Value (2005) | $16,000 Auction$20,000 Auction

GUEST:
Around 25 years ago, I went to a garage sale, and up on the wall there were these three calendars in an old oak frame. And I asked the gentleman, I said, "Are they for sale?" He said, "No, but $50 will take them," so I bought them for $50. Brought them home, and my daughter, a year or so ago, said she'd like to have them.

APPRAISER:
Mm-hmm.

GUEST:
So I went and I had them framed and I went to pick them up, and the framer said, "Somebody came in and said these are worth money. You should have them appraised." And that's why I'm here.

APPRAISER:
So where's the third one?

GUEST:
Uh, the third one is in my daughter's office in Kentucky.

APPRAISER:
Oh, okay.

GUEST:
I asked the gentleman, "Is there any history to them?"

APPRAISER:
Mm-hmm.

GUEST:
He said, "Yeah, I just retired from Remington, and these were given to me as a present." And they used to be in their clubhouse at Lordship, where they shot skeet.

APPRAISER:
Now, of course Union Metallic was the earlier name of Remington.

GUEST:
Yeah, they became Remington...

APPRAISER:
Became Remington later in the 20th century. It's a pair of lithograph calendars.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
They're called ammunition or cartridge calendars. It's a whole category of advertising collectibles.

GUEST:
Yeah.

APPRAISER:
Now, in the world of advertising collectibles, there's a whole hierarchy. It's like leading up from a country priest to the pope.

GUEST:
Yeah.

APPRAISER (chuckling): These come from the Vatican.

GUEST (chuckling): No, really?

APPRAISER:
The top advertising collectibles are cartridge calendars.

GUEST:
Wow.

APPRAISER:
Now, the other interesting thing is that these have complete date pads. They both have January dates. And usually, when you find these, you have a December date. All the months have been removed.

GUEST:
Yeah. Yeah.

APPRAISER:
It's not that it makes a great difference to the value, but it sort of makes it interesting that they weren't sent to a hunting goods store like most of them were.

GUEST:
Yeah, yeah, right, yeah.

APPRAISER:
And then the owner would rip them off month by month. The condition is excellent; there's the slightest touch of damage, very minor, and it doesn't affect the graphics.

GUEST:
Yeah.

APPRAISER:
So I have a feeling that if you could find that guy at the frame store, you should pay him a commission. (both laughing)

GUEST:
Matter of fact, he gave me a bargain for framing them.

APPRAISER:
Oh, right. Most of the 20th-century cartridge ammo calendars sell in the low thousands.

GUEST:
Yeah.

APPRAISER:
These two are exceptional examples, very early, with fantastic graphics and excellent themes. And I estimate them at $8,000 to $10,000 each.

GUEST:
Wow, I can't believe that!

APPRAISER:
You're looking at $16,000 to $20,000.

GUEST:
Yeah, I can't.

APPRAISER:
And at a good advertising auction, you might really see them go berserk. I've seen it happen. This is a conservative estimate.

GUEST:
I can't believe they're worth so much money.

APPRAISER:
Oh, yeah.

GUEST:
Can't believe it.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Heritage Auctions
Los Angeles, CA
Appraised value (2005)
$16,000 Auction$20,000 Auction
Event
Providence, RI (June 18, 2005)
Period
19th Century

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