1965 Green Bay Packers Football

Value (2006) | $5,000 Auction$6,000 Auction

GUEST:
Back in 1966, I was involved with a handicapped group that was going to the all-star game, and that was held at Soldier Field, Chicago.

APPRAISER:
Mm-hmm.

GUEST:
And they gave us seats, or at least a position to put our wheelchairs back behind the north goalpost. Well, during the game, I was able to catch one of the extra-point footballs, and I was in cloud nine. I had two young boys at home, and this was going to be a great souvenir. Well, when the game was over and we were about to leave, I gave my ball to this... other volunteer, a young lady, and I had it in a paper sack, and I said, "Take care of this for me while I get the patients back on the bus." Well, she didn't really do that. She put it on the bus and then did something else, and somebody stole the ball. Well, I was heartbroken, of course. So I wrote a long letter to Coach Lombardi, told him what I'm telling you, and by return mail, I got this football.

APPRAISER:
This is 1965 championship team. The first of three championship teams.

GUEST:
Yes, that's right. They had a series of three.

APPRAISER:
This is a "Duke" football.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
"The Duke" was the official NFL football of the time.

GUEST:
That's right.

APPRAISER:
Do you know where the name "The Duke" comes from?

GUEST:
No, I don't.

APPRAISER:
Wellington Mara, the owner of the New York Giants,

GUEST:
Yeah?

APPRAISER:
his nickname was "The Duke." And when the deal was originally made with Wilson to make the footballs,

GUEST:
Right.

APPRAIASER: they dubbed this football "The Duke" after him.

GUEST:
That's interesting.

APPRAISER:
Yes.

GUEST:
That's where the name comes from.

APPRAISER:
Right. The NFL's actually using "The Duke" footballs today, again.

GUEST:
It's still "The Duke"? Or was there a period...

APPRAISER:
There was a period where they didn't, and now they do again. But "The Duke" footballs are very, very collectible, because they're from the Golden Age of football.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
This football represents more than just the Golden Age of football, it also represents the golden team: the Green Bay Packers of that era.

GUEST:
Yes, that's right, they had a dynasty then.

APPRAISER:
No more important person than Vince Lombardi, the coach, the legendary coach...

GUEST:
Right. That's right.

APPRAISER:
and his beautiful signature on this football right here. It's an amazing football. Let me show you some other signatures. Here we have Bart Starr, quarterback.

GUEST:
Oh, yes. Right.

APPRAISER:
Played for Alabama.

GUEST:
He certainly did.

APPRAISER:
We have Henry Jordan, who's an extremely collectible signature. He's right over here.

GUEST:
Okay.

APPRAISER:
He died quite early, and his autographs are very valuable. Now... the Green Bay Packers signed a lot of footballs. They also had footballs made with facsimile signatures on them. I don't think these are facsimiles. These are not facsimiles. These are authentic. The condition is very, very good, considering its age.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
The signatures are great. Now, a lot of times the ink in the pen reacted in a strange way with the leather. The signatures would basically disappear. But these haven't.

GUEST:
No.

APPRAISER:
They're bold and they're dark, and that's the way collectors want them.

GUEST:
Well, I protected the ball. I kept it covered. It really hasn't been exposed to light much at all.

APPRAISER:
Have you ever had it appraised?

GUEST:
No. No, this is the first time. You know, I've shown it to friends.

APPRAISER:
Mm-hmm.

GUEST:
But... I've been waiting for a chance to take it to the ANTIQUES ROADSHOW just for what we're doing right now.

APPRAISER:
If I were to put it in an auction, I would estimate it at $5,000 to $6,000.

GUEST:
Mm-hmm.

APPRAISER:
But I wouldn't be surprised if this football went for a lot more than that because of the condition. What a great story-- the fact that you got it from Vince Lombardi, that's an important piece of the legacy of this football.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Paddle8
New York, NY
Appraised value (2006)
$5,000 Auction$6,000 Auction
Event
Mobile, AL (July 08, 2006)
Period
20th Century
Form
Football
Material
Leather

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