Old Mine Cushion Cut Diamond Ring & Four Paul Flato Watches

Value (2009) | $215,000 Auction$270,000 Auction

GUEST:
They belonged to my husband's great-aunt, who was born before the turn of the century. She was very avant-garde and loved... things and loved me because she gave them to me.

APPRAISER:
It's nice to see that things get passed on to people who enjoy them.

GUEST:
Absolutely.

APPRAISER:
What is the name on the watches?

GUEST:
The name is Flato. All I know is-- from watching Roadshow-- is that he was a jeweler who made things for movie stars.

APPRAISER:
He was a jeweler to the stars, if you will, but also to socialites and people, of course, who had money. Flato's creations would also be seen in movies. For instance, Greta Garbo in Two-Faced Woman and Rita Hayworth in Blood and Sand. But what's interesting is you don't see too many watches with his name on it. He died at 98 years old in 1999.

GUEST:
Oh, my goodness.

APPRAISER:
He lived a long life. He had a retail store in New York City on 57th Street in the '20s, but his business really flourished in the '30s and '40s. He was based out of California, hence the Hollywood connection, and he had just a fabulous eye for designing. And here you have a little purse that almost looks like a Hermès Birkin or Kelly, something along those lines. And it's so cute, and then you open it up and the surprise inside is you have a watch.

GUEST:
Right.

APPRSIER: A beautiful 1940s flexible rib bracelet, some nice calibrated sapphires. This one is also very interesting. You have steel with leather wrapped around it. Again, something you didn't see a lot back then. This is more what you would see today.

GUEST:
Right.

APPRAISER:
And then we get to the one that I love. Very powerful 1940s retro watch. And we can see these beautifully calibrated sapphires set in the end.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
This watch alone is worth, at auction, $10,000 to $12,000.

GUEST:
Oh, my word.

APPRAISER:
And considerably more because it's his.

GUEST:
Yes, yes.

APPRAISER:
But when I put the whole collection together, you have four of them. At auction, $15,000 to $20,000.

GUEST:
Oh my. That might almost send somebody-- one of the grandchildren-- to college.

APPRAISER:
I can't help noticing your ring.

GUEST:
Oh.

APPRAISER:
I asked you about it before.

GUEST:
Yes, you did. It came from the same woman.

APPRAISER:
Okay. You told me you had an appraisal on it...

GUEST:
For $35,000. That was when she gave it to me in '76.

APPRAISER:
Okay, I took a quick peek at it. I determined the color is probably E/F, VS quality. It's an old mine cushion cut.

GUEST:
Right.

APPRAISER:
I got to tell you, in today's market, this ring would probably sell at auction for $200,000 to $250,000.

GUEST:
Oh. I better take it off and hide it. (both laughing)

APPRAISER:
So it... the watches are fabulous for me, but I just had to let you know about the diamond.

GUEST:
Well, I'm glad you did. It made my day... my year.

APPRAISER:
Thanks for coming.

GUEST:
Well, thank you very much, Kevin, I appreciate it.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Doyle New York
New York, NY
Appraised value (2009)
$215,000 Auction$270,000 Auction
Event
Denver, CO (July 25, 2009)
Period
20th Century
Form
Ring, Watch

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