1910 Fat Men’s Amusement Company Memorabilia

Value (2010) | $2,000 Insurance
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APPRAISER:
When I think of amusement, I think of those rides where you have to be this tall to get on. But looking at this shirt, it looks like you had to be this wide to play for this team. Where did this come from?

GUEST:
This was my grandfather's shirt that he wore when he was 16 years old, when he played for the Fat Men's Amusement Company out of northeastern Iowa. My grandfather was always a very large man. He weighed over 350 pounds most of his life.

APPRAISER:
Mm-hmm.

GUEST:
But this is just amazing-- great family history.

APPRAISER:
This is your grandfather right here.

GUEST:
Correct.

APPRAISER:
He was the lightweight of the team?

GUEST:
Uh, yes.

APPRAISER:
And this gentleman right here, Baby Bliss?

GUEST:
He weighed, according to the information we have, 640 pounds. He was the largest on the team.

APPRAISER:
Wow.

GUEST:
My grandfather used to tell the story that it took three chairs for Baby Bliss to sit on when he ate in a restaurant.

APPRAISER:
I can imagine. And you would not want to get behind them in the buffet line.

GUEST:
(laughing) No.

APPRAISER:
So I see in this other photo as well, we have Oliver Kimball? He was the umpire?

GUEST:
Right, and he was only 48 inches tall.

APPRAISER:
48 inches tall.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
So how could he even see behind these guys?

GUEST:
I don't think he could.

APPRAISER:
And where did they go? Where did they travel to?

GUEST:
They were a regional team around Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois.

APPRAISER:
Mm-hmm.

GUEST:
And they went and they played teams that were from the towns they were in.

APPRAISER:
And I'm guessing that they hit a lot of home runs.

GUEST:
I would hope so.

APPRAISER:
Now, you found these postcards. And he sent these from different places where he traveled?

GUEST:
Yes, he did, sometimes saying what position he was going to play tomorrow or when he'd be home, those types of things.

APPRAISER:
Well, I have to tell you, normally, this is the part where I spew a lot of statistics and sound like ESPN Classic, and tell you a lot of things. (laughing) We really don't know much about this team beyond what you've told us. This is what I can tell you. Based on the fact that we have this very large and very wool outfit... Yeah. And you can prove that it's from 1910 and we have the provenance behind all this-- the great poster, the jersey, the postcards, the photo-- it does have a value to it that I think goes beyond sentimental or historical. I would place about a $2,000 value on it for insurance.

GUEST:
Great.

APPRAISER:
Now, of course it means a lot more to you for the history of what your grandfather and what he meant. And I hope you're not disappointed, Pat. I know we've had a lot higher appraisals on this show, but I have to tell you, this by far I think is the biggest appraisal…

GUEST:
(laughing) Thank you.

APPRAISER:
…we've ever had on the show.

GUEST:
Thank you.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Leila Dunbar Appraisals & Consulting, LLC
Washington, DC
Appraised value (2010)
$2,000 Insurance
Event
Des Moines, IA (August 07, 2010)
Period
20th Century
Material
Cloth, Paper, Wool

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