Signed Ty Cobb Archive, ca. 1952

Value (2011) | $34,000 Auction$41,000 Auction
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GUEST:
My mother worked for the Coca-Cola Company in Twin Falls, Idaho, in the late '40s and early '50s, and Mr. Cobb owned the Coca-Cola plant there in Twin. She was a secretary, and they became friends, a lot of correspondence back and forth, a lot of it had to do with the business. She would tell him how things were going, one thing or another. He would come into Twin Falls area in the fall and hunt. Pheasant hunting he enjoyed a lot. My mother and dad were just getting started after World War II and he just befriended them. And one time he went to Lake Tahoe for a few days with them and visited he and his wife. That's my father. That's when Mother and Dad visited him in Reno.

APPRAISER:
What a great way... to have a friendship with somebody like Ty Cobb, who not only was known for being a great baseball player, but he was great at the stock market also. Of course, Coca-Cola was how he started making his millions.

GUEST:
He convinced my mother and dad to buy about $3,000 in Coca-Cola stock about that time, and I think that helped the relationship between them. Later on they were building a house, Dad was getting started in a new business, and he wanted to sell his stock back to Mr. Cobb. That upset Cobb quite a bit, and I think that's kind of when the relationship went the other way, but...

APPRAISER:
Oh, that's a shame.

GUEST:
Well, Ty Cobb, either he really liked you or he really didn't, apparently.

APPRAISER:
Apparently, yeah. Well, let's look at some of the pieces you have here. You have the Science of Batting by Ty Cobb, and if we look at the inside of the cover here, we see that it's signed by Ty Cobb. And the same with this other program, Famous Sluggers, which, of course, Ty Cobb is. You open up to one of the pages there and it's signed to you from what I can see here, right?

GUEST:
Right.

APPRAISER:
Right to you in 1952. I think that these are splendid pieces for the collector. I think that both these programs would sell somewhere about $2,000 each.

GUEST:
Wow.

APPRAISER:
In auction. Let's talk a little bit about the baseball. Once again I see that that's signed to you. It's an unofficial ball, but it's still very nice. I think in auction, that would bring $5,000 to $7,000. Okay?

GUEST:
Okay.

APPRAISER:
The letters. We have 16 hand-written letters here by Ty Cobb to your family.

GUEST:
Right.

APPRAISER:
There's some really good content. There is different value in these letters. Some of these are signed just first name, "Ty." Some of them are signed "Ty Cobb." The collectors really want the full signature. That's what holds the best value. This is really material that should all stay together. And if you broke it up, it wouldn't be the same.

GUEST:
I understand.

APPRAISER:
I would say that at auction, all these letters would bring about $25,000 to $30,000.

GUEST:
Wow.

APPRAISER:
Are you surprised by the value that you have here?

GUEST:
I actually thought it was a little higher.

APPRAISER:
For something of Ty Cobb, which is... actually, he's pretty common on letters.

GUEST:
Oh, it is?

APPRAISER:
Yeah. For him to have a lot of value on a letter, it would have to be some baseball content, something really pertinent to baseball or perhaps to his family, something like that.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Heritage Auctions
Dallas, TX
Appraised value (2011)
$34,000 Auction$41,000 Auction
Event
Eugene, OR (June 04, 2011)
Form
Baseball

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