1956 Elvis “Love Me Tender” Standee

Value (2014) | $18,000 Auction$20,000 Auction
Watch  

GUEST:
From what I understand, it's called a standee. I am an avid Elvis lover.

APPRAISER:
You have your t-shirt on, I can see that.

GUEST:
Yes, and believe it or not, just some awesome friends of mine were cleaning a home that they bought out to renovate, and lo and behold, in the attic was Elvis. And the minute they found it, Jack said to his wife, "Well, Joan, we know right where this is going."

APPRAISER:
I'm sure you're very familiar with Elvis's career.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
And this one's particularly important because it's his first feature-length film. And at the time, the film was supposed to be called The Reno Brothers, which were the title characters. But his hit single "Love Me Tender" had already sold a million copies, so the song was so popular at this point, they actually retitled the film. But because it was his first appearance, he actually got third billing in the film, which he... that never happened again, obviously, because he was such a huge star. They were made to decorate the lobbies of the movie theaters when the films came to town. And they would be passed on, oftentimes to the next theater. Well, as you can see, you do have a crease. That's pretty common. Most of these were just in pieces by the time a film's run would be finished. The crease across the center, that's how it was made. They're made to fold so they can be shipped. There were reports that you couldn't hear the film because the girls in the theater were screaming so loudly because he was such a heartthrob. So I would imagine that many of these were also probably torn to shreds by fans coming out of the theater who wanted a piece of Elvis to take home. You keep this by your bed.

GUEST:
Oh, yes.

APPRAISER:
And you wake up every morning and see Elvis.

GUEST:
Oh, yes.

APPRAISER:
There are only about two or three of these known to exist.

GUEST:
Really?

APPRAISER:
So many were destroyed. So at auction, I would estimate it at least $10,000 to $15,000.

GUEST:
Oh, my God!

APPRAISER:
So are you going to keep it by your bed still?

GUEST:
Absolutely. You're kidding!

APPRAISER:
No. I've never seen one before. I've only ever seen pictures, so...

GUEST:
You made my day.

APPRAISER:
I'm glad.

GUEST:
And of all people, with Elvis. Thank you very... Thank you, thank you very much.

APPRAISER:
Thank you.

GUEST:
Thank you very much.

APPRAISER:
You're welcome.

GUEST:
Oh, my God.

APPRAISER:
Really, the only people who have them are probably the very highest end of Elvis collectors, so you're in that group.

GUEST:
Really?

APPRAISER:
Yeah.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
The Collector's Lab
Los Angeles, California
Value Update (2014)
$18,000 Auction$20,000 Auction
Appraised value (2011)
$10,000 Auction$15,000 Auction
Event
Minneapolis, MN (July 09, 2011)
Period
20th Century
Form
Figure
Material
Cardboard

Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.

Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?" is so often "It depends."

Note the date: Take note of the date the appraisal was recorded. This information appears in the upper left corner of the page, with the label "Appraised On." Values change over time according to market forces, so the current value of the item could be higher, lower, or the same as when our expert first appraised it.

Context is key: Listen carefully. Most of our experts will give appraisal values in context. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Retail prices are different from wholesale prices. Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market. A shop owner will usually talk about what he knows best: the retail price he'd place on the object in his shop. And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. As a rule, however, retail and insurance/replacement values are about the same.

Verbal approximations: The values given by the experts on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW are considered "verbal approximations of value." Technically, an "appraisal" is a legal document, generally for insurance purposes, written by a qualified expert and paid for by the owner of the item. An appraisal usually involves an extensive amount of research to establish authenticity, provenance, composition, method of construction, and other important attributes of a particular object.

Opinion of value: As with all appraisals, the verbal approximations of value given at ROADSHOW events are our experts' opinions formed from their knowledge of antiques and collectibles, market trends, and other factors. Although our valuations are based on research and experience, opinions can, and sometimes do, vary among experts.

Appraiser affiliations: Finally, the affiliation of the appraiser may have changed since the appraisal was recorded. To see current contact information for an appraiser in the ROADSHOW Archive, click on the link below the appraiser's picture. Our Appraiser Index also contains a complete list of active ROADSHOW appraisers and their contact details and biographies.