1961 Ronald Reagan Inscribed Print

Value (2014) | $1,000 Insurance$1,500 Insurance
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GUEST:
It's a montage of caricatures of Ronald Reagan which were done over a period of time. He autographed it to me. I worked with him for a long time on a program called General Electric Theater. It was on the air on CBS, and I was sort of the executive in charge of Ronald Reagan. I wrote and produced all of his lead-in material and commercial material. We became good friends. I saw him at least once a week for six years.

APPRAISER:
Obviously the greatest value in this piece is the fact that you've spent six years with Ronald Reagan, so it's a nice memory for you.

GUEST:
Yes, yes.

APPRAISER:
And every time you pass this in the hallway and you get to look at it, and kind of remember those times and him, as a friend. And it's really witty. It says here, "Dear Bill, the face in" "the lower right-hand corner must be the one I wore" "when the schedule called for re-shooting." So he's giving a nice grimace and a pucker.

GUEST:
Yeah.

APPRAISER:
"The one in the upper right is the one I wear" "when I think of you and how pleasant it has all been." "Thanks and regards, Ronnie." So, even in this casual early inscription in his career,

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
He's got a way with words. He obviously had a great wit about him, and he's one of those few Presidents that still actually tried to actively write a lot of their own speeches, clearly cause he was a good--

GUEST:
Oh yes. Well, he was president of the Screen Actors Guild. He was in-demand as a speaker, so he did a lot of speaking even way back then.

APPRAISER:
Did he try his speeches out on you?

GUEST:
Oh, yeah, absolutely. He would sit in the dressing room, and he'd knock 'em out.

APPRAISER:
Well, if we look at it in market value, early inscriptions from Ronald Reagan from this period are probably worth in the three to five hundred dollar range, but having it in the context of being from the General Electric Theater, having the connection to you, having the fun caricatures on a poster, I think brings it much more. If you were going to insure this, I would definitely insure it for anywhere between a thousand and fifteen hundred dollars.

GUEST:
The word is priceless.

APPRAISER:
Absolutely.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
The Collector's Lab
Los Angeles, CA
Appraised value (2014)
$1,000 Insurance$1,500 Insurance
Event
Richmond, VA (August 17, 2013)

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