1959 Minerva Teichert "Cowboy with Sheep "Oil"

Value (2014) | $10,000 Auction$15,000 Auction
Watch  

GUEST:
I'm not quite sure, but I'm almost positive it's a painting of my brother-in-law, who is a sheep rancher in Wyoming. It was painted, I believe, from the date, in 1959, and he died in 1964. They've had it in Cokeville, Wyoming, is where they lived. His wife died in '89, and it came to my wife. So it's been somewhat in the family since the time it was painted.

APPRAISER:
Okay, and do you know who the artist is?

GUEST:
Minerva Teichert, who, from what I've been reading about her, was quite a well known artist and did a lot of religious and rural scenes. She was a Mormon lady in the Salt Lake area.

APPRAISER:
And it's interesting that you mention Cokeville, Wyoming, because that's where Minerva lived at the latter part of her life. They even hold contests and exhibitions in her name in Cokeville. In Cokeville, she was actually a well-known personality.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
She was born in 1888 in the Utah Territory. She was raised in Idaho with a strict Mormon upbringing.

GUEST:
Yes.

APPRAISER:
She is one of the more famous Mormon artists actually today. She was sent to school, first in Chicago at the Art Institute of Chicago, where she studied under Vanderpoel, and then later, she herself went to New York, and she studied there at the Art Students League under Robert Henri, who basically was one of her biggest mentors, and they had a very good relationship. He really pushed her to do what she did and return and paint the Mormon subjects that she loved. She was famous for doing a lot of large-scale works as well, a lot of murals.

GUEST:
Oh, yeah.

APPRAISER:
And some of her murals are in famous Mormon temples and also at the Brigham Young University.

GUEST:
Oh yeah.

APPRAISER:
So she was the first female artist that was really given official recognition and allowed by the Church of LDS to actually study painting. This is an oil-on-canvas painting.

GUEST:
Yes, it's the original frame also, I believe.

APPRAISER:
Which we can also add to its value. And it has her typical palette, which is a kind of a subdued, but very light colors. She's one of those artists who are very famous, but they don't have that many works appear at auction, so to put a fair market value on it is a little harder. But I can tell you that one work at auction, which was a similar subject, sold for $10,000 on an estimate of $800 to $1,200. So basically, that shows you that the interest was really significant, much more than the estimate. I would estimate this work at auction with a very conservative estimate of $10,000 to $15,000.

GUEST:
Oh, that's interesting.

APPRAISER:
And I think that's conservative because with enough interest, which I'm sure there would be, given the fact that she's such an important Mormon artist, I think it could do a lot better. It could even go up to $20,000 or $30,000.

GUEST:
I'm sure it'll stay in the family.

APPRAISER:
For insurance, I would say at least $20,000 as a retail replacement value.

GUEST:
Mm-hmm.

Appraisal Details

Appraiser
Shapiro Auctions
New York, NY
Appraised value (2014)
$10,000 Auction$15,000 Auction
Event
Bismarck, ND (May 31, 2014)
Material
Oil

Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.

Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?" is so often "It depends."

Note the date: Take note of the date the appraisal was recorded. This information appears in the upper left corner of the page, with the label "Appraised On." Values change over time according to market forces, so the current value of the item could be higher, lower, or the same as when our expert first appraised it.

Context is key: Listen carefully. Most of our experts will give appraisal values in context. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Retail prices are different from wholesale prices. Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market. A shop owner will usually talk about what he knows best: the retail price he'd place on the object in his shop. And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. As a rule, however, retail and insurance/replacement values are about the same.

Verbal approximations: The values given by the experts on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW are considered "verbal approximations of value." Technically, an "appraisal" is a legal document, generally for insurance purposes, written by a qualified expert and paid for by the owner of the item. An appraisal usually involves an extensive amount of research to establish authenticity, provenance, composition, method of construction, and other important attributes of a particular object.

Opinion of value: As with all appraisals, the verbal approximations of value given at ROADSHOW events are our experts' opinions formed from their knowledge of antiques and collectibles, market trends, and other factors. Although our valuations are based on research and experience, opinions can, and sometimes do, vary among experts.

Appraiser affiliations: Finally, the affiliation of the appraiser may have changed since the appraisal was recorded. To see current contact information for an appraiser in the ROADSHOW Archive, click on the link below the appraiser's picture. Our Appraiser Index also contains a complete list of active ROADSHOW appraisers and their contact details and biographies.