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Would You Eat a Century Old Egg?

Phil Tries: Century Old Eggs

Phil Tries: Century Old Eggs

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Would you eat a century old egg? The idea of eating anything that old—let alone an egg—may be off-putting. But the name of this Chinese delicacy (along with its many other nicknames, like millennium egg and thousand-year old egg) is a misnomer. It takes anywhere from a few weeks to a few months to prepare the eggs, far less than the name purports. 

To make century old eggs, duck, chicken or quail eggs are preserved in a mixture of clay, ash, salt, quicklime, and rice hulls. The chemicals present in the process turn the yolk a dark grey-green color and the egg white a translucent brown. When the aging process is complete, the eggs can be eaten on their own or used as an ingredient in a dish.

Legend has it that the first century old eggs were discovered by accident over 600 years ago. Phil gets his first (and possibly his last) taste of the delicacy at Megan’s Kitchen in Hong Kong. Whether you’re daring enough to give it a try or want to learn more about eggs, check out the egg-celent links below!





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