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Personality and Temperament


Just as one size does not fit all, every dog has his own unique personality and temperament. When you are bonding with your dog, become very familiar with and sensitive to his character.

Your dog's temperament was determined and/or developed as a result of inherited behavior, the characteristics of his breed, and environmental influences.


How to Begin...
There are basically five different types of temperament: High energy/outgoing; shy; strong-willed; calm/easygoing; and aggressive.

Before you begin to train your dog, be very familiar with his personality and temperament, and plan to customize your training accordingly. This will lead to the path of least resistance for your dog, and encourage better results.

High energy/outgoing dogs are more playful than nervous. They are spirited, active and playful; tend to be pacers and panters; and, are always on the move. They are easily distracted, and it is difficult to get them to obey you.

Shy dogs are usually comfortable in their own house, with their own family, but shy in new situations and around new people. You must be careful not to use excessive or overly firm corrections or too much authority when training a shy dog.

Strong-willed dogs have interesting personalities, and are usually warm-hearted intelligent animals. Training can be a battle of wills, however, but persistence will pay off.

Calm/easygoing dogs are slow-moving, and happiest when resting. They appear to have great composure and dignity. They train well because of their casual manner. However, obedience training may be somewhat of an imposition to them.

Aggressive dogs are bullies and biters and should never be around children. They demand total control over every situation. Professional obedience training at an early age may help to tailor aggressive behavior and is a necessity.

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