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Excessive Wetting


Excessive wetting should not be confused with housebreaking problems. More often than not, it occurs with emotional dogs who are perfectly housebroken.

For dogs and wolves living in a natural setting, urinating in small quantities is a sign of submission. Dog owners, having assumed the role of caretakers for their dogs, may be recognized for their dominance with excessive wetting.


Why Excessive Wetting Occurs
  • Too much water - Too much water may cause a dog or puppy to lose urinary control. Do not allow an excessive water unlimited water.

  • Fear of punishment - If a dog is physically or verbally abused, he may become permanently fearful of the abuser.

  • Excitability - Some dogs are simply overly excitable and cannot contain themselves.

  • Nervousness - Unlike an excitable dog reacting to pleasure, a nervous dog will wet excessively due to suspicion.

  • Illness - The possibility of a medical problem should not be overlooked. Consult your veterinarian.

  • The need to urinate - If a dog is not walked often enough, he may have no choice but to wet.

Proper Training Technique
Unlike other behavior problems, excessive bed wetting cannot be corrected by a corrective jerk, a shake can, or a water bottle. Proper correction involves a more personalized approach.

Several long walks a day and limited water intake are obvious solutions. However, body language, communication style, socialization, and praise are also important tools for curtailing excessive wetting problems.

By understanding that an excitable dog may wet when greeted, meet him outside and greet him quietly. This way he may not urinate and if he does, it will not be in the house. Do not dominate your dog with intimidating posture or verbal abuse. Make sure your dog has the opportunity to be around many people, and adjust the level of praise you offer your dog to his personality.

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