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Jumping on Furniture


The desire to jump on furniture is somewhat instinctive for dogs. In the wild, wolves will seek an elevated location with one solid wall behind them for protection. Dogs are also attracted to their owner's scent.

You must decide at an early stage if you will allow your dog to share the furniture with (or without) you. If you allow him on even one chair, you are inviting him to enjoy all the furniture.


Why Dogs Jump on Furniture
  • Prior Use - If a puppy is placed on the furniture, he considers it his territory. He can be chased away a hundred times, but he will continue to return when his owner is not around to stop him.

  • Sleeping in bed - It is difficult to teach a dog the difference between a bed and a sofa, chair, etc. So if a dog is allowed to sleep with his owner, he will also jump up on other furniture.

  • Warmth - When the floor gets a little cold, a dog will seek warmth on the furniture.

  • Noises - If a dog hears noises, he will attempt to climb higher to satisfy his curiosity.

Proper Training Technique
Place a leash and slip collar on your dog's neck and leave the room. Observe his activities without being noticed. As soon as you catch him jumping up on the furniture, grab the leash and jerk it, saying no. Use a gentle tone with a shy dog and a firmer tone with a stubborn dog. Praise the dog as soon as he responds positively to the command. A shake can may also be used.

When you plan to leave the house, create an aversion to his favorite piece of furniture. Blow up several balloons and pop a few close to your dog, then tape down several other inflated balloons on the surface of the furniture he is likely to jump on. The noise and sight association will create a deterrent. Another method of creating an aversion is to spread aluminum foil across the furniture. The sound and feel of it under your dog's paws is unpleasant.

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