Type

Salinger

Book Introduction to Salinger

Introduction from Salinger. Simon & Schuster. 2013. 720 pages. By David Shields and Shane Salerno J. D. Salinger spent ten years writing The Catcher in the Rye and the rest of his life regretting it. Before the book was published, he was a World War II veteran with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder; after the war, he […]

Salinger

Infographic: The Path to The Catcher in the Rye

In 1951 J.D. Salinger published The Catcher in the Rye, a debut novel that became one of the best known works in American literature. The book’s beloved anti-hero, Holden Caulfield, had been making appearances in Salinger’s writing since 1941. Follow the milestones in Salinger’s career that led to his most famous book. Click the image […]

Philip Roth: Unmasked

Photo Essay: In Newark They Read Philip Roth

Take a ride on the Philip Roth Tour Bus and see the sights of Roth’s Newark, New Jersey — his hometown and setting of several of his books, like Goodbye Columbus, Portnoy’s Complaint and I Married a Communist.

Billie Jean King

Biography

The life and times of Billie Jean King by filmmaker James Erskine/New Black Films.

Mel Brooks: Make A Noise

Spaceballs: The Art of the Trope (or, making the cliché absurd)

What came first: the Mel Brooks movie or the cliché?

The classic Hollywood Sci-Fi spaceship always gets gratuitous screentime from every camera angle. Mel Brooks’s Hollywood spaceship appears in a continuous one minute and 40 second scene detailing its ridiculous length.

Mel Brooks: Make A Noise

Young Frankenstein: The Art of the Homage

For Mel Brooks the spoofing is in the details.

The classic Hollywood Horror film is always black-and-white and includes scene transitions like iris outs, wipes and fades to black. Mel Brooks’s Hollywood Horror is no different. He even tracks down the original equipment from the mad doctor’s lab first used in the 1931 Frankenstein film.