Photo Galleries

Dorothea Lange: Grab A Hunk of Lightning

Dorothea Lange Biography with Photo Gallery

Life Summary Best known for her iconic photograph¬†Migrant Mother, photographer Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) had a career that spanned more than four decades. In 1919 at the age of 23 she daringly opened a portrait studio in San Francisco. Meeting her husband, the painter Maynard Dixon, who was 20 years her senior, exposed her to the […]

Tanaquil Le Clercq: Afternoon of a Faun

Biography and Photos of Tanaquil Le Clercq

Born in Paris, Tanaquil Le Clercq (1929 – 2000) was the daughter of a French intellectual and a society matron from St. Louis, MO. When Tanny was three, they moved to New York where her father Jacques Le Clercq taught romance languages. Tanny began ballet training in New York at age five, studying with Mikhail […]

Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself

George Plimpton Trading Cards

American Masters is proud to feature George Plimpton in its second series of vintage trading cards (see Billie Jean King for the first). Writer and journalist George Plimpton (1927-2003) lived many adventures, pushing the boundaries of his life, which could have likely hovered at a desk, fed only by imagination. Whether in sports, entertainment or […]


Infographic: The Path to The Catcher in the Rye

In 1951 J.D. Salinger published The Catcher in the Rye, a debut novel that became one of the best known works in American literature. The book’s beloved anti-hero, Holden Caulfield, had been making appearances in Salinger’s writing since 1941. Follow the milestones in Salinger’s career that led to his most famous book. Click the image […]

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Posters: How Carl Sandburg Saw Chicago

CHICAGO POEMS, published by Carl Sandburg in 1916, is an ode to a city. It’s a clear eyed and unapologetic love letter: where you tell your true-love you love them not in spite of their imperfections but because of them. This was Sandburg’s first volume of poetry, written in the years just after 1912 when he moved to Chicago.

In some ways, Sandburg’s writing was before its time–more like the social realism you associate with the later 1920s and 1930s–think Grant Wood’s American Gothic, think Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother. This was a time when industry, agriculture, and the worker were the heros of popular art.

Sandburg starts Chicago Poems with “Chicago.” Read it here and see its opening stanza visualized in poster art.