It could be your mother, a friend or a teacher. Have they expressed themselves artistically? Worked to better their community? Achieved academic success? Empowered others and embraced diversity? Share their stories here.
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Irene Smalls

Boston, MA, United States

“Girl, you gone too far to fall back.” With those words my godmother, Louise Godfrey McNeil propelled my soul and my generations. Part of the great Black migration from the rural south, she by force of will elevated me and my children from the tenements of Harlem, New York to the Ivy League onto the White House staff. Classy, kind, uneducated and brilliant Louise Godfrey McNeil was a true lady.