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Webisode 2: 1776-1809 Page: 1 | 2

The Declaration of Independence
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The Declaration of Independence
Here is a copy of the hand-inscribed Declaration of Independence, with its fifty-six original signatures. This famous parchment, however, was not the document signed by John Hancock on July 4, 1776 -- that was a printed version. The hand-drawn copy was first available for signing on August 2, 1776, and some members added their signatures even later.



July 4, 1776: Announcing the Declaration
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July 4, 1776: Announcing the Declaration
Here is a nineteenth century engraving depicting the historic day of July 4, 1776. Members of Congress, having just adopted the Declaration of Independence, emerge from the State House in Philadelphia to greet waiting crowds. John Hancock, President of Congress, stands in front with outstretched arm. Behind him are Benjamin Franklin, with hat in hand, Thomas Jefferson, leaning against left column, John Adams, conversing with Jefferson, Robert Livingstone, between them, and Roger Sherman, at the right column.


A Colonial Minuteman
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A Colonial Minuteman
In this picture, a minuteman prepares for war. Each citizen soldier was provided with a musket, a cartridge box, and thirty-six rounds of ammunition, and was expected to be ready to fight within sixty seconds of being called.


A Daughter of Liberty
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A "Daughter of Liberty"
Women served in many capacities during the Revolutionary War, and some even took up arms and helped to fight. One of these "daughters of liberty" was Hannah Snell, depicted on this woodcut. Another -- Anna Marie Lane -- actually received a soldier's pension from the Virginia Assembly at the close of the Revolution.


Deborah Sampson
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Deborah Sampson
This drawing of Deborah Sampson from 1797 appeared just fourteen years after the end of the war.


Valley Forge
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Valley Forge
Here are Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette at the frigid-cold army headquarters at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.


A Soldier at Valley Forge
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A Soldier at Valley Forge
Here is one of the shoeless, poorly-clothed American soldiers at Valley Forge. In April, 1778 George Washington wrote to a congressman: "to see men without clothes ... without blankets ... without shoes ... marching through frost and snow ... their marches ... traced by the blood from their feet ... and submitting to it without a murmur, is a mark of patience and obedience which in my opinion can scarce be parallel'd."


Nathanael Greene
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Nathanael Greene
Nathanael Greene was a Rhode Island-born Quaker who rose to become one of the highest officers in the Continental Army.


The Battle at Yorktown
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The Battle at Yorktown
This French engraving depicts the battle of Yorktown, with the French and American troops surrounding the British, and the French fleet keeping the British navy at bay.



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