Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
Freedom: A History of US.
Webisode Menu Tools & Activities For Teachers About the Series Search This Site
Intro games Test Your Knowledge Freedom Stories Image Browser Get Involved!
Freedom: A History of US.
HOME






Back to Top

Back to Top


Back to Top
Image Browser -- Choose a time period:
Search for images on Picture History

Search for Images on Picture History

Click here to access thousands of historical images.

Explore Now!

Webisode 4: 1788-1850 Page: 1 | 2

A Map of New York
enlarge


A Map of New York
This 1817 map of the northern states shows how far apart Lake Erie and the Hudson River were. A canal to connect these waterways would have to be 363 miles long.



Digging the Erie Canal
enlarge


Digging the Erie Canal
In this sketch, work proceeds on the Erie Canal in 1820, five years before the canal's completion.


Opening the Erie Canal
enlarge


Opening the Erie Canal
The Erie Canal was officially opened on October 26, 1825 when the first boat, the Seneca Chief shown here left Buffalo for New York City. It arrived less than two weeks later on November 4 and was greeted by great fanfare. By the mid 1830s the canal was doing a brisk business. The canal was the brainchild of New York's Governor, Dewitt Clinton, and this illustration of the Seneca Chief's historic passage comes from a painting at Dewitt Clinton High School in New York City.


The Erie Canal in Rochester
enlarge


The Erie Canal in Rochester
Here is what the Erie Canal looked like in 1900 as it wended its way through Rochester, New York.


Robert Fulton
enlarge


Robert Fulton
Robert Fulton, shown here with his famous ship painted in the background, was inventor of the steamboat.


A Steamboat
enlarge


A Steamboat
More than a hundred years after Fulton's Clermont began steaming up and down the Hudson River, a new steamship, named after Robert Fulton, travels along the same river.


The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad
enlarge


The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad
Here is the Baltimore and Ohio railroad passenger car as it looked in 1830. A single horse pulled the coach along its tracks.


Peter Cooper
enlarge


Peter Cooper
New York City-born inventor, manufacturer, and civic benefactor, Peter Cooper (shown here) grew up in relative poverty and all his life regretted his almost total lack of formal education. A prolific inventor, he worked on the steam engine, a cloth-shearing machine, and boat-towing equipment. His greatest philanthropic effort was the Cooper Union, a free school for scientific and artistic teaching. Cooper oversaw the laying of the trans-Atlantic cable, and served as president of the firm that went on to lay the transcontinental telegraph. He died a leading citizen of New York.


Peter Cooper's Tom Thumb
enlarge


Peter Cooper's Tom Thumb
Here in this photograph from the early twentieth century is Peter Cooper's original 1829 railroad engine "Tom Thumb." You can see the steam boiler in the center of the car.


Illinois Central RR
enlarge


Illinois Central RR
In this 1853 ad for the Illinois Central Railroad, daily passenger service is offered along the sixty-mile corridor between Bloomington and LaSalle. As can be seen in this illustration, the steam engines were fired by wood and had to be stoked regularly.



Email to a Friend
how to get involved