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Webisode 6: 1861-1865 Page: 1 | 2

Young Soldier Boy
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Young Soldier Boy
More than three million Americans would fight in the Civil War, and 600,000 men would die in it. Many were barely more than boys, and some literally were boys, like the one shown here.



Woman With Her Black Servant
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Woman With Her Black Servant
Slaves helped southern gentry live in considerable opulence. Here the actress and singer Ada Webb, from New Orleans, is photographed around 1860 with a slave boy in attendance. (The picture was taken in New York City to which Ada eventually moved after marrying a Yankee.)


The Bull Run
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The Bull Run
The Bull Run (shown here) was little more than a muddy creek wending its way through the Virginia countryside. But the battle that took place here on July 21, 1861 made the stream famous.


Stonewall Jackson
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"Stonewall" Jackson
Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, seen here meeting with General Robert E. Lee on May 2, 1863, was one of the best loved generals in the South. He got his nickname at the Battle of Bull Run in 1861 when in the midst of retreating Confederate soldiers he refused to give way. "Look, there is Jackson standing like a stone wall!" cried out another general. And "Stonewall" Jackson he would ever afterwards be called.


Harriet Beecher Stowe
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Harriet Beecher Stowe
Harriet Beecher Stowe is shown here as she looked around 1852, the year of her earth-shattering novel, UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.


Abraham Lincoln and his Generals
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Abraham Lincoln and his Generals
In this photographic montage Lincoln sits surrounded by some of his favorite generals. From left to right are: David Farragut, William T. Sherman, George Thomas, Joseph Hooker, Philip Sheridan, and Winfield Scott Hancock. The portrait on the wall is of Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott.


William Tecumseh Sherman
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William Tecumseh Sherman
William Tecumseh Sherman was one of a handful of highly effective generals in the West. In September, 1863 he would assume command of the Army of the Tennessee.


Ulysses S. Grant
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Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant, seen here as photographed by Mathew Brady in late 1862, came to Lincoln's attention after his capture of Forts Henry and Donelson in Tennessee earlier that year. It was at Fort Donelson that he earned his nickname, "unconditional surrender" Grant.


Winfield Scott
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Winfield Scott
Seventy-five years old in 1861, Lieutenant General Winfield Scott was the highest ranking officer in the United States Army. He once said he had dined with every president since Thomas Jefferson, and in his opinion Abraham Lincoln was the best of them all. After the Union defeat at Bull Run, Scott resigned from the Army.


George B. McClellan
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George B. McClellan
General George B. McClellan was placed at the head of the Army of the Potomac after its defeat at the Battle of Bull Run. In just a few months "Little Mac" transformed his troops into a fine fighting machine. On November 1 he succeeded General Winfield Scott as general-in-chief. But he was beset by a reluctance to engage the enemy.



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