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Webisode 6: 1861-1865 Page: 1 | 2

Dead Soldiers at Antietam
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Dead Soldiers at Antietam
These Confederate soldiers -- killed at Antietam on September 17, 1862 -- were photographed by Alexander Gardner just two days later. The white building in the background is Dunker Church.



Lincoln at Antietam
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Lincoln at Antietam
On October 4, two weeks after the Battle of Antietam, President Lincoln made a trip to the field to see it with his own eyes. Here he is standing with Allan Pinkerton and General John McClernand at George B. McClellan's headquarters.


Frederick Douglass
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Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass spent January 1, 1863 in Tremont Temple in Boston, Massachusetts with 3,000 others, waiting for word of Lincoln's signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Finally, toward midnight, the awaited telegram arrived. When it was read aloud to the largely African-American crowd the Temple erupted. "I never saw Joy before," Douglass later narrated. "Men, women, young and old, were up; hats and bonnets were in the air." Finally, said Douglass, the war was being fought for a truly noble purpose.


Black Soldiers
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Black Soldiers
After January 1, 1863 large numbers of black soldiers were recruited into the Union Army. Eventually almost 200,000 would serve, about half of whom had formerly been slaves in the South. In this photograph, black soldiers relax outside their tent sometime in the latter days of the Civil War.


Dead Soldiers at Gettysburg
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Dead Soldiers at Gettysburg
This photograph, taken on July 5 or 6, 1863, shows Confederate soldiers killed at Gettysburg on the second day of fighting.


Winfield Scott Hancock
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Winfield Scott Hancock
Here is Union General Winfield Scott Hancock, who played a vital role in repelling Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. Shown here as he looked around 1870, Hancock never fully recovered from the wounds he received that day.


Crowd Gathered at Gettsyburg
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Crowd Gathered at Gettsyburg
The photographer Alexander Gardner took this extraordinary photograph at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863 -- the day of Lincoln's great address. A huge crowd has gathered; President Lincoln is somewhere to the left of the tent.


Lincoln at the Time of the Gettysburg Address
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Lincoln at the Time of the Gettysburg Address
In this extreme blow-up of a photograph taken probably by David Bachrach, the face of Abraham Lincoln can been seen on the speaker's stand at Gettysburg. (He is the bearded man without a hat, looking downwards, a little left and up from center in the photograph.) The exciting discovery of Lincoln's face in this remarkable photograph was made in 1953 by Josephine Cobb of the National Archives.


Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
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Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
Here is Ulysses S. Grant as he looked at the end of the Civil War. In February, 1864 a special bill had been passed restoring the rank of lieutenant general, with the understanding that Grant alone would be named to the rank. He was, on March 2, 1864.


John Wilkes Booth
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John Wilkes Booth
John Wilkes Booth was a well-known actor with strong pro-Confederate leanings. For months he had been attempting to kidnap Abraham Lincoln and hold him for ransom on behalf of the Confederacy. After his last attempt failed on March 17, Booth decided to kill the President. As an actor he had no trouble entering Ford's theatre on the night of April 14 and shooting Abraham Lincoln at close range.



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