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Webisode 8: 1865-1875 Page: 1 | 2

The Triumphal Arch
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"The Triumphal Arch"
The reason so many immigrants have wanted to come to the United States is because of America's reputation for offering a good life under a good government. This 1903 cartoon depicts immigrants streaming through a "triumphal arch" into the shining new land of opportunity. Eastern European Jews called America "the golden land"; the Chinese spoke of it as "the golden mountain."



Immigrants on an Atlantic Ocean Liner
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Immigrants on an Atlantic Ocean Liner
In this photograph by Edwin Levick, taken on the deck of the S.S. Patricia on December 12, 1910, hundreds of European emigrants are packed together.


Ellis Island
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Ellis Island
Here is the main building of the U.S. Immigration Station at Ellis Island in New York Harbor. Opened in December, 1900, after the burning of an earlier building, this brick and stone ediface was fireproof and designed to accommodate up to a half a million immigrants a year. Soon, more than twice that number were arriving at Ellis Island annually. In 1924 Congress put an end to mass immigration, and the era of Ellis Island ground to a close.


The Sioux Indian Leader, American Horse
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The Sioux Indian Leader, American Horse
Here is the Sioux Leader American Horse, who worked hard trying to avoid violence in the weeks leading up to the Battle of Wounded Knee. "How long will you hold out?" he asked his young men. "Your country is surrounded with a network of railroads; thousands of white soldiers will be here within ... days." American Horse was later appalled when government soldiers turned their guns on unarmed Indians.


Cheap Labor
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"Cheap Labor"
This illustration from an 1876 issue of HARPER'S WEEKLY depicts cheap Chinese labor as a comet flashing across the sky-a burning issue of the day.


The American Party Ticket
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The American Party Ticket
The American Party -- also known as the Know-Nothing Party -- flouished in the United States in the 1850s. Here is the party emblem in 1854. Though it officially died out by the end of the decade, its influence continued to be felt for a long time.


An Anti-Chinese Advertisement
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An Anti-Chinese Advertisement
Even commercials in the 1880s could be racist. In this soap advertisement, Uncle Sam is portrayed as kicking out Chinese labor as part of a clean-up America campaign.


Mary Antin
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Mary Antin
Mary Antin was just thirteen when she arrived in the United States. Here she is around the time of the publication of her second book, a plea for unrestricted immigration entitled, They Who Knock at our Doors.


Jewish Immigrants in New York City
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Jewish Immigrants in New York City
In the picture here from 1907, Jewish immigrants mingle in front of their shops in New York City.


Chief Gall
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Chief Gall
Here is Chief Gall (otherwise known as Pizi), a Hunkpapa Dakota chief who served under Crazy Horse. He is said to have been the one who killed George Armstrong Custer at Little Bighorn.



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