Alice Paul


Alice Paul

Alice Paul never gave up. She wasn't afraid of controversy or criticism either. She single-mindedly pursued the woman's right to vote.

Paul, who earned degrees in social work and law, joined the woman's suffrage movement while studying in England. When she returned to the United States, she brought some of the radical tactics English women had used to lobby for the right to vote: picketing, hunger strikes, protests, and rallies.

Paul helped organize huge parades in which masses of women wearing white dresses marched for the right to vote. She worked with other woman's rights groups for a while, but eventually started her own, called the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. She was imprisoned several times, and even put into solitary confinement and force-fed. But she refused to give up, and her labors helped earn passage of the Nineteenth Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote.



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