Lou Gehrig


Lou Gehrig

Called "The Iron Horse," "Larrupin' Lou," and the "Pride of the Yankees," Lou Gehrig's life was an American success story. But his story had a tragic ending when he died from ALS, a disease that slowly paralyzes all parts of the body. This disease is now commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Gehrig was born in New York City in 1903, the son of a janitor. He waited on tables to pay for his education at Columbia University. In 1923 he went to work for the New York Yankees as their first baseman.

During his amazing career, Lou Gehrig led the American League in runs batted in five times. In 1931, he broke the league record with 184 runs batted in. He was voted the American League's most valuable player in 1927 and 1936. In 1932, he became the first twentieth century player to hit four home runs in a row in one game. Gehrig entered the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939 after his tearful exit from baseball. He died in 1941.



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