Raccoon Nation
Production Credits

DIRECTOR
SUSAN K. FLEMING

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
NICK DE PENCIER

CAMERA
KEITH BRUST
ONNO WEEDA
RUSSELL GIENAPP
JOHN & JANET FOSTER
SUSAN FLEMING

EDITOR
CAROLE LARSEN

WRITER
SIOBHAN FLANAGAN

ORIGINAL MUSIC
CHRIS WHITELY
WITH SPECIAL GUEST
RICK FINES

NARRATOR
NORA YOUNG

PRODUCTION MANAGER/BUSINESS AFFAIRS
ANDREA MINTY

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
GEORGIA KOVALIK

SOUND RECORDISTS
NICK DE PENCIER
PAUL ADLAF
SANJAY MEHTA

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
MICHAEL LAING-FRASER

RESEARCH
SYLVIA MAGRYS
DEA SAGNELLA
ELIZABETH COOK

WRANGLERS
MUSKOKA WILDLIFE CENTRE

JAPAN FIXER
ANNE PICK

GRAPHIC DESIGN
PETER KOVALIK

STOCK MUSIC
TTG MUSIC

POST PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
JOSEPH MURNAGHAN

COLORIST/ON-LINE EDITOR
DAVID HEDLEY
MARK DRIVER

VISUAL EFFECTS
ERIC WHEATLEY

SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR
DAVID ROSE

DIALOGUE EDITOR
BARRY GILMOUR

ASSISTANT SOUND EDITOR
KRYSTIN HUNTER

FOLEY ARTISTS
ANDY MALCOLM
GORO KOYAMA

RE-RECORDING MIXER
LOU SOLAKOFSKI

PUBLICITY
JILL SPITZ

TRANSLATION/TRANSCRIPTION
MAKIKO ISHIHARA
BRENDAN KOVALIK
JANNA LÜTTMANN
KIRSTIN TURNBULL

VOICEOVER CAST
KAI KRUEGER
MINA KITAGAWA
OLAF RELITZKI
GORO KOYAMA

STOCK FOOTAGE COURTESY OF
JOHN & JANET FOSTER
CORBIS CANADA
GOOGLE MAPS

SPECIAL THANKS:
MURRAY KREUZER
FRANK BEEKER
THE MONKS OF MANPUKUJI TEMPLE
NATALIE RAMB
DR. STAN GEHRT
CONSTANCE LAING
DR. SUZANNE MACDONALD
BILL SPAHIC
MARC DUPUIS-DESORMEAUX
KATHLEEN TAYLOR
DR. ANDREW IWANIUK
BILL DOWD
DR. MIEKO KAWAMICHI
STEVEN GOOD
FRANK UWE-MICHLER
ELIZABETH BRAATEN
BERIT KOEHENEMANN
MOIRA DEVEREAUX
DR. GRAHAM CRAWSHAW
BRUCE YOUNG & FAMILY
GABBY MULLER & STEPHAN MICHAEL
THE TORONTO ZOO

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER FOR CBC
MICHAEL ALLDER

SENIOR PRODUCER FOR CBC
CAROLINE UNDERWOOD

“Rascal the Raccoon”
© Produced by Nippon Animation Co.
Broadcast on Fuji Television Network
Based on the novel “Rascal, A Memoir of a Better Era” by Sterling North
Opening Theme song: “Rock River e”
Performed by Kumiko Oosugi
Series Original Music by Takeo Watanabe

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
SUSAN FLEMING

PRODUCED IN ASSOCIATION WITH
THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

PRODUCED WITH THE PARTICIPATION OF
THE CANADIAN MEDIA FUND/Fonds Canadien de television
Created by the Government of Canada and the Canadian Cable Industry
ROGERS DOCUMENTARY FUND and ROGERS TELEFUND

PRODUCED WITH THE ASSITANCE OF
THE CANADA FILM OR VIDEO PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT
THE ONTARIO MEDIA DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FILM AND TELEVISION TAX CREDITS
CANADIAN FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS

Produced by Raccoons Inc. © 2011

FOR NATURE

SERIES EDITOR
JANET HESS

SUPERVISING PRODUCER
JANICE YOUNG

SENIOR PRODUCER
LAURA METZGER LYNCH

PRODUCTION MANAGER
JULIE SCHAPIRO THORMAN

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
JAYNE JUN

RE-RECORDING MIXER
ED CAMPBELL

HD ONLINE EDITOR
PATRICK KRASS

SERIES PRODUCER
BILL MURPHY

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
FRED KAUFMAN

Produced by Raccoons Inc. in association with THIRTEEN for WNET

This program was produced by Raccoons Inc. which is solely responsible for its content.

© 2012 THIRTEEN
All rights reserved

WEB CREDITS

PRODUCER
KATE FULTON

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
CHIE WITT

RESEARCH AND WRITING
MOLLY FERRILL

DESIGNER
JOY WEEENG

PAGEBUILDING
BRIAN SANTALONE

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
BRIAN LEE

CREATIVE DIRECTOR
NICK MILLER

SENIOR DIRECTOR
DANIEL B. GREENBERG

  • Michael Lewis,Ph.D.

    I really enjoyed this video. The scientific and naturalistic information was wonderful and I plan to use some of the information in my classes. I was, however, dismayed that at least one on the Toronto scientists kept referring to “the data is…” and other references to data as singular. The singular form is “datum” and it is something that labor to have my students learn.
    Thank you for the good work.
    Sincerly
    Michael Lewis< Ph.D.
    Professor

  • Shawnee Bray

    Hi
    I really enjoyed your PBS special tonight “Racoon Nation”.

    It never even occured to me that racoons would have a wider range than the 3 or 4 square blocks you mentioned.
    Over my lifetime I have seen their incredible ability to survive and adapt. Humans desire to live in such an artificial world, excluding this born naturalist of course. After all we are the #1 invasive species on the planet, as such we can only expect to continue to screw up our wild and wonderful treasures, don’t you think?

    Here I am, a born gifted naturalist who has the ability to see things in ways others can’t or else it might take science who knows how long to figure things out. I’m not being arrogant, I’m being perfectly honest and real here.
    Imagine a real life Darwin, John Muir, Einstein or a combo package of them, living in a world knowing just how rare and endangered I am? Now nearly 56 years old, I have spent my lifetime hiking in natural lands, backpack, field guides plus other books, companion dogs at my side and loving every single moment of this lifelong students natural classroom. Nature has shown and taught me so much, that I can’t help but wonder when the scientific community will come up to my speed. Huh! Oh, to be born with a high powered mind representing only 3% of the most intelligent people. I have a high school graduation and some college, but I, like Einstein and other gifted persons, we bore easily when having to learn the standard program. Now finally, we are becoming recognized at last. I’ve never heard anyone refer to my kind as a sort of psychic naturalist, but I’d have to say that it sounds pretty good to me. Then again, I wouldn’t be surprised if the term becomes mentioned someday. I am as deep as the oceans. I can hyperfocus and research on a subject of interest on the levels of ????? But my real genius is when I am emotionally supported and allowed to freelance my mind. Then you can bet I’ll fly to new heights and take anyone along with me who was kind enough to support this strange gifted intellect. Now science says that I am born with a central nervous system that is highly sensitive. Sort of like that of a horse or a deer. If I could add to this notion, I would like to offer one of my goofy jokes. What do you call a canine when it puts its nose up in the air to take a big wiff?
    SmellNar! Ha! Its on the level of Radar and Sonar. Sharks have this same sense of SmellNar too. I would know because I use to love swimming among them. When I learned how bad Moray eels vision was, I had to test that out for myself too. So I began to feed them small bits of sardine while scuba diving in the FL. Keys . In fact, I not only learned how poor their vision is, but I learned how their sense of smell made up for their poor eyesight. I was even amazed at how calm and friendly barracuda’s behaved when I spent time on the reefs feeding them little morsels of sardine from my hand covered with a good glove of course. Yet this has been my life. Exploring, adventuring, learning and most of all intensive observations into the wild and wonderful treasures on Earth. Maybe you might be interested in meeting a person like me, no?
    I will be happy to prove everything I say. In fact, take a guess right now what road kill I found recently that is in my freezer? Ha! Sorry, but I do have a quirky sense of humor. I am now trying to learn how I might preserve or taxidermy this magnificent find.
    I have a dog who locates the dead sea turtle eggs every season along our beaches by the dozens if not hundreds. Now this is a PBS special if I could ever offer one! The baby sea turtles are dead and decomposing in their eggs because I’m not allowed to locate others who love them as I do and rescue them by digging up the nests as the seawater rises seasonally, and dig them a new nest further up on the dunes.
    I did this 30 years ago in Ft. Lauderdale, but for some reason the experts haven’t figured out how simple it is and how it works. Sorry, but I get angry by all the authority control freaks who are more interested in their positions then they are for the animal rights they seem to have forgotten they work for.
    Racoons are far smarter than humans will give them credit for. But I think we both agree on this one.
    Humans are the dysfunctional species of the natural world that causes all the other natural species to eventually appear dysfunctional to our standards. Whew! Why am I able to see this so clearly when others can’t. Gift or Curse? Don’t ask me to answer that. Anywho, here’s a subject you might be interested in making another PBS special on. The Atala Butterfly, once considered extinct in So. FL. during 1960-1965. The Atala, one of the world’s most beautiful butterflies host plant is the ancient cycad known as the “Coontie” (a common ground cover plant during dinosaur era’s) was harvested for its flour to make Arrowroot cookies.
    In 2008, The Stuart News, did an article on me and my company WildThing Landscape, Inc. because the atala larva showed up on one of my landscape jobs because I planted numerous Coontie, knowing that nature will find a way. One day there they were! And now I know of a location where there are hundreds of adults flying around, doing courtship displays, mating, egg laying, and crystilis all over coontie plants. I’ve invited a few persons to go on a field trip with me to see this magnificent return, yet no one seems as delighted as me to run out and see them. So I’m offering it to you in the hopes you might know someone who might want to educate humans on the fact that, if they plant native regional plants, they will no doubt see the return of numerous endangered species. It’s really that simple. And these Atala’s prove it. What a magnificent story of their comeback! Did you know that if a female butterfly can’t locate a species of her host plant, she will die with her eggs inside of her? The Monarch, the most popular butterfly, must find either a milkweed or hemp plant species. If she can’t, she too will die with her eggs unlayed. Butterflies are that specific. In fact, I have come to learn that all of nature and natural ecosystems are that specific.
    Time for me to call it a night, I can hear the sheets calling. Sure hope to hear from someone.
    Be good, Shawnee

  • Candace McCutcheon

    My daughter’s cat absolutely loves “Raccoon Nation.” She is literally transfixed whenever I put it on. She most especially enjoys the part where the mother raccoon is trying to teach her “Kitts” how to “Collapse your spine,” teaching by example, how to slink into a locked shed for a place to rest.

  • Eric Koester

    Thanks for an interesting program! You did a nice job with your camera work and image quality!

    I think I see the “fingerprints” of Canon digital SLRs in use…Canon 5D Mark 2?
    I’m betting you had the IR filter removed from the sensor for use in your night scenes?

    Interested to know…
    Eric
    Minneapolis, MN

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