Salmon: Running the Gauntlet
Production Credits

NARRATED BY
JAY O. SANDERS

PRODUCED BY
JIM NORTON
ROB WHITTLESEY

STORY BY
JIM NORTON

WRITERS
ROB WHITTLESEY
JIM NORTON

SUPERVISING PRODUCER
MARK SHELLEY

EDITOR
ROB WHITTLESEY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
MARK SHELLEY

ORIGINAL MUSIC
MARK ADLER

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
HANNAH WALKER

ADDITIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHY
BOB POOLE
HARRY DAWSON

PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS
BLAISE DUROS
CHRISTINE MALLIA

SOUND RECORDISTS
SPENCE PALERMO
LARRY JOHNSON
TYLER B. STEPHENS

PRODUCTION MANAGER
BROOK HOLSTON

ASSISTANT EDITOR
PHILLIP POWELL

ANIMATIONS
ANDY MURDOCK
LOTS OF ROBOTS, INC

ONLINE EDITOR
RI CRAWFORD

SOUND DESIGN
BRIAN BEATRICE

RE-RECORDING MIXER
BRIAN BEATRICE

COLOR GRADING
LEO HALLAL

HI-DEFINITION POST PRODUCTION
ZAP-ZOETROPE AUBRY PRODUCTIONS

PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT
SHEILA TAYLOR

STOCK FOOTAGE/STILLS
Alaska Video Postcards, Inc.
Always HD
Bjornen and Isaac Babcock
Columbia River Maritime Museum
Mark Emery
FISHBIO
FootageBank HD
Freshwaters Illustrated
Grants Pass Daily Courier
Greenfire Productions
Grizzly Creek Films
HD/Environments / Footage Search
Katmai National Park, U.S. National Park Service
Mammoth HD
Andy Maser
McCord Museum, Montreal
NHNZ / Footage Search
Oregon State University Archives
Photolibrary / Oxford Scientific Films
Pond 5
Portland General Electric
Printroom
Twyla Roscovich
David Rice / Footage Search
Hannah Smith Walker
Thought Equity Motion / National Geographic Digital Motion
United States Bureau of Reclamation
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections
Kennan Ward / Footage Search
Norbert Wu / Footage Search
Daniel Zatz / Footage Search

SPECIAL THANKS
Shari Sant Plummer, Code Blue
Bert Bowler, Snake River Salmon Solutions
Bird Research Northwest
Bonneville Power Administration
Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission
Fishhawk Fisheries
Charles Hudson
Bob Hunter, Waterwatch
Idaho Adventures
Idaho Fish and Game
Indian Creek Guest Ranch
Jim Lichatowich
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Jeff Oveson, Grand Ronde Model Watershed
Sarah Thompson
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District
U.S. Army Public Affairs, Western Region
Wallace Fish Station
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

FOR NATURE

SERIES EDITOR
JANET HESS

SUPERVISING PRODUCER
JANICE YOUNG

SENIOR PRODUCER
LAURA METZGER

PRODUCER
IRENE TEJARATCHI HESS

PRODUCTION MANAGER
JULIE SCHAPIRO THORMAN

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
JAYNE JUN

RE-RECORDING MIXER
ED CAMPBELL

HD ONLINE EDITOR
PATRICK KRASS

OFFLINE EDITOR
IRENE TEJARATCHI HESS

SERIES PRODUCER
BILL MURPHY

EXECUTIVE IN CHARGE
WILLIAM GRANT

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
FRED KAUFMAN

A Production of Sea Studios Foundation and THIRTEEN in association with WNET New York Public Media and National Geographic Channel

This program was produced by THIRTEEN, which is solely responsible for its content.

© 2011 WNET
All rights reserved

WEB CREDITS

PRODUCER
KATE FULTON

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
CHIE WITT

PRODUCTION ASSISTANCE
SAM CHUNG
PIYALI SYAM

DESIGNER
JOY WEEENG

PAGEBUILDING
BRIAN SANTALONE

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
BRIAN LEE

CREATIVE DIRECTOR
NICK MILLER

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY
DAVID HIRMES

SENIOR DIRECTOR
DANIEL B. GREENBERG

WRITERS
SAM CHUNG
PIYALI SYAM

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  • David Bean

    Dear JIM NORTON & ROB WHITTLESEY

    Absolutely top notch. I have studied and worked with salmon for a dozen years and could not tell the story any better. I do have the sequel in hand, and would wish for you two guys to realize it. I founded Wild Salmon Nation in 1991. It would be fun.

    And as a coincidence, my band teacher as I grew up was Marg Whittlesey. Either that or kindergarten

    I do not mean for this to be a post, but a communication to Jim Norton, Rob Whittlesey or some fine person on this excellent team that can make it happen. ________yours David Bean

  • Bill

    Excellent program!
    For follow up or another episode, I hope you will consider a trip to New England. We have Atlantic salmon here and their crash has been devastating and dramatic. Cities like Bangor, Maine were reliant upon these salmon. A massive multi-million dollar effort is now underway to remove dams on the Penobscot River.

    Likewise, river herring are a keystone species in New England. Alewife and Blueback Herring have been the basis for fisheries since pre-colonial times. If you wonder why Gloucester and New Bedford, Mass developed as fishing hubs, the herring are the reason. People in Massachusetts still have a close connection with herring even though they are illegal to catch. Herring runs attract many residents. Community fish-frys, once using herring plucked out of the river now use frozen fish. Still people flock to rivers to watch the spectacle of the migration and think about what once was. The industrial revolution began in Rhode Island and soon thousands of dams blocked the migration of the herring. Runs in the millions are now in the dozens as spawning areas were cut off.

    Massachusetts has made a major investment in trying to remove obsolete and dangerous dams. It will take years until we know if it works. I encourage you to contact the Mass. Department of Fish and Game to learn about these important efforts. I also encourage you to look at herring and the people the way you did on the Columbia.
    Again, great work.

  • TD Moser

    An absolutely wonderfully well-done program! It causes pause for what once was, as well as what can still be. We applaud you for your efforts and taking the considerable amount of time and money to help us understand what impact we have made on the world in the past 75 years. Were it not for people like you, many of us would not know the adverse effect of our actions until it is too late. Thank you.

  • Bonnie Moore

    What a surprise to see our apple orchard canal in a brief snippet of your video! It must have been taken in the mid 1980’s before the canal went underground. The camera person stood at the top of the hill on our driveway facing East towards Yakima. How we have missed that open running water.

    It was a great program on Salmon and helped us to understand more of the importance of preserving the natural environment.

    Bonnie & Jerry Moore

  • James J. DiStefano

    I am a retired wildlife biologist who worked for 3 different states in the Northeast after my first career in an engineering environment.

    I’ve certainly labored with, and eventually supervised, fishery biologists including the good staffs of the proverbial hatcheries who have tried intensely to make the “system work”. Our salmon efforts were daunting and limited to one ancestral species – the Atlantic Salmon and, in spite of those heroic efforts, have been only modestly successful. And, I would not argue with those who profess a failed mission.

    As a retiree, there is still the obsession with things environmental as well as resource management. Your production re: the history and efforts on the Columbia River is monumentally good . . . my congratulations to all of you involved in the production. Your selection of participants like Messrs. Myers, Duncan and others to augment the biologists and specialists was exceptionally good — their knowledge and criticism duly noted.

    Having invested time in both worlds — the private sector working with engineers and physical scientists on important cold war and “man on the moon” projects as well as my later biological responsibilities in the public sector — provides some insight augmenting what wisdom I may have through the passage of time.

    Clearly, we have not truly understood, nor adequately respected the millions of years of evolution that have ultimately provided our natural systems. Those natural systems will continue to resist our technological innovations that have influenced us to attempt to historically intervene in many areas that go way beyond the well-placed concern for salmon.

    It’s time to “bite the bullet” and insure some cross-pollination of knowledge pertaining to engineering, physical sciences, economics and business studies with life sciences and biology. Our overpopulated species have challenges and work ahead of us if succeeding generations are to survive.

  • Dennis Ruuspakka

    We were mesmerized by this outstanding production. Could you please EMail me with the name (or link to) of the Native American song/chant playing in the background several times in the lasr 1/2 hour or so.

    Thank You!

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