The Wolf That Changed America
Video: Lobo Takes the Bait

Ernest Thompson Seton ventures out to check his baits, slabs of meat laced with poison. He follows Lobo’s tracks and discovers that Lobo has taken several of the baits. Expecting to find Lobo’s dead body, Seton continues on. At the fourth bait, however, he realizes that Lobo may be smarter than he’d thought.

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.
  • Ruth C Uppena

    This was A most interesting and touching story!More stuff like this!

  • Matt

    I love Nature, and this story.

    However, I find it to be a little misleading after reading Seton’s own account. For example, Blanca was not shot. She was lassoed twice and pulled between two horses..

  • James Dixon

    I just wanted to say thanks for airing this show. I used to be a zookeeper and it was great to here conservation efforts stared so long ago.

  • Margaret Nason

    I did not see the whole program, but I loved it. How can I get a DVD or a VHS of this program? MARGARET

  • Debra

    I found the program well done, as most PBS features are. One of my favorite networks……but, after searching for the “Lobo” photos, I had to wince while looking……..I hope that the female, “Blanca” was shot before being pulled apart with ropes…….

  • R. CARNEVALE

    I THOUGHT IT WAS A BEAUTIFUL STORY….DID SETON WRITE THIS AND WAS IT A TRUE VERSION OF WHAT HAPPENED?

  • ari

    minblowing! heroic, passionate, beautiful! kids, never mind sport stars and athlete’s get into nature!

  • Jimmy

    One of my favorite PBS shows yet. Truly a great tale.

  • Bernie

    In my school, St. Brendan’s College, Bristol UK, some 50 years ago this year, I was awarded the book “The Best of Ernest Thompson Seton”. I remember being entralled by the tale of Lobo and am delighted PBS has chosen to produce it for TV. PBS, you are the best!

  • Co

    i have like 26 pictures of animals
    on my sealing and wall

  • chance

    I BELEIVE THIS WAS AN INCREDIBLE VIDEO. I MYSELF AM A HUGE FAN OF WOLVES AND WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT IF WOLVES COME HERE LET THEM BE BUT IF THEY CAUSE TROUBLE LET THE PERSON WHO THE WOLF IS CAUSING TROUBLE TAKE CARE OF THEM. OTHER THAN THAT I SAY LEAVE THEM ALONE. THEY MAY BE A NUICENCE BUT THEY ARE STILL A MAJOR PART OF US. LLLEEEAAAVVVEEE TTTHHHEEEMMM AAALLLOOONNNEEE…

    OTHER THAN THAT IT WAS VERY ENJOYABLE AS IS THE REST OF THE SITE

  • Darren Thiesen

    Great story. It is like a real life Captain Ahab and his quest to capture the whale.

  • Marc McFarland

    I believe animals, wolves in particular, are much more intelligent then we give them credit for. Also, just like dogs, wolves have many millions more scent receptors in their noses then we do so they will sometimes know if a food source has been poisoned. Unfortunately sometimes hunger will compel them to eat something even if they know somethings up with it. I really love how the wolf Lobo in the story picked up all the poisoned baits and placed them all together in the same place and then covered them with filth so that no other wolves would find them and eat them. Weather that actually happened or if Seton just put that in the story as artistic license, it goes to show you just how clever wolves can be.

  • Ann

    I have a soft heart for wolves and when I found this video, I just had to struggle hard to keep from crying.

  • s

    not so much a GREAT STORY as a PATHETIC TALE… we not only destroy nature but we add vexation and disrespect to destruction… pulling an animal apart with ropes, while its partner is looking: well, that’s what the reason the expression “MONSTER” was created…

  • mr nice

    http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/readfile?pageno=9&fk_files=1322559

    Then followed the inevitable tragedy, the idea of which I shrank from
    afterward more than at the time. We each threw a lasso over the neck of
    the doomed wolf, and strained our horses in opposite directions until
    the blood burst from her mouth, her eyes glazed, her limbs stiffened
    and then fell limp. Homeward then we rode, carrying the dead wolf, and
    exulting over this, the first death-blow we had been able to inflict on
    the Currumpaw pack.

    At intervals during the tragedy, and afterward as we rode homeward, we
    heard the roar of Lobo as he wandered about on the distant mesas, where
    he seemed to be searching for Blanca. He had never really deserted
    her, but, knowing that he could not save her, his deep-rooted dread of
    firearms had been too much for him when he saw us approaching. All that
    day we heard him wailing as he roamed in his quest, and I remarked at
    length to one of the boys, “Now, indeed, I truly know that Blanca was
    his mate.”

  • Joseph Page

    The absolute best Nature. I thought the one about the wild horses was good, but this one beat it. I was moved to tears. My love for wolves is even greater.

  • Ritchie Norman

    I have hunted for 53 years since 1957. I have had a lot of chances to shot wolfs,but my heart stopped me.Now the year 2010 tells me why.

  • Louise Kane

    what disgusting human beings would do such things to such amazing animals. I am horrified. I hope Earnest Seton went to hell where he belonged.

Produced by THIRTEEN    ©2014 Educational Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.

PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.