The Good, the Bad, and the Grizzly

About

NATURE’s The Good, the Bad, and the Grizzly looks at the grizzly bear’s remarkable recovery and examines the controversy behind the conservation success story.

After a decades-long comeback, the grizzly bears of Yellowstone National Park appear to be thriving. Should they now be removed from the protection of the Endangered Species Act? This question has provoked one of the most emotionally charged wildlife controversies in America today.

In the mid-20th century, Yellowstone’s grizzlies had been reduced to a relatively small number of bears that had stopped hunting and were living on trash intentionally left by the park’s attendants. In 1972, park officials reversed their policy, and the garbage dumps were closed.

Today, after 30 years of protection under the Endangered Species Act, grizzlies have learned to hunt once again, and have made a resounding return, with an estimated 600 thriving in the 17,000 square miles that comprise the Greater Yellowstone area.

With the rising bear population, however, comes conflict, as the grizzlies interact more and more with encroaching humanity — roaming in residential areas, raiding dumpsters, attacking livestock, and unknowingly inspiring tourists to take chances on roads and trails so they can glimpse the great bear.

In short, the success of grizzly restoration has spawned a complex web of social and environmental issues that many disagree upon. While some lawmakers argue that grizzlies should be delisted as an endangered species, others believe this would be a premature maneuver.

Discover the complex issue of grizzly bear management and conservation from ranchers, conservationists, and government officials who share their stories and insights on The Good, the Bad, and the Grizzly.

Online content for The Good, the Bad, and the Grizzly was originally posted November, 2004.

Production Credits Print

Television Credits

Narrated by
CHRIS COOPER

Produced by
SHANE MOORE
JANET HESS

Written by
JANET HESS

Edited by
SANDY OSTERTAG

Original Music by
LENNY WILLIAMS

Principal Photography by
SHANE MOORE

Additional Photography by
SCOTT MCKINLEY
RON SHADE
GREG WINSTON

Stock Footage
BOB LANDIS
CLIFF BROWN
DEREK REICH
JIM YULE
GORDON HOFFMAN
JEFF HOGAN
JOHN ROSS PETERSON
DR. TIMOTHY MILLER

Graphics by
MARCO NORTH

Researcher
B.D. WEHRFRITZ

Field Assistants
ERIC BURGE
SCOTT BOWDLER

Archive Footage
DR. TIMOTHY MILLER
RECORD GROUP 79, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

Special Thanks to
PAT BIGELOW
MARK BRUSCINO
BRIAN DEBOLT
STEVE AND MARILYN FRENCH
LEE LIVINGSTON
SHANNON PADRUZNI
HILLARY ROBISON
TERRY SCHRAMM
CHUCK SCHWARTZ
CHRIS SERVHEEN
LOUISA WILLCOX
WYOMING GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
BRIDGER TETON NATIONAL FOREST
SHOSHONE NATIONAL FOREST


For NATURE:

Series Editor
JANET HESS

Supervising Producer
JANICE YOUNG

Producers
JILL CLARKE
PATTY JACOBSON

Associate Producers
IRENE TEJARATCHI
GIANNA SAVOIE

Production Secretary
KELLY LAFFERTY

Manager
EILEEN FRAHER

Production Manager
JULIE SCHAPIRO THORMAN

Offline Editor
CHRISTOPHER SEWARD

Online Editors
BARRY GLINER
JAY SLOT

Sound Mixer
ED CAMPBELL

Series Producer
BILL MURPHY

Executive In Charge
WILLIAM GRANT

Executive Producer
FRED KAUFMAN

Produced by Moore & Moore productions, Inc. and Thirteen/WNET New York

This program was produced by Thirteen/WNET New York, which is solely responsible for its content.

© 2004 Educational Broadcasting Corporation All Rights Reserved


Web Credits

Producer
DANIEL B. GREENBERG

Designer
MICHAEL DIMAURO

Pagebuilding
BRIAN SANTALONE

Writer
DAVID MALAKOFF

Technical Director
BRIAN LEE

Photos courtesy of the Educational Broadcasting Corporation

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