thumb

Robert Fri

Contributor

Robert Fri is a visiting scholar at Resources for the Future, a nonprofit organization that studies natural resource and environmental issues. He has served as director of the National Museum of Natural History, president of Resources for the Future, and deputy administrator of both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Energy Research and Development Administration. In the private sector, Fri was a director of Transco Energy Company and American Electric Power Company, and started his own firm specializing in energy project development. He has served on several studies at the National Research Council, most recently on the America’s Energy Future and America’s Climate Choices projects.

Thumb

Action on climate change: Why now?

How long do we have before feeling the effects of climate change? The National Academy of Sciences says we know enough to act now. Robert Fri reports.

Thumb

Is a nuclear renaissance possible?

Will nuclear power itself be a casualty of the tragic events in Japan? Robert Fri explains how we can, and why we should, keep it in the mix.

Thumb

Gas prices are up. Will they ever come down?

Oil prices are way up, equal to the peaks of 1980. Back then, market forces (plus greed) kicked in to bring prices back down. Robert Fri explains why that might not happen again.

Thumb

The climate dilemma: How warm and when?

Scientists agree that greenhouse gases will warm the planet. But how much and when? Robert Fri explains the crux of the policy maker’s dilemma.

Thumb

EPA does energy

The EPA can boast of some impressive accomplishments in its first 40 years, but Robert Fri argues that, as a major player in energy policy, the agency must evolve.

Thumb

Energy’s silver buckshot

No single technology is going to solve the nation’s energy problems, but a scattershot approach can work, writes Robert Fri. And there is surprising consensus among those in research.

Thumb

Give me one good reason for a new energy policy

General Electric’s CEO wants a new energy policy, and so do the rest of us. And many presidents have promised one. Robert Fri asks: What’s the holdup?

Thumb

How many energy efficiency experts does it take to change a light bulb?

A recent study shows that homeowners, through their energy decisions, can determine almost 40 percent of the nation’s carbon dioxide emissions. Robert Fri asks: but why is it so hard to buy a simple light bulb that does what you need it to?

Thumb

Awash in natural gas?

Full-page ads promising “clean, domestic and abundant energy” don’t tell the whole story about natural gas, writes Robert Fri. Promising, yes, but it won’t solve all our energy problems.