Colbert head-fakes Congress, Congress asks him to leave

Not everyone seemed to enjoy Stephen Colbert’s headline-grabbing performance at a Congressional subcommittee hearing on immigration reform today.

John Conyers, a Democrat and chair of the House Judiciary Committee, asked the Comedy Central host and faux conservative blowhard to leave the chamber even before Colbert had uttered his first words. Noting that Colbert had drawn as much media coverage as an impeachment proceeding, Conyers suggested that Colbert simply submit his statement for the record and allow the committee to get on with its work. Colbert refused, and deferred to the congresswoman who had invited him, Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California, who allowed Colbert to stay.

And as it turns out, the statement Colbert submitted for the record — the one to which Conyers was referring — was actually quite different from the one he read aloud.

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Could Phil Davison be the next president of the United States?

Last week, The Daily Need brought you the story of Phil Davison, a councilman from the village of Minerva, Ohio, who rocketed to Internet stardom after delivering one of the most intense stump speeches in the history of American politics. Now, some enterprising individual has set that speech against a backdrop of inspirational music and, well, it kind of makes Davison a viable candidate for president of the United States. As Davison told us in an interview last week, he doesn’t have a job, so he’s got plenty of time to mount a national political campaign. And if current polls are any indication, he probably has as much chance of getting elected as Barack Obama.

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Primary education

Yesterday’s primary race in Washington, D.C., makes the new documentary “Waiting for Superman,” by the Academy Award-winning director of “An Inconvenient Truth,” all the more interesting. The movie is about the sad state of public education. One of the main interviewees in the movie, seen as a champion of the kids and foe of the unions, is take-no-prisoners D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee. Well, yesterday the man who appointed Rhee, D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty, lost his primary bid to Councilman Vincent Gray, who has clashed with Rhee and supported the unions.  Gray is almost guaranteed to be the next mayor of Washington, and if he is, it is unlikely Rhee will keep her job. If she leaves, what happens to all her reforms, documented glowingly in this new movie (which opens in LA and New York on September 24, and nationally on October 7)? This one is TBD.

Interview with Phil Davison, the man behind one of the most intense stump speeches ever

Updated | 4:50 p.m. Phil Davison is a councilman in the village of Minerva, Ohio, population 3,934. He has four degrees from the University of Akron — two bachelors degrees, in history and sociology, and two masters degrees, in communication and public administration. He’s worked in factories, at the local Target and, for eight years, as a bailiff at the Stark County Court of Common Pleas. He left that position last year, and has been unable to find work since.

“I’m looking for something right now, to see what turns up,” Davison said in an interview from his home in Minerva. “I’ve been turned down for minimum wage jobs.” He makes a $260-a-month stipend as a village councilman, which adds up to roughly $3,120 a year. “I certainly can’t live on that, but that’s all I’m doing right now.”

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Ariz. gov. doesn’t think ‘beheadings’ are all that interesting after all

Updated | 5:41 p.m. Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer delivered what has been described as a “disastrous” performance in last night’s gubernatorial debate with her Democratic rival, Terry Goddard. Anyone with a working Internet connection has heard or blogged about it by now. But in case you missed it: For 13 seconds, Brewer seemed either to forget what she had done as governor, forget that she was the governor, or just have a Christopher Walken seeing-into-the-future moment, à la “The Dead Zone.”

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