The civil war over climate change

Eric Pooley, author of the new book The Climate War, speaks with Need to Know host Alison Stewart about three big problems: climate change, the economy and the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico; how they are intertwined, and what the president can do to solve them.

Read an excerpt from the book here.

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Comments

  • cicero

    Mr. Poole’s faith in anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is misplaced. The Climategate emails tell us what climate science really is. A cult dominated by its protectors of AGW orthodoxy. The emails reveal that these individuals are not scientists at all but are instead charlatans and political operatives masquerading as scientists.

    What Climategate reveals is that we can have no confidence in proxy temperature reconstructions (the Climategate scientists don’t) which are used to claim unprecedented warming today; that the scientist-advocates will stoop to whatever underhanded ‘tricks’ are necessary to silence opposition and ‘manage’ their message; and that climate science is really just a concerted effort to keep the non-crisis of climate change on the front-burner of public awareness in order to maintain the millions in grants they get each year.

    Until the climate research community is purged of these AGW zealots and crisis-mongers and replaced by real scientists, we will not be able to place any confidence in their ‘research’. We certainly should not be basing public policy on such ‘packaged science’.

  • mikemikef

    When people do not want to believe something and they believe the opposite, they have “cognitive dissonance” [google "cognitive dissonance"] so they are in denial. You know, “the longest river in Egypt”. So, to keep our addiction to oil and other fossil fuels, the multinational corporation buy people to create doubt of the truth just like they did with smoking cigarettes. There are businesses that are in the business of professional denial to serve the fossil fuel multinational corporations. The problem is that simple. One solution is to ask God ["What is the truth about climate change?"], even when you do not believe there is a God. Or something like: How can I find the truth about climate change?”

  • NOTaREALmerican

    Why do liberal intellectuals not understand the peasants? You really need to stop spend so much time at wine-tasting parties.

    America peasants are suspicious of each other. They also know they been screwed by their government – from local to national – for as long as they can remember. As peasants, they know that “the government” is a scam. They are starting to suspect that the economy itself is a Ponzi scheme. For some reason, despite years and years of evidence, liberal intellectuals cannot see the same thing.

    It should be pretty obvious that the US, state, and local governments are totally disfunctional. All exist for the sole purpose of the political insider scumbag to distribute loot to their buddies. The loot is now all concentrated in a few places – the capitals – making it easier for the smart amoral scumbags to looting the system; and yet – the liberal intellectual call for more concentration of power.

    The peasants can see this sliminess. Why would they trust intellectuals about GW? The intellectual – who the peasants know are all liberals anyway – have been scamming them for 40+ years now. Liberal intellectuals will never get the love they crave so badly from the peasants until they stop shilling for socialist wing of the Republicrat Party. The peasants might be dumbasses, but they aren’t stupid.

  • Karlin

    Deniers have more than one blind spot – we should be cutting CO2 emissions for at least two other reasons:
    1] Ocean acidification. Nobody denies this is occuring, or that CO2 emissions are driving it
    2] Pollution – toxins in smog are causing increases in health problems

    How can you find out the truth about climate change? – Wait 100 years, we will know for sure then.
    We are allready too late to do anything to avoid global warming, it is just the severity of the problem 50 years from now, and onwards from there, that we can affect what happens by cutting emissions. It is like the Gulf Spill in that regard – it is too late now because it allready happened, we wished it had not happened, and we are wishing that we would have taken steps before it happened [like not letting the oil industry regulate itself via influence over government].