Black and blue: Portraits of the Gulf

Photographers Kris Krüg, James Duncan Davidson and Pinar Özger  traveled to the Gulf of Mexico to document the effects of the oil spill from plane, truck and boat. Their images will be shown at the TEDx conference on Monday, June 28, which will gather together a host of big brains to share their thoughts, ideas and experiences on the Gulf oil spill.

The stunning images these photographers brought back are vivid reminders of how beautiful the region is — and how much has been lost.

Ships dowse the boom flare to keep it from melting. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Keeping it cool 

Ships dowse the boom flare to keep it from melting. Photo: Pinar Ozger

The oil begins to reach the beach at Gulf Shores.

Gulf Shores, Ala. 

The oil begins to reach the beach at Gulf Shores. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Oil in Barataria Bay, La. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Oiled islands 

Oil in Barataria Bay, La. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Oil in the marshes and islands of Barataria Bay, La. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Oiled wetlands 

Oil in the marshes and islands of Barataria Bay, La. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Trying to keep the oil from spreading. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Boom 

Trying to keep the oil from spreading. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Oil on the surface of the Gulf. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Surface oil 

Oil on the surface of the Gulf. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Oil gathers on the leeward side of barrier islands. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Barrier island 

Oil gathers on the leeward side of barrier islands. Photo: Pinar Ozger

A massive surface slick and a relatively inconsequential burn. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Surface slick 

A massive surface slick and a relatively inconsequential burn. Photo: Pinar Ozger

Oil stained islands in Barataria Bay, La. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Oiled islands 

Oil stained islands in Barataria Bay, La. Photo: Duncan Davidson

A controlled burn on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Burning oil 

A controlled burn on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Photographers Pinar Ozger and Duncan Davidson get in some ground time before heading into the air. Photo: Kris Krug

Preparing for the shoot 

Photographers Pinar Ozger and Duncan Davidson get in some ground time before heading into the air. Photo: Kris Krug

The public is advised not to swim in these waters because of the presence of oil-related chemicals. Photo: Kris Krug

Health advisory 

The public is advised not to swim in these waters because of the presence of oil-related chemicals. Photo: Kris Krug

Signs outside a tattoo parlor in Larose, La. Photo: Kris Krug

Protest art 

Signs outside a tattoo parlor in Larose, La. Photo: Kris Krug

On the road to Grand Isle, La., a community heavily reliant on fishing income.  Photo: Duncan Davidson

Roadside protest 

On the road to Grand Isle, La., a community heavily reliant on fishing income. Photo: Duncan Davidson

Related:

Read a report from the World Wildlife Fund’s Darron Collins about the TedX expedition.

The TEDx Oil Spill Conference

 
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  • jennifer lussier

    I am both horrorfied at what has already taken place on the gulf coast and terrified to think of whats to come. the very far reaching and long term effects of this most mega of disasters that shows no signs of being at an end.