It’s not easy being green



It seemed like a classic “feel-good” economic story. A Midwest factory town loses its biggest employer but reinvents itself as a pioneer in green energy. In 2006, Uni-Solar, a solar panel manufacturing company came to Greenville, Mich., to open up shop. It brought hope and excitement to a beleaguered city. That’s the story we told you last September. But now, is its economic future — based on the power of the sun — thick with clouds? Mona Iskander reports on what went wrong.

 
SUGGESTED STORIES
  • Differing views on fracking's impact
    Studies conducted on the counties above the Marcellus and Barnett Shale for example — where extensive drilling has already taken place — present mixed economic results.
  • thumb
    Too much solar energy?
    The proliferation of privately owned solar has large power companies in Germany worried.
  • thumb
    Nominee has industry ties
    Energy secretary nominee had deep connections to industry, including as a paid adviser to BP until 2011.

Comments

  • ellen ishkanian

    Just stumbled upon this program last week and was fascinated by both it and the correspondent, whom I recognized as a former English student at Pelham Memorial H.S. Mona, you were great, and I was so happy to see that you have become such an accomplished reporter. Keep up your important reporting!!!  Ellen Ishkanian

  • mbee1

    All this story tell us is that government is corrupt.  Throwing tax dollars at some elite campaign donors will not fix anything, it just makes the rest of us poorer.  The Chinese can make and sell a solar panel here for 1 dollar a watt.  If you can do the same open a factory otherwise stop stealing our tax dollars.