Crossing the line at the border: Award-winning reporting

Scripps Howard AwardsNeed to Know’s “Crossing the line at the border,” reported in conjunction with the Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute has been honored twice this awards season.

“Crossing the line at the border” won the Jack R. Howard Award for in-depth television coverage from the Scripps Howard Foundation. The citation noted that Need to Know’s reporting on the U.S. Border Patrol had ”led members of Congress to call for an internal review, and led the United Nations to address what it called “an international issue of concern.”

Established in 1953, the Scripps Howard Foundation’s national journalism awards competition is open to news organizations based in the U.S. and recognizes outstanding print, broadcast and online journalism in 15 categories.

Society of Professional JournalistsIn April, the piece was honored by The Society of Professional Journalists with the Sigma Delta Chi award for Investigative Journalism. Judges chose from more than 1,700 entries in categories covering print, radio, television and online. Dating back to 1932, the awards originally honored six individuals for contributions to journalism. The current program began in 1939, when the Society granted the first Distinguished Service Awards. The honors later became the Sigma Delta Chi Awards.

Founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi, SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and protects First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press.

 

Crossing the line at the border report

Crossing the line at the border report

Check out the The Nation Institute’s extensive report on the impact of the “Crossing the Line” series.

Credits: Producer and Camera: Brian Epstein; Editor: Judith Starr Wolff; Field Producers: John Carlos Frey and Alexandra Nikolchev; Correspondent and Producer: John Larson; Executive Producer: Marc Rosenwasser. 

 

Watch:

In the rush to stem the tide of undocumented immigrants, has Border Patrol committed widespread abuse on American soil?

More from Need to Know’s Border Patrol series:

Crossing the line at the border, part 1

The show’s first report on the subject aired in April and sparked a federal grand jury probe. In partnership with the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute, Need to Know investigates whether U.S. border agents have been using excessive force in an effort to curb illegal immigration.

Crossing the line at the border, part 1 update

One week after our initial broadcast, we took another look at the story of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas. Plus, an interview with Democratic Congressman Raul Grijalva, who tells us that members of congress have inquired about his case before, but had heard nothing from the Justice Department.

Crossing the line at the border, part 2

On Friday, July 20, Need to Know aired the second part of our investigation into alleged abuses by U.S. Border Patrol agents. Correspondent John Larson investigates stories of physical abuse, sexual assault and even torture.

Read: Renewed call for inquiry into border abuses

Guerrero

Web extra: Interview with Andrea Guerrero

Need to Know’s report on the circumstances surrounding the death of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas, an undocumented worker living in San Diego, has led to a federal grand jury probe.

PDF: Members of Congress demand investigation

Watch more full episodes of Need to Know.

 
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Comments

  • Unsustainability

    Maybe in order to get real depth to its journalism, PBS should shift away from interviewing people with a vested interest in events, and attempt to provide a more macrocosmic view of something like immigration. Maybe the most important issue facing the U.S. and this planet orb is sustainability as population growth moves deeper into a dangerous “footprint,” and resource depletion. and ecological degradation raise spectres of civilizational collapse. Why not look to see if absorbing millions of people per year contributes to this paradigm for the U.S.? That means really analyzing, thinking, and testing the very limits of what is involved in the 5 w’s and h while moving away from convenient interviews, and secretarially promulgating news releases from those with money/power.