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Finding clarity of purpose at Occupy Wall Street

Contrary to the pervasive charges of “vagueness” levied at the movement, author Francine Prose applauds the protesters’ clarity of understanding of the most basic social and economic realities.

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The seven biggest economic lies

The president’s jobs bill doesn’t have a chance in Congress — and the Occupiers on Wall Street and elsewhere can’t become a national movement for a more equitable society – unless more Americans know the truth about the economy, says former Labor Secretary Robert Reich.

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Herman Cain thinks Uzbekistan doesn’t matter. He’s wrong.

Herman Cain recently dismissed Uzbekistan as a country Americans shouldn’t care about. Joshua Foust explains why he’s wrong.

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Local transportation projects gain steam

Despite the dire state of our transportation infrastructure, there’s cause to be optimistic: Cities, states and counties are finding new ways to fund much-needed initiatives, writes Samuel I. Schwartz.

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Rick Perry: Man of science?

Yale University’s Carolyn Mazure asks why Gov. Rick Perry is trying to discourage public trust in science, when its methods have directly contributed to his political success.

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Follow the money: Behind Europe’s debt crisis lurks another Wall Street bailout

The United States wants Europe to bail out its deeply indebted nations so they can repay what they owe big European banks. Otherwise, those banks could implode — taking Wall Street with them, writes former Labor Secretary Robert Reich.

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Occupy Wall Street: Why so many demands for demands?

Previous protests have presented detailed policy proposals to no avail. Maybe it’s time to try something new, writes The Nation’s Betsy Reed.

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A double-dip recession may be the least of our worries

A few months ago, it looked like the economy was on its way to full recovery. Today, things don’t look so rosy, writes Michael D. Yates – and given the current political climate in most societies, there’s little cause for optimism that things will get better.

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Globalization’s government

In the era of globalization, we need more government, not less, says economist Jeffrey Sachs.

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The ‘Responsibility to Protect’ doctrine after Libya

Michael Brendan Dougherty argues that capricious application of the “Responsibility to Protect” doctrine only serves to highlight Western hypocrisy.

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Are private contractors undermining the intelligence community?

For Joshua Foust, the biggest problem facing the intelligence community is not that some contractors abuse the system, but rather that the government has designed a system that encourages abuse.

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A fight worth having

For former Labor Secretary Robert Reich, the defining battle of 2012 won’t be over Medicare or Obama’s jobs program — it will be over whether the rich should pay more taxes.

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Making a case for the gas tax

The coming federal gas tax reauthorization showdown puts millions of workers and billions of dollars on the line. If the federal government can’t create a unified response to this infrastructure crisis, each state must act, writes Samuel I. Schwartz.

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Second GOP debate exposes foreign-policy divide

Until the Republicans can figure out a unified message for foreign policy, we can expect continued confusion and inconsistency from the debates, writes Joshua Foust.

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Memo to Romney: Time to be bold

Michael Brendan Dougherty explains why Mitt Romney must become more like the man who defeated him last time — a teller of hard truths – if he is to win the GOP nomination.

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Why sovereignty matters

Touting Libya as a triumph of interventionism before there is even a replacement government in place is the height of hubris and myopia, argues Joshua Foust.