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This Labor Day, we need protests

Labor Day is traditionally a time for picnics and parades. But this year is no picnic for American workers, and a protest march would be more appropriate than a parade, says former Labor Secretary Robert Reich.

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The tyranny of happiness

For Joshua Foust, many of this country’s recent foreign policy missteps have been the result of far too much “positive thinking,” and far too little skepticism.

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No bridge over troubled water: Our economy depends on a functioning transportation system

Can the nation afford $56 billion on highway spending alone? Samuel Schwartz argues that the costs of failing to improve our national infrastructure are the ones we really can’t afford.

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Resetting the ‘Russian reset’

There is a growing movement to resurrect Russia as America’s biggest rival. But painting Russia only as the enemy misrepresents what it really is, writes Joshua Foust — a large, complex and ascendant power seeking to flex its muscles.

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Slouching toward a double dip, for no good reason

If our lawmakers continue to obsess about the wrong thing and fail to do what must be done, Americans will only become more fearful, insecure and angry, writes former Labor Secretary Robert Reich.

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Anarchy in the UK

It’s taken years to brew the toxic mix of hopelessness and rage, disenfranchisement and greed that erupted in Britain this week, writes Maria Margaronis.

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Lessons from this weekend’s Afghan helicopter crash

For Joshua Foust, the real scandal in Afghanistan isn’t that Americans are getting killed — it’s that we don’t know why we’re there in the first place.

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Budget cuts by hatchet or scalpel?

With cuts looming for defense and security budgets, Joshua Foust argues that we first need to have a larger discussion about long-term U.S. foreign policy priorities and objectives.

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On the origins of the debt-ceiling crisis

Stephen Squibb examines how the GOP successfully recast retirement and healthcare savings as “entitlements,” refused tax increases and now finds itself perched on the edge of its greatest victory.

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Anders Behring Breivik’s thought crimes

In trying to understand the suspect in the massacre in Norway, we should look at his choices and not just his extremist political beliefs, argues Joshua Foust.

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An indecent proposal for our country’s infrastructure future

Is it fiscally responsible to cut transportation spending now when this country’s infrastructure needs are only growing?, asks Samuel I. Schwartz.

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Is Rick Perry the new Fred Thompson?

The Texas governor may be more overpraised than the Law & Order veteran — and more vulnerable, says Michael Brendan Dougherty.

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Blame the road, not the victim

Raquel Nelson faces prison for jaywalking during a hit-and-run accident that killed her son. But Sally Flocks argues that the agencies that designed the roads and located bus stops bear some responsibility for this crash.

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What’s wrong with the U.S. intelligence community?

Is the intelligence community relying too much on politically biased reports about Iran, or is the problem, as Joshua Foust argues, that their conclusions are foregone?

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A modest proposal for a new population debate

What caused the disappearances of not only “population bomb” rhetoric but also the milder quality of life critique, asks Professor Derek Hoff.

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The $800 million question

In its long lovers’ quarrel with Pakistan, the U.S. has again suspended aid. Joshua Foust asks: Is this just another example of “too little, too late” policy making?