Update: Family planning in Texas

Texas lawmakers have agreed to set aside their differences — at least for the time being — to make some progress on the question of women’s health, the Texas Tribune reported May 4.

From reporter Becca Aaronson:

The political fireworks and high-octane drama that accompanied lawmakers’ 2011 fight over women’s health care and abortion have been absent this legislative session. They have been replaced with some semblance of concession, as legislators on both sides of the aisle work quietly to restore financing for women’s health services.

They have done it with little more than a handshake agreement. Democrats will not die on the sword of bringing Planned Parenthood back into the fold, and Republicans will not put up additional barriers to women’s access to care.

“The major difference is we’re not fighting about it. We’re just doing what’s right for women and the state,” State Representative Sarah Davis, Republican of West University Place, said last month at a Texas Tribune symposium on health care.

Watch Need to Know’s 2012 report on the state of women’s health programs in Texas, with reporting by correspondent Mona Iskander:

Watch The family planning fight on PBS. See more from Need To Know.

For continued coverage of women’s health in Texas, view our Web Extra interview with Emily Ramshaw and check up on the status of state reproductive laws and family planning funding by visiting The Guttmacher Institute’s state by state information. For more, view this interactive tracking the state’s abortion legislation as well as continued comprehensive coverage on related topics.

 
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