Look no further: The military’s detainee abuse investigation task force

What is considered acceptable treatment of detainees in American custody has been a troublesome issue almost since the U.S. response to 9/11 began. The abuse of detainees at Abu Ghraib prison isn’t the only example that has come to light.

This week, the debate continues over whether the killing of Osama bin Laden was made possible, at least in part, by the practice the Bush administration called “enhanced interrogation techniques” and what critics call torture. Perhaps the larger question is whether those kinds of tactics are ever justified.

In a joint investigation with the Nation Institute Investigative Fund and reporter Joshua Phillips, Need to Know reveals, for the first time, the inner workings of a little-known U.S. military task force charged with examining cases of detainee abuse in Iraq. One of the special agents in charge describes the task force as under-resourced and hampered by a bureaucracy unable or unwilling to facilitate its investigations.

Phillips, who cracked open the secret world of American soldiers who admitted to torturing detainees in his book “None of Us Were Like This Before,” now focuses on whether allegations of torture have been properly investigated by the U.S. military.

Related:

“Inside the Detainee Abuse Task Force” by Joshua Phillips  [The Nation]

Watch the rest of the segments from this episode.

 
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Comments

  • Anonymous

    So, who’s the current president? Oh..that’s right, Bush the 3rd. Obama is an accomplice to torture just as much as Bush ever was. I will always hope that the victims of our torture will have their day of justice.

  • Anonymous

    So, who’s the current president? Oh..that’s right, Bush the 3rd. Obama is an accomplice to torture just as much as Bush ever was. I will always hope that the victims of our torture will have their day of justice.

  • Anonymous

    Great piece, albeit disturbing.

    How sad that so many Americans seem to be complacent about torture.  Where is our empathy?  I would like to say to my fellow citizens, “Recall from your life experience how much pain and destruction have resulted from a single collision or fall, lasting a few seconds.  Now imagine you have been detained.  You know you are innocent but can’t prove it, and somebody is trying to break your will and is thinking up all sorts of ingenious ways to inflict pain and humiliation on you.  They don’t merely have seconds, but weeks, months or even years to do so.  How bad do you think it could get?”

    I would also ask, “What do we stand for anymore as Americans.”

  • Anonymous

     Amazing piece of journalism.  I wonder if the US government will actually do something about this, though!  I mean, now we’ve heard it from the horse’s mouth about all the reasons why the government hasn’t really looked into these cases.  Are they going to re-open any of them?  Seems like it would be the least they could do for Ms. Burke and her clients.