The Daily Need

Egypt in transition

President-elect Mohammed Morsi, shakes hands with an Egyptian police general in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Photo: AP Photo/Middle East News Agency, HO

This past Sunday, Egyptian election officials declared Mohammed Morsi Egypt’s first freely elected president in the country’s history. Although it is unclear what authority he will have, his win is considered a huge victory for the Muslim Brotherhood. The 84-year-old Islamist group was outlawed under Hosni Mubarak but formed its own political party after his fall last year. They captured 47 percent of the parliament late last year. However, days before the presidential run-off election, Egypt’s Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) dissolved the parliament and reinstated their authority to operate unchallenged.

Protests continue and the country remains deeply divided: while many celebrated Morsi’s historic win in the streets of Cairo, others are deeply suspicious of the Brotherhood’s intentions.

We reported an in-depth story from Egypt in January during the one year anniversary of the revolution. From the iconic Tahrir Square to poor areas on the outskirts of Cairo, we spoke to regular Egyptians about their fears, hopes and dreams.

Watch Egypt, Now on PBS. See more from Need To Know.

 
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