The Daily Need

Is Detroit the new Brooklyn?

Detroit's crumbling Packard plant. Photo: Flickr/Thomas Hawk

Last weekend, the New York Times featured a story in its Style section about the onslaught of hip, young urban pioneers streaming into downtown Detroit. These “creatives,” as they are being called, are taking advantage of low rents and the opportunity to recycle this abandoned, blank slate of an urban landscape into something new and exciting. There are restaurateurs and entrepreneurs of all stripes living alongside environmentalists and urban farmers.  The city, according to the Times, seems like “a giant candy store for young college graduates wanting to be their own bosses.” One woman said that there’s a cool party just about every evening.  The article pointed out that even though recent census figures show that Detroit’s overall population shrank by 25 percent in the last 10 years, downtown Detroit experienced a 59 percent increase in the number of college-educated residents under the age of 35.

No doubt this is partly a word-of-mouth, grass-roots “movement.”  But behind the scene, millions of public, private and foundation dollars are greasing the wheels. Last April, Blueprint America profiled an effort called Live Midtown, an incentive program created to lure some of the 30,000 employees of midtown’s major anchor institutions (Wayne State University, Detroit Medical Center and Henry Ford Health System) to move from the suburbs back into the city. By the end of June, 178 people were reported to have taken advantage of deep discounts on rent ($2,500 the first year and $1,000 the second) or purchases ($20,000 toward the purchase of their primary residence). We also looked at an effort by the mayor’s office to use federal stimulus money to lure members of Detroit’s police force out of the ’burbs and back into town.

And more incentives are on the way. Dan Gilbert, the founder and chairman of Quicken Loans, for instance, is one of the city’s biggest boosters.  He calls his revitalization effort “Detroit 2.0” and seems to be putting his money (more than $100 million by some estimates) where his mouth is. Gilbert recently moved Quicken Loans’ headquarters (and the 2,000 employees who worked there) out of a nearby suburb into downtown Detroit.  And he’s in the process of buying four historic buildings which he plans to fill with tech and web-based companies, some of which will no doubt come from Bizdom U, an “entrepreneurial boot camp” Gilbert started several years ago. Biz U offers graduates financing opportunities of up to $100,000 if they base their start-up in Detroit.

And it’s not just the style writers who are paying attention to Detroit’s new entrepreneurial class. Just three years ago, Forbes placed Detroit on top of its list of America’s Most Miserable Cities. But in a stunning turnaround, this month Forbes put Detroit on the cover as one of the Best Places for Doing Business, calling it “a land of opportunity.”

 
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Comments

  • Torya

    I love Detroit, but please, everyone stop with the fake Detroit hype, it’s embarassing. A month ago we were the most violent, dysfunctional city on earth Detroit, now we are the next Brooklyn! Let’s keep everything in perspective. Detroit is Detroit and Brooklyn is Brooklyn. It is impossible to confuse or even make comparisons between the two. Comparing the two just makes it more obvious how far Detroit have to go and it isn’t a fair comparison. Detroit doesn’t need to be the  next anything. We don’t even have the level of downtown shopping a mid size city has, i’m just being honest… We have gone from being too negative to delusional overnight. To say that Detroit is the next Brooklyn, even with a question mark, is absolutely ridiculous. 

  • Torya

    I love Detroit, but please, everyone stop with the fake Detroit hype, it’s embarassing. A month ago we were the most violent, dysfunctional city on earth Detroit, now we are the next Brooklyn! Let’s keep everything in perspective. Detroit is Detroit and Brooklyn is Brooklyn. It is impossible to confuse or even make comparisons between the two. Comparing the two just makes it more obvious how far Detroit have to go and it isn’t a fair comparison. Detroit doesn’t need to be the  next anything. We don’t even have the level of downtown shopping a mid size city has, i’m just being honest… We have gone from being too negative to delusional overnight. To say that Detroit is the next Brooklyn, even with a question mark, is absolutely ridiculous. 

  • http://www.twitter.com/3sixteenweb Billy (@3sixteenweb)

    Certainly understand your frustration, but the comparison is really a compliment.  Lots of cities at some point in their history have had struggles.  I’m sure naysayers said the same thing about Brooklyn or Harlem for that matter.  

    The reality is Detroit needs, no, requires that as a community we have a vested interest in it’s success, that includes the suburbs.  

    The fact that Detroit is getting national love should be a good thing, not a source of frustration.  Would you rather have the continued negative press?  We all know how far Detroit needs to go, but really, the love makes those outside of the city take a second look.  

    My love for the city is huge, stories like this get me ever closer to convincing those that need it join me in my quest to move downtown.  

    It will take pioneers and hard work.  The shopping can’t come until the people do.  Detroit is (insert here) but really it’s what WE, you and me and everyone else make it. 

  • frances

    Maybe you were just quoting from the hype, but we need to watch it with the “blank slate” characterizations of Detroit. It’s hardly blank if 800,000 people (most of whom are not young, white “creatives”) already live there. I love everything that’s happening in the city right now, but let’s remember that a few hundred white kids can’t speak for everyone. Reading the recent coverage, and especially looking at the pictures that accompany the articles, you’d think there wasn’t a black person in the city.

  • Detroit is not coming back.

    Detroit the next Brooklyn?  I haven’t been to Brooklyn recently.  When did it turn into the most blighted, depressed city in the country?  Detroit is never “coming back.”  Even if areas like Midtown (which is actually what the NY Times article was referencing, even though they kept referring to it as downtown) appear to go through some type of Renaissance, areas like Delray and Brightmoor continue to decay.

  • Torya

    Do I think that Detroit needs the “continued negative press”?  Of course not, I just want realistic press. The negative press was just as sensational as this article, even though I understand what the writer is trying to do because we’ve had so much unwarranted negative press. Keep in mind everyone, these articles have gone from (worst city in the world) 0-100 (next Brooklyn),  overnight and all I am saying is “calm down” and let’s have some perspective. I like positive article about Detroit, but let’s not go overboard. Billy, I don’t mean any disrespect, but I am one of those people that are not watching from the sidelines. I am putting my money where my mouth is I don’t need to be convinced to live here, this is my home. I have always lived here and have several businesses here. I encourage people to come to Detroit and open business and live here, but all i am saying is let’s not over hype things. Detroit can not be compared to any other city, just because of our history and the way our city was set up. We are in the rebuilding stages and it would be nice for anyone coming here to know that Detroit is in the baby stages of rebuilding itself. 

  • Ebony

    If the national press is truly interested in learning more about Detroit beyond the dominant, superficial national media narrative, Dr. Jerry Herron of Wayne State University wrote an excellent essay last year, “Borderland/Borderama/Detroit”:  It’s one of the very best analyses of what happened here in Detroit and who we are, from De
    Tocqueville’s early descriptions through Henry Ford, Motown, and
    Eminem: http://places.designobserv​er.com/feature/borderland-​borderama-detroit-part-1/1​3778/

  • Tom Jenkins

    If you vicariously visit Detroit via articles such as this you can’t see the reality. There are vast areas, measured in square miles, that are nothing but vacant fields. These were once vibrant social neighborhoods. The houses and the people are gone. It will be years before these areas are filled in, if ever. Every now and then I return, visit old stomping grounds and leave with a sense of dispair. This has been a long process that’s flashpoint start was the 1967 riots. Truth is it began long before that. It will take decades to recover and now small group of urban returnees (creatives) will be enough. I’m not saying it can’t be done, it just can’t be done with short term expectations.

  • http://www.twitter.com/3sixteenweb Billy (@3sixteenweb)

    Clearly anything started with “no disrespect” is headed that direction, but hey, I’ll let it fly.  Remember I’m on your team….where I think the conversation starts breaking down, is this idea that those of us who don’t live in the city aren’t somehow putting our money where our mouths are.  That somehow we don’t ALL have a vested interest in the city. It’s not a You vs. Me just because I don’t live there….yet.  

     There are lots of reasons why some of us are on the so called “sidelines” and it’s not because we don’t want to be there.  I’m on the sidelines because I have a spouse with a different view on city living than I do.  

    I wish you nothing but success in your business and would love to be down there someday soon doing the same. 

  • TS

    I agree with Torya 100%. Detroit is Detroit and will NEVER be Brooklyn. Also…with 800,000 residents Detroit is far from a “blank slate”. btw…besides the couple hundred or so “creatives”  (read: unemployed, mostly suburban, 20- somethings, living off of their parents bankroll)….exactly what is the comparison between Detroit and Brooklyn anyways? I can guarantee that less than a handful of the young creative types are earning any type of living from “urban pioneering”. We definitely need positive, realistic stories about Detroit…but I fear that people in the media are selling a fake bill of goods and portraying Detroit to be the next BIG thing…Detroit’s rebirth is in its infancy and certainly has decades to go.

  • HopeforDetroit

    Why do people hate Detroit?  I guess it’s the American way.  The City is struggling, but some people are striving to do the right things and create opportunity.  These people are the true American heros.  It’s easy to criticize, it’s a challenge to be solution-focused.  The claim that; “Detroit will never come back’ is very, very unfair.

  • Torya

    Billy, I said “no disrespect” because I don’t know you and I’m talking to you personally, that’s all. The conversation gets broken down because articles like this does no more than give people a “pat on the back” and “warm their hearts” about the city. I just want more of a critical eye. Why does that mean “would I rather just have negative press”? You said it yourself that articles like this helps to convince you to move here and that “we” all need to pitch in an make it happen, I agree. I’m not trying to draw a line in the sand, but it’s easy from where ever you are, whether you are in Michigan or somewhere else in the US, to try to convince me that I should just appreciate every every nice article about Detroit, whether it tells the whole picture or not. Everyone in the metro area does contribute to the success of Detroit, whether they live here or not, but lets not write fakey, Pollyanna stories about Detroit. Let’s stop trying to make Detroit “happen”/ “be cool”. It is what it is. The foundations who are paying people to move here are wasting their money. You can’t force Detroit to be a cool artsy city by just talking about it and paying people to live here, It just happens. It happens by helping small businesses to create lively, walkable neighborhoods. People will come. 
    We’ve gone from “Violent City #1″ to “Burgeoning Artist City” in a few months. Forgive my lack of headline writing skills, but a simple headline of “More Artists/Young Professional are Considering/Moving to Detroit.”just about does it, because that’s what’s really happening. Comparing Detroit to Brooklyn at anytime during the history of Brooklyn, is laughable. although I see where the writer was just simply trying to write a positive story, but let’s not get carried away. 

  • Unfair?

    Unfair?  Absolutely not.  Why should anyone believe that Detroit is coming back?  Color me skeptical, but I find any article espousing this idea that the city is somehow finally going through a renaissance very hard to believe, especially since the Renaissance Center was built in 1977 and local politicians began referring to it as “The Renaissance City” around the same time.  Why?  The city’s population and per capita income has done nothing but continue to drop since the riots.  It’s great that Midtown is experiencing somewhat of a revival (even if at the hands of freshly graduated suburban trust funders with no real world experience), but it’s hardly indicative of any significant turnaround in the city’s progress.  Show me population growth.  Show me an increase in per capita income.  Show me improved graduation rates, or show me public classrooms with less than 50 students per teacher at the very least.

  • http://www.twitter.com/3sixteenweb Billy (@3sixteenweb)

    I hear you and I understand your point of view. Like yourself, I’m an entrepreneur, and like you believe that helping small business get a footing will help revitalize neighborhoods regardless of the location.  

    Thanks for the lively back and forth. I truly do wish you success in your endeavors. 

  • Gregory

    living in both cities works for me. Been in Detroit since 92 but I couldn’t live here for more than 8 months straight. no where to buy anything cold and fresh for dinner ANYWHERE. and when I want a nice shirt I need to go back to ny to find it. sorry.. I love you D. but you aint quite there yet! But I too am certainly am investing in you! Fire House – 2 weeks!

  • Ari

    Then you obviously haven’t heard of us.  Joshua-Gold.com, custom fitting the men of Detroit.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1253960804 Liz Hill

    Also, I know it’s not Detroit proper, but there are hundreds of places within 20 minutes of Detroit to get amazing clothes. You don’t need to go to NY. That’s crazy.

  • Tabby123

    Thanks for the heads up.

    I will never be visiting Brooklynn…sounds awful.

  • Derpina

    “(even if at the hands of freshly graduated suburban trust funders with no real world experience)”

    And what is your definition of “real world experiences?”

    I do believe if you are living in today’s world, it is considered living in the real world. Dealing with the same issues as everybody else, in the same day in age.

    Is there another world you’re not telling me about?

  • Derpina

    “We don’t even have the level of downtown shopping a mid size city has,”

    Meijer is leasing out an area right in the heart of downtown to make this happen. Next incompetent gripe, please.

  • Derpina

    It’s a blank slate in the sense that there are hardly any businesses thriving in Detroit.

    Yes people are living there, but they are barely living there. And that population compared to what it used to be is NOTHING.

    You can pretty much do whatever you want and not have to worry about big business coming in and shutting down your operations. Most landlords have given up on their buildings and let them decay. This means whoever wants to come in and fix up the place, start a business, can do that.

    It is also a blank slate as in a means to a fresh start. To try and get away from the murder-capital label we have been given. If the community worked together to keep each other alive and working, then that is a fresh start, a BLANK SLATE that is now painted upon.

    A few hundred white kids can’t speak for everyone?

    Why not?

    If a few hundred murderers can speak for Detroit, THEN SO CAN WE.

  • http://twitter.com/InternBritt Intern Britt

    This positive press for Detroit is great, and it’s always nice to read about efforts on creating a there there for Detroit. But while Brooklyn is great, lets let Detroit just be Detroit. Here’s a way to start.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tomm-Chicoine/1165924594 Tomm Chicoine

    Getting “hipsters” into the city is great and all, but watch them all flee to the suburbs within ten years once they want to have kids. No one with a choice is sending their kids to DPS. Places to buy vinyl, get haute cuisine, and try on skinny leg jeans might make a place attractive on the surface, but without a strong backbone of city services and schools, that’s all it is–surface gloss.

  • Mary Morris

    Well, call me an optomist, but no one ever accomplished a goal without setting one. It’s important to focus on the positive aspects of Detroit and move forward from there with some goals.  ”The more man meditates upon good thoughts, the better will be his world and the world at large.” – Confucius 

  • Mary Morris

    Well, call me an optomist, but no one ever accomplished a goal without setting one. It’s important to focus on the positive aspects of Detroit and move forward from there with some goals.  ”The more man meditates upon good thoughts, the better will be his world and the world at large.” – Confucius 

  • http://thegreatermarin.wordpress.com/ OctaviusIII

    I don’t know – typically gay men have been at the vanguard of urban renewal; hipsters might be the same.  Besides, even if the support from any given individual proves ephemeral, it can be enough to attract more people than are leaving.  Once a critical mass gets going, that backbone gets rebuilt.  DC’s public schools are seeing a turnaround because of support at the top and a hipster-driven baby boom, but it’s taken 10 years of repopulation to get there.

  • Larry Eiler

    This is great new perspective the Times gets for Detroit.  Michigan has to have a powerful and forward-moving city, Detroit, to get back on track and away from the years-long inferiority complex we all developed in the downturn.  ”Relentless positive action” enunciated by Gov. Snyder will help us all recover and Dan Gilbert and others will help make Detroit move the right way again.
    Larry Eiler

  • http://www.facebook.com/ebonisenai Eboni Senai

     I understand what they’re getting at but I don’t like the framing of the headlines’ question. Brooklyn was thriving & stable before it was gentrified.

  • Anonymous

    If you are a resident of Detroit I congradulate you on the rebuilding of your City…I will say this to you:  Before you make that type of decision, research Brooklyn, New York, and might I also add to watch how you spell Brooklynn it has One “n”

  • Lillien Waller

    I agree–the comparison to Brooklyn is shortsighted. Besides, Brooklyn these days is most noteworthy for yuppies driving up rents, displaced older communities, and self-righteous DIY lifestyles. (I live in Harlem, that other great site of NYC gentrification.)

    But as someone who returns to Detroit, my hometown, every year and is seriously considering moving back, I think the positive press can’t hurt. Media is powerful; I’d rather read stories that are prematurely optimistic than stories that are aggressively pessimistic. Enough already with the “ruin porn,” misinformation, and declarations of urban apocalypse. (Contrary to popular notions, esp. the waste-of-time TV doc, Detroit: City of Heartbreak and Hope, Detroiters have access to some of the freshest fruit and vegetables in the state. I know this because I grew up in the shadow of the Eastern Market–an institution unparalleled in MOST American cities of similar size.)

    In case the naysayers haven’t heard, young, creative, energetic college grads–who, yes, may leave one day but will be replaced by others–are EXACTLY who you want to move to the city. And yes, the infrastructure has a long, long way to go, but would you rather “creatives” and others NOT move back at all? It’s ridiculous and illogical to say that the city is in desperate need of help but then flaggelate people who, in ways large and small, are trying to do just that. Detroit still has a long way to go, but the journey of a thousand steps, etc. –Lillien Waller, editor of American Ghost: Poets on Life after Industry (Stockport Flats, 2011)

  • Linda Stonich

    Silly Cyndi(who doesn’t)seeall!  People in glass spelling bees should not throw stones. (congratulate: c-o-n-g-r-a-t-u-l-a-t-e)  :-)

  • http://twitter.com/RorysATwit Rory G

    Just a tiny note: I wouldn’t have cited Forbes’ lists for, well, anything.  The publication’s name carries unjustified trust, and the tidbit you cited gives an inkling as to why:  The 2011 list of “America’s Most Miserable Cities” included Fort Lauderdale, FL, Chicago, and Washington, DC.  Hardly an aptly-named article, and the methodology was atrocious, being both barely scientific and useless from a pragmatic reader’s standpoint.  I’m not sure what Forbes editor let their junior staff (interns?) get away with such a poorly-conceived and researched piece, but it certainly surprises me to see it echoed on PBS.  Hoping for better sources from you guys next time.

  • frances

    I’ve lived in Detroit, been in a band in Detroit, and again, I’m overjoyed that cool things are happening and murder-capital prejudices are being challenged. But it’s dumb, sad, and racist to show up with the attitude that nobody was doing anything interesting or positive until you moved to the block with your artist collective, chicken farm, or what-have-you. Taking the attitude that because you’re young, energetic, “creative” (and white) you can decide what’s best for everyone in the “community” is called gentrification. But I’m not here to criticize people of any background that are doing good work in Detroit, I just wish this new crop of stories in the media presented the situation in its full complexity… and “blank slate” is a gross oversimplification.

  • http://www.facebook.com/lounovak Lou Novak

    if you’re gonna advertize at least make it Made in Detroit

    http://www.madeindetroit.com/

  • http://twitter.com/thomashawk Thomas Hawk

    Awesome photo.  :)

  • Nancy W

    Detroit now has a lively theater scene. An article in the Feb issue of American Theatre magazine described it in detail: http://jasonsebacher.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/at_feb11_michigan.pdf

  • Stanley

    No matter the hype, it’s still a very unsafe and deadly city. Period. I’ve lived here nearly 60 years, so trust me on this one.

  • DaveB

    Frances, I agree that blank slate / canvas is a divisive term and too many people use it not realizing the full impact of what they imply. We didn’t get this sort of press over the last 20 years, while Focus:HOPE and Vanguard and so many others were doing great things. We didn’t get this kind of coverage when Comerica Park was built or Compuware came to downtown.

    But we are getting it now. And the creatives are driving a lot of this attention. I really don’t care who gets the credit, as long as those of us “on the ground” keep working toward revitalizing the city. Let the few hundred white kids be our voice for the moment. When they’re no longer interesting to the national press, we will have created a world class city that keeps the media watching.

  • DaveB

    Then you are not paying attention to what’s going on in Brightmoor these days. Take another look.

  • DaveB

    Then you are not paying attention to what’s going on in Brightmoor these days. Take another look.

  • DaveB

    Right on. The concept of “food deserts” in Detroit is largely misunderstood. If anyone takes the time to go back to the original stories on the issue, you’ll see they are all based on one report (“Examining the Impact of Food Deserts on Public Health in Detroit”).

    That report defines a food desert as areas where the nearest grocery store is twice as far away as the nearest fringe food location (e.g., convenience store, fast food restaurant). Hardly the same thing as “there are no good grocery stores”.

  • RS

    lol you must be an expert. idiot

  • Djshomers

    Awesome photo of a factory that closed in the mid 50s, yet is recycled in every article about Detroit’s ‘blank slate’ as if it’s a new story.
     

  • Officialfrizzo

    What did Brooklyn ever do that even resembles what’s going on in Detroit? Detroit is it’s own city. Whoever wrote this is a New Yorker that wants to be from Detroit.

  • Allisonyvo

    NOT TRUE!!!

  • Mies Davis

    It is so unsafe and deadly that you:
    A. Are still alive (and)
    B. Have not left.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=30307307 Sean M. Gray

    “Real world experiences” are obviously those experiences which cement the notion that that one may safely view the decay of Detroit from the suburbs because surely that decay knows to stop at the city limits. I may not appreciate the young ‘blank slate’ crowd but I hope that those who stay here are changed and those who leave do so to find new challenges and not in deference to old differences.

  • DetroitResident

    Stop comparing us to New York.  It’s starting to get annoying now.

  • Isaac Basker

    i disagree. yes, infrastructure is necessary eventually, but former poor and desolate areas of new york city in parts of brooklyn and manhattan first had an influx of young creative types in search of a place to love and create. berlin has seen the same thing, as it has become more chic. yes, some may end up leaving as they get older, but not necessarily because you can’t raise children in a city like detoit. more likely it will be because they eventually can’t afford to have children in a city.

    that’s what is happening and has happened in new york city, as i will testify to as a life long resident. yes, lowering crime matters, but as an area attracts more college educated people/creative types the crime that scares off some will probably go down over time. of course, so will the costs of living, and that will lead to a demand from — let’s be honest here — more privileged, likely white — residents who tend to get more what they ask for when it comes to this demanding this kind of thing from the government than poor communities of color, or will use their own funds to build it. in the west village and chelsea, in manhattan, the highline park was at least partially funded by very wealthy residents and property owners with interest in seeing it built.

    just anecdotally, i have friends who have been life long manhattanites, some who would have cringed at living in brooklyn years ago, who are now renting and buying property there — and the areas they want to live in are not cheap by any means, but are less so than manhattan, and used to be much less attractive. it was the hipsters and artists, and those who identify as lgbt, by the way, who changed things first — check richard florida’s peer reviewed research regarding his gay bohemian index scale and what it says about changing economics in a city.

    i fully expect detroit to receive more young artists because brooklyn is running out of space and is getting increasingly costly to live in for these types.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=117534 Moose M Scheib

    Detroitttt….

  • Thebigm1986

    Thank you. Well said.

  • Thebigm1986

    Thank you. Well said.

  • Us

    Until Detroit has a subway and Windsor is Manhattan… the premise is ridiculous

  • dpofMI

    Building new business in Detroit is not the same as expecting one to move their family into a drug infested, gun-toting slum. 

  • meredith

    You can fit San Fransisco, Boston into the area that is Detroit it is huge. The area of the city they are talking about downtown crime rate is 27% less then the national average according the the Detroit welcome center a non-profit in Detroit.

  • meredith

    You can fit San Fransisco, Boston into the area that is Detroit it is huge. The area of the city they are talking about downtown crime rate is 27% less then the national average according the the Detroit welcome center a non-profit in Detroit.

  • former detroiter

    No thanks. Not returning to city that put us out without a second thought.Not returning to crime infested area no matter what color you put on it, you can put lipstick on a pig, it is still a pig.

  • former detroiter

    True Detroit Resident, the comparison should be to an outhouse. 

  • former detroiter

    Yes!  Freshest off that hi-jacked truck. 

  • former detroiter

    Detroit may return to its great self someday, but until then it will be the drug and gang infested toilet that we all know it to be.

  • former detroiter

    Run off the gangs, clean up the street and Detroit will come back. OH – upgrade that excuse of a football team. Jacksonville’s team is better!

  • former detroiter

    NOBODY wants to be from detroit. That is like claiming to be related to Obummer

  • DetroitSmells

    Stanley, sorry you got bashed by Doofis Davis, Little DikMan1986 and RS. Detroit used to be cool. Detroit Rock City. The motor-city madman, Well, guess what, now it’s gang infested, drug using crap hole that is a shadow of it’s former self

  • http://simplefolk.net Damon

    Very interesting article. I’ve a couple hidden post that read along these line. I’m going to keep a eye out for more.

  • Bpfillmo

    Can one buy skinny-jeans in this city? I have not found the place : )

  • John Daniels Tc

    University of Detroit Mercy, under its Jesuit president Gerard Stockhausen, was three years ahead of the rest, providing a $5000 mortgage subsidy for employees buying a home in the university neighborhoods (northwest, downtown, corktown).  Glad it caught on!

  • John Daniels Tc

    University of Detroit Mercy, under its Jesuit president Gerard Stockhausen, was three years ahead of the rest, providing a $5000 mortgage subsidy for employees buying a home in the university neighborhoods (northwest, downtown, corktown).  Glad it caught on!

  • John Daniels Tc

    University of Detroit Mercy, under its Jesuit president Gerard Stockhausen, was three years ahead of the rest, providing a $5000 mortgage subsidy for employees buying a home in the university neighborhoods (northwest, downtown, corktown).  Glad it caught on!

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  • detroit313

    Its a part of rebuilding I’ve lived in southwest Detroit 30yrs and Detroit is not as bad as outsiders z media make it violence is everywhere noticeably in more quiet suburban areas nowadays basically I’m saying eat shit and screw ur city

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