The Daily Need

Photo: Egypt’s ‘Friday of wrath’

Riot police force protesters back across the Kasr Al Nile Bridge as they attempt to enter Tahrir Square on Jan. 28, 2011, in downtown Cairo. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Thousands of police are on the streets of the capital and hundreds of arrests have been made in an attempt to quell anti-government demonstrations. Protesters, spurred on by recent events in Tunisia, want Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to end his 30-year rule and for the parliament to be dissolved.

The government blocked Internet access inside the country Friday. As darkness fell in Cairo on what some demostrators have called the “Friday of wrath,” a curfew imposed by the military has gone largely ignored. The government opposition leader, Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei, was placed under house arrest shortly after being doused with a water canon while his supporters tried to shield him from police. Reports and video indicated that Egypt’s ruling party headquarters are on fire. President Mubarak is expected to make a televised speech this evening to address the unrest.

 
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Comments

  • Anonymous

    chirac tenia razon….se metieron en una guerra de civilizaciones….la mejor estrategia no violar la ley del pendulo ni la ley de la inercia en ciencia politica….

  • Mohamed

    Egypt was boiling that day..however it was the begining of regime collapsing …in this day a new history was made for better Egypt